CRN

92110

Distribution

F

Course No.

LIT 121

Title

First Fiction Workshop

Professor

Mary Caponegro

Schedule

Fr 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 203


This course is for students who propose a commitment to writing and have already written stories or worked toward narrative text of any length. Also, reading of selected writers. Group response, analysis, and evaluation. Discussion of general principles. Candidates must submit samples of their work before registration with optional cover letter, via campus mail to Prof. Caponegro by 12:00 noon, Monday, August 26th.

CRN

92029

Distribution

B/F

Course No.

LIT 123 A

Title

First Poetry Workshop

Professor

Robert Kelly

Schedule

Mon Wed 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 101


This workshop is for students who strongly desire to experiment with making their own writing a means of learning, both about literature and poetry, and about the discipline of making works of art. Stress is on growth: in the student's own work, and in the individual's awareness of what sorts of activities, rhythms, and tellings are possible in poetry, and how poets go about learning from their own work. The central work of the course is the student's own writing, along with the articulation, both private and shared, of response to it. Readings will be undertaken in contemporary and traditional poets, according to the needs of the group, toward the development of familiarity with poetic form, poetic movement, and poetic energy. Attendance at various evening poetry readings and lectures is required. Candidates must submit samples of their work before registration with optional cover letter, via campus mail to Prof. Kelly by 12:00 noon, Monday, August 26th.

CRN

92030

Distribution

B/F

Course No.

LIT 123 B

Title

First Poetry Workshop

Professor

Robert Kelly

Schedule

Mon Wed 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 101


See description above.

Candidates must submit samples of their work before registration with optional cover letter, via campus mail to Prof. Kelly by 12:00 noon, Monday, August 26th.

CRN

92117

Distribution

B

Course No.

LIT 130

Title

Anna Karenina

Professor

Elizabeth Frank

Schedule

Wed 7:00 pm - 8:20 pm OLIN 202

Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 202


Students are introduced to the study of fiction through a semester devoted to a close reading of the novel. Discussion includes concepts of genre, convention, and style; the "rhetoric of fiction", and problems of narration. The conflict between morality and empathy and differences between novels of psychological analysis and novels of social criticism are discussed.

CRN

92094

Distribution

A/B

Course No.

LIT 2011

Title

Aesthetics of Narrative

Professor

Nancy Leonard

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm - 5:50 pm OLIN 202


A course between theory and literature, focused on three key issues about narrative and offering readings in both fiction and theory to address them. The course will also include regular writing of fiction and criticism in its view that invention and understanding are not divided. The course will first look at the construction of narrative voice and its role in relation to plot, reading stories by Poe, Dostoevsky and Faulkner and theory by Wayne Booth and Mikhail Bahktin. Then we will consider the place of the body as taken up in or represented by narrative, with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Samuel Beckett's Molloy and Marguerite Duras' The Lover, and by theorists Peter Brooks and Julia Kristeva. Finally, the question of history in relation to narrative will be explored with Michael Sharra's The Killer Angels (a novelization of the battle of Gettysburg), The Return of Martin Guerre by historian Natalie Zemon Davis, and theory by Hayden White and Catherine Gallagher. Interested students committed both to reading and to writing should consult Prof. Leonard before registration.

CRN

92313

Distribution

B/D

Course No.

LIT R210

Title

Body, Mind and Spirit in Dostoevsky

Professor

Marina Kostalevsky

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 107

Cross-listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies

An exploration of three dimensions of Dostoevsky's world. Particular attention paid to the way Dostoevsky experiments with the themes of body and sexuality, intellectual pursuit and philosophy, spiritual quest and religion. Readings include three short stories and two major novels: "Bobok," "A Gentle Creature," "Notes from the Underground," Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. Analysis of ideas, devices and structures of these texts supplemented by reference to major critical and theoretical writings. The course is meant to provide both an approach to Dostoevsky and to contemporary views of his art and prose as such. All readings and discussions in English.

CRN

92039

Distribution

F

Course No.

LIT 2106

Title

Writing Metrical Verse

Professor

Benjamin La Farge

Schedule

Mon Wed 9:00 am - 10:20 am OLIN 309


An introduction to some of the verse paradigms that make poetry in the English language one of the richest traditions in the world--the ballad, the sonnet, blank verse, nonsense verse, the ode, the song, the dramatic monologue, the villanelle, the sestina, the pantoum, etc. Students will learn how to read and write metrical verse by writing exercises in these forms, and by memorizing and reciting some classical poems as well. A particular concern will be the relation between meter and the speaking voice, but we will also consider different kinds of meter (accentual/syllabic, accentual, syllabic, and sprung rhythm). Still another concern will be the kinds of trope that distinguish classical (figurative) from modernist (elliptical) poetry.

CRN

92454

Distribution

A/F

Course No.

