CRN

94147

Distribution

D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

LAT 101

Title

Elementary Latin I

Professor

Benjamin Stevens

Schedule

M Tu W Th    8:50 am -  9:50 am       PRE 101

A year-long introduction to the Latin language. Our goals are: (1) to gain familiarity with morphology, syntax, and essential vocabulary; (2) to achieve sufficient fluency for selected readings in ancient and medieval texts by the middle of the Spring term; and (3) to begin exploring the literary, cultural, and historical contexts in which the language is embedded. No knowledge of Latin required.

 

CRN

94272

Distribution

D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

LAT 201

Title

Intermediate Latin: Republican Rome

Professor

Benjamin Stevens

Schedule

TBA                        

A survey of early Roman literature focusing on the poetry of Catullus and the prose of Cicero and Caesar.  Open to all students who have completed Latin 102 or its equivalent.

 

CRN

94171

Distribution

D  / * (FLLC)

Course No.

LAT 301

Title

Advanced Latin – Lucretius’ De rerum natura

Professor

Benjamin Stevens

Schedule

Mon Wed       11:30 am - 12:50 pm     OLIN 107

Lucretius’ De rerum natura is one of the fullest surviving accounts of Epicurean philosophy and, equally, a work of astonishing artistic achievement. Our goals in approaching this difficult and rewarding poem are: (1)  to gain greater fluency in reading Latin and especially Latin poetry;(2) to consider from a variety of critical perspectives issues raised by the poem’s form and content; and (3)  to explore some of what it means to “do Classics”. Topics considered include Lucretius’ language and style; the poem’s structure, imagery, and themes; Epicurean and other ancient philosophies (including the “Lucretian question”, i.e. how and why write a poem about a philosophy opposed to poetry?); prehistory, anthropology, and evolution; contemporary Roman politics and society; and Lucretius’ impact on Roman and other poetries and the role played by his manuscript tradition in the development of textual criticism. We will read substantial sections of the poem in Latin, the entire poem in English, and modern scholarly works. 
Prerequisite: second-year knowledge of Latin.