Course

BIO 125 Global Change

Professor

Catherine O’Reilly

CRN

95479

 

Schedule

Tu Th          9:00  -  10:20 am  OLIN 205

Mon (Lab)    1:30 –    4:30 pm  ROSE 305 OR

Tu   (Lab)      1:30 –   4:30 pm   HEG 308

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

Cross-listed:  Science, Technology & Society

This course offers an introduction to the climate and ecosystem principles needed to understand human impact on the natural environment. We discuss the issue of global change prediction and the scientific basis for global change assessments and policy measures. Key topics are the physical climate system and its variability, the carbon cycle and related ecosystem processes, nutrient cycles, land use patterns, and the impact of global change on society. Common threads in all of these topics include the use of observations and models, the consideration of multiple scales (temporal and spatial), the interaction of human behaviors and choices with natural systems, and the linkages among aspects of the global change issue.  Prerequisites: It is expected that students enrolled in this course will have had high school level biology, chemistry, or physics, and pre-calculus or their equivalent.

 

Course

BIO 130   Field Study in Natural History

Professor

William Maple

CRN

95223

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:30  -4:50 pm      HEG 308

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

Designed to acquaint the interested nonscience student with the plants and animals that make the Bard campus their home, including trees and shrubs in their winter condition and fall wildflowers.  Animal tracks and bird migrations also are objects of study. Although the course includes some lab work on preserved specimens, especially during severe weather, most class meetings are field trips. Participants must have clothing appropriate to the weather and terrain: good walking shoes or boots, warm clothing and rain gear. Some Saturday field trips and early morning meetings may be required. Limited to 10 students.

 

Course

BIO 141   Subcellular Biology

Professor

John Ferguson

CRN

95224

 

Schedule

Wed Fr        10:30  - 12:30 pm  HEG 102

Th (Lab)      1:30  -4:50 pm      ROSE 305 OR

Fr (Lab)      1:30  -4:50 pm      ROSE 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

An introductory survey of life at the cellular level primarily intended for prospective biology majors, but also open to interested students not majoring in science. Beginning with an introduction to the evolution and complexity of life, including the prokaryotes and the viruses, the course proceeds to examine the commonality of life at both the biochemical and cellular levels. A central section deals with energy transfer in living systems (fermentation, respiration, and photosynthesis), followed by another major section dealing with information transfer (genetics, nucleic acid replication, transcription, and translation). The course ends with discussions of more complex topics (genetic engineering, human genetics, and immunology). The laboratory portion of the course provides an introduction to the methodologies and instrumentation found in the modern biology lab. This course is appropriate for those interested in a career in the health professions and others interested in a broadly based view of modern biology. Offered every fall. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 141 concurrently. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses, and experience in high school biology and chemistry.

 

Course

BIO 160   Life in Sight: Investigations  under the Microscope

Professor

Justine Salton

CRN

95225

 

Schedule

Mon Wed     10:30  - 12:30 pm  ROSE 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

Some of the most interesting and aesthetically fascinating aspects of life are just out of human sight, but within our reach using simple stereoscopic microscopes. The underlying goal of this course is to use the microscope as a tool for learning to make inductive observations about living things, ask questions, and generate deductive hypotheses. With class themes in functional biology as a guide, students will use pre-prepared and self-prepared slides of microscopic organisms and parts of larger organisms to generate questions and hypotheses about “how things work.”

 

Course

BIO 161   Introduction to Genomics

Professor

Robert Cutler

CRN

95226

 

Schedule

Mon Wed     1:30  -3:30 pm      HDR 101A

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

What is a genome? How do genomes differ between species and individuals within a species? How are genomes sequenced and how is computation used to understand genomes? These fundamental questions will be explored through lectures and computer programming labs using PERL. To motivate the more abstract topics of information storage in genomic sequences, a series of programming exercises will examine several cryptographic systems to develop the programming skills needed to explore and understand the structure of genomic sequences. Final group projects will develop computer programs to further explore a genomic topic of interest to each group.   Prerequisites: The equivalent of AP Biology or AP Calculus, or permission of instructor.

