*There is a per semester fee of $100.00 for students taking one or more Film classes. This fee aids in the cost of equipment and supplies.

 

CRN

94481

Distribution

A  */ (Analysis of Art)

Course No.

FILM 109

Title

Introduction to the History and Aesthetics of Film

Professor

Jean Ma

Schedule

Wed               10:00 am -  1:00 pm        

Tu                 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm     

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Films by Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, and Arnheim.

 

CRN

94235

Distribution

F  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 201 A

Title

Introduction to the Moving Image: Video

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

Schedule

Tu                 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm       

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to film and/or electronic motion picture production. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project in the Film and Electronic Arts Program.

Prerequisite: a 100 or 200- level course in Film or Video History.

 

CRN

94234

Distribution

F  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 201 B

Title

Introduction to the Moving Image: Video

Professor

Leah Gilliam

Schedule

Tu    10:00 am – 1:00 pm                   

See description above.

 

CRN

94236

Distribution

F  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 201 C

Title

Introduction to the Moving Image: Film

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

Schedule

Wed               1:30 pm -  4:30 pm      

See description above.

 

CRN

94237

Distribution

F  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 201 D

Title

Introduction to the Moving Image: Film

Professor

Peter Hutton

Schedule

Th                 1:30 pm -  4:30 pm      

See description above.

 

CRN

94243

Distribution

F */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 203

Title

Digital Animation

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

Schedule

Tu                 9:30 am - 12:30 pm     

Cross-listed: Integrated Arts

In this course we will make video and web-based projects using digital animation and compositing programs (Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects).  The course is designed to help students develop a facility with these tools and to find personal animating styles that surpass the tools at hand. We will work to reveal techniques and aesthetics associated with digital animation that challenge conventions of storytelling, editing, figure/ground relationship, and portrayal of the human form.  To this end, we will refer to diverse examples of animating and collage from film, music, writing, photography, and painting.

Prerequisite: familiarity with a nonlinear video-editing program.

 

CRN

94227

Distribution

F  */ (Analysis of Art)

Course No.

FILM 204

Title

Documentary History

Professor

Scott MacDonald

Schedule

Mon                    10:00 am -   1:00 pm                      

Screening: Sun    7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

The course provides a historical overview and critique of the documentary form, with examples from ethnographic film, social documentary, cinema verité, propaganda films, and travelogues. The class investigates the basic documentary issue of truth and/or objectivity and critiques films using readings from feminist theory, cultural anthropology, general film history/theory, and other areas.

 

CRN

94428

Distribution

B/F  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 211

Title

Introductory Scriptwriting Workshop

Professor

Marie Regan

Schedule

Tu                 1:30 pm -  3:50 pm      

An intensive workshop for committed writers/cineasts. From an idea to plot, from an outline to full script – character development and dramatic/cinematic structure. Continuous analysis of students’ work in a seminar setting. Students who wish to participate in this workshop should have a demonstrable background in film or in writing, and be able to share their work with others.

 

CRN

94230

Distribution

A / *(Analysis of  Art)

Course No.

FILM / IA 219

Title

Film & Modernism

Professor

John Pruitt

Schedule

Tu                          10:00 am -  12:50  pm                

Screening:  Mon      7:00  pm - 10:00 pm               

Cross-listed:  Integrated Arts

Operating on the assumption that the study of film, a syncretic art par excellence, offers a particularly advantageous perspective on understanding the aesthetic underpinnings of 20th Century art, the course explores the relationship between a certain mode of cinematic achievement, for the most part labeled avant-garde, and the major tenets of modernist art, both visual and literary. Many of the films studied are by artists who worked in other media (such as Léger, Strand, Cornell, and Duchamp) or whose work manifests a direct relationship to various artistic movements such as surrealism, futurism, and constructivism. An attempt is made to relate certain films to parallel achievements in photography, poetry, and music, with some attention paid to relatively little-seen filmmakers such as Lye, Kinugasa, and Jennings. Much of the assigned reading is not film criticism as such, but crucial critical works that help to define modernism in general, including those by Baudelaire, Pound, Ortega y Gasset, Moholy-Nagy, and Brecht. Other films studied are by (Europeans) Vertov, Eisenstein, Buñuel, Dulac, Ruttmann, Man Ray; and (American) Deren, Brakhage, Anger, Snow, Gehr, Conner, Rainer, Frampton, et al. Three take-home essay exams.

 

CRN

94240

Distribution

F / *(Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 223

Title

Graphic Film Workshop

Professor

Jennifer Reeves

Schedule

Wed               1:30 pm -  4:30 pm      

This course explores the materials and processes available for the production of graphic film or graphic film sequences. It consists of instruction in animation, rephotography, rotoscoping, and drawing on film and of viewing and discussing a number of films that are primarily concerned with the visual.

 

CRN

94233

Distribution

A  / *(Analysis of Art)

Course No.

FILM 228                         (Rethinking Difference)

Title

Women in Film

Professor

Nancy Leonard

Schedule

Fr                      10:30 am - 12:50 pm  

Screening:  Th    7:00 pm - 10:00 pm 

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies

Women behind and before the camera: the work of female directors from the beginnings of film to the present, and the work of representation that has constructed “the feminine” in film and within spectators. Readings will be drawn from film history and theory, especially the multiple forms of feminist criticism connecting the feminine to gender, sexuality, class and race. Active participation in discussion expected, and attendance at all screenings. Films to be studied will be drawn from both classical narrative cinema and independent film, and include work by Josef von Sternberg, Maya Deren, Alfred Hitchcock, Douglas Sirk, Yvonne Rainer, Chantal Akerman, Martine Attile, Tracey Moffett, and Julie Dash, among others.

