CRN

94309

Distribution

D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

SPAN 106

Title

Basic Intensive Spanish

Professor

Gabriela Carrion

Schedule

M Tu W Th       10:00 am –  11:00 am LC 120

M Tu W Th       11:30 am – 12:30 pm       LC 120

8 credits. This course is designed to enable students with little or no previous knowledge of Spanish to complete three semesters of college Spanish in five months (eight credits at Bard and four credits in Mexico in January). Students will attend eight hours of class per week plus two hours with the Spanish tutor. Oral communication, reading and writing skills will be developed through a variety of approaches. Prospective students must interview with the instructor prior to registration.

 

CRN

94314

Distribution

D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

SPAN 110

Title

Accelerated Spanish

Professor

TBA

Schedule

Mon Tu Wed Th   10:00 am - 11:00 am   OLIN 107

A course designed for the student who has had some prior exposure to Spanish or who has excellent command of another Romance language. All the major topics in grammar will be covered, and the course will provide intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). We will be using a new textbook specially designed to provide a streamlined review of basic topics in grammar and provide more detail and exercises for advanced topics. The textbook will be supplemented with authentic video material from Spain and Latin America. One additional hour per week of practice with  the Spanish tutor and a substantial amount of work in the language resource center will also be required. The course will prepare the student for summer language programs abroad or Spanish 201 the following semester.

 

CRN

94312

Distribution

D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

SPAN 201

Title

Intermediate Spanish I

Professor

Nicole Caso

Schedule

Mon Tu Wed Th   9:50 am - 10:50 am     LC 115

For students who have completed Spanish 106 or 110, or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to perfect the student’s command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work.

 

CRN

94307

Distribution

D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

SPAN 202

Title

Intermediate Spanish II

Professor

Melanie Nicholson

Schedule

Mon Tu Wed Th    8:50 am -  9:50 am     OLIN 107

This course continues refining and perfecting the student’s mastery of speaking, reading, comprehending and writing Spanish.  Advanced study of grammar is supplemented by a video series and authentic readings on a wide variety of topics related to Spanish and Latin American history, literature, music, and art.  Current topics in culture such as the Latin American military dictatorships or the issues surrounding the Hispanic presence in the United States will be discussed.  In addition to shorter readings, such as excerpts from Don Quixote and indigenous Mexican poetry, students will read one or more full-length modern novels.

Prerequisites: Spanish 201 or consent of instructor.

 

CRN

94308

Distribution

D / * (FLLC)

Course No.

SPAN 220

Title

The Hispanic Presence in US

Professor

Melanie Nicholson

Schedule

Mon Wed       10:00 am - 11:20 am     LC 208

Cross-listed: Human Rights, LAIS, SRE

This multidisciplinary course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the historical, social, political, legal, and linguistic issues surrounding the Hispanic presence in the United States.  It will also give advanced Spanish students an opportunity to utilize and improve their communication skills and broaden their cultural perspectives.  The first four weeks of the semester will be devoted to instruction in ESL (English as a Second Language) pedagogy.  At the end of this period, Bard students will be matched with Spanish speakers in the surrounding community and will begin providing instruction in conversational English.  For the remainder of the semester, students will meet in seminar format to discuss course readings.  Guest lecturers, both from within the Bard faculty and from other community agencies, will be invited to address students on particular issues, including the history of Hispanic immigration in the US (with a focus on New York state), economic issues regarding immigrants and migrants, particularly as they relate to the Hudson Valley in the past decade; political conflicts arising out of illegal immigration; legislation and the role of the INS; attitudes toward Hispanics (stereotyping; conflation of racial, linguistic, and class issues in relations among Hispanics, other minority groups, and the English-speaking majority); and issues surrounding bilingualism.  Conducted in Spanish and English.  Students must have at least one year of college-level Spanish, and must have approval of instructor prior to registration.

 

CRN

94313

Distribution

B/D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

SPAN 302

Title

Interpretation of Hispanic Texts

Professor

Nicole Caso

Schedule

Mon Wed       11:30 am - 12:50 pm     OLIN 310

This course will provide an introduction to the literary analysis of texts-- novels, short stories, poetry, and essays from Latin America.  This course should serve as a preparation for more advanced courses in Spanish literature.  Attention will be paid to developing skills in reading and analytical writing.  Students will improve their spoken Spanish through class discussions and oral presentations.

 

RN

94185

Distribution

B/D  / * (Lit in English)

Course No.

SPAN / LIT 323

Title

Twentieth Century Latin-American Novel

Professor

Melanie Nicholson

Schedule

Tu   1:30 pm – 4:10 pm    OLIN 205   

With the publication of works such as Julio Cortázar's Rayuela [Hopscotch, 1963] and Gabriel García Márquez´s Cien años de soledad [One Hundred Years of Solitude, 1967], the Latin American novel achieved an international reputation and readership.  This course begins by analyzing several novels of the "Boom" period to determine the reasons behind their critical acclaim and popular appeal.  In particular, the phenomenon of magical realism is examined as a key element in the "globalization" of Latin American prose.  We will also read novels from the "post-Boom," examining the relationship of these works to theoretical articulations of postmodernism and feminism.  Authors may include Allende, Arenas, Asturias, Carpentier, Cortázar, Ferré, Fuentes, García Márquez, Peri Rossi, Puig, Skármeta, and Valenzuela. Conducted in English, with concurrent reading tutorial in Spanish.

 

CRN

94355

Distribution

B/D / * (FLLC)

Course No.

SPAN 339

Title

Staging Marriage in the Spanish Drama

Professor

Gabriela Carrion

Schedule

Mon Wed   3:00 pm – 4:20 pm   OLIN 306

Stanley Cavell describes marriage as “a certain willingness for bickering” that strikes him as “a little parable of philosophy or of philosophical criticism.” How do Spanish playwrights reenact this “parable of philosophy” in their works?  In what ways does the Spanish drama confirm or subvert the social conventions governing the institution of marriage? Why does wooing and wedding tend to be funny while being married inevitably lead to tragedy? Cuckolds, permanent bachelors (galán suelto), don Juans, educated women (culta latiniparla), wife murderers and defiant wives are some of the stock characters who are defined by their relationship to the conjugal bond.  This course will examine these characters and the questions raised by the insitution of marriage in the works of Lope de Rueda, Lope de Vega, Tirso, Cervantes, Calderón and Sor Juana, among others.  The final project includes a student performance of a dramatic work by one of these authors.