 

Course

BIO 201   Eukaryotic Genetics

Professor

Michael Tibbetts

CRN

95227

 

Schedule

Wed Fr        1:30  -3:30 pm      HEG 201

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity in eukaryotic organisms.  This course takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern molecular and genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity.  In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication,  recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the

relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to our understanding of the processes involved in generating population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can help us identify the myriad genetic and non-genetic factors influencing these traits.  The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the genetic manipulation of a model organism’s genome to address one or more topics in the course.  Offered every fall.  Prerequisites: One year of college biology.

 

Course

BIO 301   Biochemistry

Professor

John Ferguson

CRN

95228

 

Schedule

Tu Th          9:50  - 11:50 am   HEG 106

Tu (Lab)      1:30  -4:50 pm      ROSE 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

An introduction to general biochemistry, including protein structure, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, coenzymes, thermodynamics, central metabolic pathways, biological membranes, DNA structure and replication, and ribosomal
translation.  An emphasis is placed on integrating knowledge of fundamental organic chemistry into a biological context. Laboratory work provides practical experience in the topics covered. Offered in alternate fall semesters.
Prerequisites: Biology 141, Chemistry 201-202.

 

Course

BIO 305   Ecology

Professor

Felicia Keesing

CRN

95229

 

Schedule

Mon Wed     10:30  - 11:50 am  HDR 101A

Wed (Lab)   1:00  -4:00 pm      ROSE 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

This course is an introduction to the patterns and processes that govern the interactions of organisms with each other and with their physical environments. We will explore mechanisms that affect the distribution and abundance of species using a combination of approaches including modeling, experimentation, and analysis of large datasets. The course will include field trips.

 

Course

BIO 306   Vertebrate Zoology

Professor

William Maple

CRN

95230

 

Schedule

Wed Fr        9:00  - 10:20 am   HEG 106

Fr (Lab)      1:30  -4:50 pm      HEG 308

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

The course surveys the natural history, evolution, and ecology of the vertebrates native to the Hudson Valley region.  Lab sessions are used for identification, taxonomy, and study techniques, with as much work as possible done in the field. Occasionally, evening or weekend classes are required.

Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Upper College standing, permission of the instructor; Biology 305 recommended.

 

Course

BIO 323   Bioinformatics

Professor

Robert Cutler

CRN

95312

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: LABORATORY SCIENCE

This course will examine the different computational methods used to search for, analyze, classify, and model DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. This includes methods that examine genome sequencing, gene expression, functional genomics,

snp's and variation within populations, as well as genome wide analysis. The emphasis of this lab course will be on the use of and familiarization with tools to find and predict genetic information.  These methods will then be related to the

larger context of the human genome project, and the direction such research may lead biology.

Prerequisite: Biology 141 and CMSC 141, or permission of the instructor.

 

Course

BIO 403   Advanced Topics in Cell Biology

Professor

Josh Rappoport

CRN

95232

 

Schedule

Mon             1:30  -3:30 pm      HEG 201

Distribution

OLD: n/a

NEW: n/a

(2 credits)  The course will meet once a week for two hours. Weeks will alternate between lectures and group evaluation of papers (2 per discussion) from the primary literature, relevant to the previous week’s lecture topic. Although each member of the class will be responsible for reading each paper and participating in discussions, teams of two students will be pre-selected to present the papers. The first week’s two-hour lecture will cover the fundamentals of cell biology as well as information specifically relevant to the first literature assignment. Some topics will focus on historical investigations central to cell biology, others will have students focusing on current, sometimes controversial investigations. Students will be evaluated on class participation on a weekly basis, on the presentation(s) given to the class and on a final paper, which will be based on two papers from the primary literature regarding a specific topic to be selected by the student. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and CHEM 201 & 202.

 

Course

BIO 411   Cancer Biology

Professor

Michael Tibbetts

CRN

95480

 

Schedule

Th    1:30 – 3:30 pm     HEG 300

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: N/A

2 credits  Cancer is a genetic disease that cannot be inherited, it is a disease in which one's own cells disrupt normal physiological functions, it is a disease for which some therapies result in the loss of the bodies ability to fight disease.  This advanced course will look at the complex reasons for these paradoxes and more by looking at a particular cancer from several perspectives: epidemiological, physiological, genetic, molecular and cellular.  A seminar style approach will be taken in which both text and the primary literature sources will be used to examine issues of cancer cause, progression, and treatment.  Students will be expected to present primary literature articles and to write a research paper on a type of cancer.  Prerequisites: moderated in biology and permission of instructor.