 

CRN

94232

Distribution

A / *(Analysis of  Art)

Course No.

FILM 239

Title

Cinema of South Asia

Professor

Jean Ma

Schedule

Th                        10:00 am -   1:00 pm     

Screening: Wed     7:00 pm - 10:00 pm  

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies

The content covered by this survey will include Bollywood, the second largest commercial film industry in the world, art cinema, and diasporic cinema.  We will address thematic representations of gender, ethnicity, religion, colonialism, and nationalism in these films.  Moving beyond textual considerations, we will also consider South Asian cinema as a set of institutions and practices, in relation to other popular cultural and media discourses (such as television), with a view to how this cinema recasts the categories of genre, authorship, performance, and spectatorship.  Assignments include essays, short response papers, and an in-class exam.

 

CRN

94228

Distribution

F / *(Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 248

Title

Framing the Election

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

Schedule

Wed               9:30 am - 12:30 pm     

If a canon of film, video and new media exists, it includes provocative media made in response to presidential elections. Fiction and documentary works like Haskell Wexler’s “Medium Cool,” TVTV’s “Four More Years,” Robert Altman’s “Tanner 88” and “Nashville,” Jason Simon’s “Spin,” DA Pennebaker’s “War Room,” and RTMark’s “voteauction” and “gwbush.com” websites successfully capture the complex narratives and legacies of the last four decades’ election years. Designed to coincide with the months immediately prior and following the US presidential election in November, “Framing the Election” provides a structure for the course participant to capture, process, frame and produce some aspect of presidential politics in terms of one’s own personal experience. Following the chronology of the election, we will use the first two months of the semester to gather source material and consider texts produced out of prior elections. The latter part of the semester is dedicated to the production of films, videos, sound works or internet-based projects made in response to the results of this election. Works may reflect any political persuasion and take any form including documentary, diary, personal essay, fiction and music.

Prerequisite: a familiarity with and access to the tools one intends to use to produce work.

 

CRN

94239

Distribution

F */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 278

Title

Film Production Workshop

Professor

Jennifer Reeves

Schedule

Tu                 1:30 pm -  4:30 pm      

Who's to say "too many chefs spoil the meal?"  As this class functions as a rotating production team, the talent, imagination, and industry of each student will combine to create an original 16mm film.  The narrative will be styled by the class and each student will have an opportunity to write, direct, and edit a scene, acting as crew or cast in other scenes.  Issues of art direction, narrative continuity, and collaboration will be tackled as they arise.  The primary goal of the class is for students to develop their technical and story-telling proficiency through working in a variety of roles of a film production.

 

CRN

94241

Distribution

F  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 301

Title

Major Conference: Collage, Appropriation, Hacks

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

Schedule

Th                 1:30 pm -  4:30 pm      

This course surveys the history of appropriation in experimental media from the found footage, cut-up and collage films of the 1950's, the Lettrists and Situationists up to the current artistic and activist production efforts such as culture jamming, game hacking, sampling, hoaxing, resistance, interference and tactical media intervention.  The spectrum of traditions which involve the strategic reworking and recontextualizing of educational, industry and/or broadcast media sources, projects that detourn official 'given' meaning, the re-editing of outtakes, recycling of detritus, and a variety of works of piracy and parody which skew and subvert media codes will be examined for their artistic, poetic and political contribution to the field.  Specific class time will be devoted to the area of game patches, game hacks and videotapes based on gaming as an art practice with a lively and specific subculture, critical orientation and example of a flourishing alternative gift economy on the net.  Issues regarding gender, identity, media and net politics, technology, copyright and aesthetics will be addressed as raised by the work.  Students are required to write a research paper and/or produce their own videotape or game interventions as the requirements for the class specifies.  Open to non-majors. Email me at ahwesh@bard.edu before registration with questions.

 

CRN

94242

Distribution

F  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM / IA 301 B

Title

Major Conference: Multimedia Installation and Events

Professor

Leah Gilliam

Schedule

Mon               1:30 pm -  4:30 pm      

IA 301: Multimedia Installation and Events

This course charts a historical and critical framework for the term "multimedia" and in so doing provides source material and inspiration for the creation of projects that combine art forms and/or elude traditional categorization. Students will compose individual projects using video, slides, surveillance systems, mixers, switchers, projection systems and monitors. Through readings and screenings our discussions will examine issues of spectatorship, immediacy, interface design, spatial construction, time, boredom and performativity. Students will be encouraged to explore high and low tech solutions to their audio-visual desires and should be prepared to imagine the campus as their canvas.

 

CRN

94238

Distribution

C  */ (Practicing Art)

Course No.

FILM 307

Title

Major Conference: Landscape & Media

Professor

Peter Hutton

Schedule

Fr                  1:30 pm -  4:30 pm      

A class designed for Junior level film and video majors. The class will study and compare representations of the American landscape through the history of film and painting vs. the depiction of landscape and environmental issues manifest through television and video. Students will be required to complete a short film or video referencing these issues. Required reading: B. McKibbon’s The Age of Missing Information.