IA 2122 / LIT

Title

Exploding Text: Poetry Performance

Professor

Bob Holman

Schedule

Fr 11:00 am - 1:00 pm OLIN 101

Language is the essence of humanity; poetry is the essence of language. The reemergence of the oral tradition in the digital age has given an edge to word art which this course follows to the culture heart. Exploding Text is a hands-on exploration of a full-bodied literature, providing a theoretical basis for spoken word poetics via deep reading and analysis of text with a launch into physical analogues via performance practice. There is a microphone in the room. This semester we will concentrate on freestyle, thinking with tongue, and the epic poem, The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You by Frank Stanford. Hiphop, Dada, Futurism, New York School, Rock, Beat, Black Mountain and other traditions weave through the curriculum. We engage media other than print: video and audio recording, live music collaborations, poets theater, and the internet are all considered - visual artists are especially urged to apply. Students will participate in class collaborations with painters and musicians, and create a performance in at least two media as a final project. Several classes will be held at The Bowery Poetry Club in NYC, where we will be visited by a variety of NYC artists and have a chance to discuss their work with them.

CRN

92122

Distribution

B

Course No.

LIT 2139

Title

The African-American Tradition

Professor

Geoffrey Sanborn

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 307

Cross-listed: AADS

"The act of imagination is bound up with memory," Toni Morrison writes. If the space of memory is like the Mississippi River before it was straightened out to make room for houses and farms, then the act of imagination is the flooding that sends the waters back toward the places where the banks once were. From the late eighteenth century to the present, African-American writers have explored, in extremely powerful ways, the experience of being bound, the unbinding force of imagination, and the current that moves toward the lost banks of memory. In this course, we will study the fiction, poetry, autobiography, drama, essays, and speeches of writers ranging from Phillis Wheatley to Paul Beatty, paying particular attention to the dynamics of bondage, imagination, and memory, but ranging broadly through subjects like spirituality, lynching, sexuality, and "passing." Authors will include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Amiri Baraka, and Toni Morrison.

CRN

92104

Distribution

B/C

Course No.

LIT 215

Title

Victorian Essays & Detectives

Professor

Terence Dewsnap

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 205

Cross-listed: Victorian Studies

This course brings together some of the major Victorian essayists (who write on education, science, religion, politics) and writers of detective stories including Wilkie Collins, Arthur Conan Doyle, R. Austin Freeman and Israel Zangwill. The issues that the essayists raise are often relevant to the tendencies of the detective stories, especially their relatively realistic presentation of society and demonstration of empirical habits of mind. And the detective story, like most popular literature, reflects the images and problems and biases of its time to provide context for the essays.

CRN

92066

Distribution

B/F

Course No.

LIT 221

Title

Writers Workshop:Prose Fiction

Professor

Peter Sourian

Schedule

Tu 10:30 am - 12:50 pm ASP 302

Practice in imaginative writing. Students will present their own work for group response, analysis, and evaluation. Also reading of selected writers. Permission of the instructor is required. (Registration for this class was taken in May.)

CRN

92067

Distribution

B/F

Course No.

LIT 223

Title

Cultural Reportage

Professor

Peter Sourian

Schedule

Tu 4:00 pm - 6:20 pm ASP 302


For the self-motivated student interested in actively developing journalistic skills relating to cultural reportage, particularly criticism. The course stresses regular practice in writing reviews of plays, concerts, films, and television. Work is submitted for group response and evaluation. College productions may be used as resource events. Readings from Shaw's criticism, Cyril Connolly's reviews, Orwell's essays, Agee on film, Edmund Wilson's Classics and Commercials, Susan Sontag, and contemporary working critics. Enrollment limited, and by permission of the instructor, but not restricted to majors.

CRN

92097

Distribution

B/C

Course No.

LIT 227

Title

Ideology and Political Commitment in Modern Literature

Professor

Justus Rosenberg

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 204


We examine how political issues and beliefs, by they of the left, right, or center, are dramatically realized in literature. Works by Dostoyevsky, Ibsen, T.S. Eliot, Kafka, Thomas Mann, Brecht, Sartre, Malraux, Gordimer, Kundera, Neruda, and others are analyzed for their ideological content, depth of conviction, method of presentation, and the artistry with which these writers synthesize politics and literature into a permanent aesthetic experience. We also try to determine what constitutes the borderline between art and propaganda and address the question of whether it is possible to genuinely enjoy a work of literature whose political thrust and orientation is at odds with our own convictions. The discussions are supplemented by examples drawn from other art forms such as music, planning and film.

CRN

92312

Distribution

B/C

Course No.

LIT 235

Title

The Abbey Theatre

Professor

Terence Dewsnap

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 305

Cross-listed: Irish & Celtic Studies

Due to the force and conviction of William Butler Yeats and Lady August Gregory, the Abbey Theatre became the primary agent of cultural nationalism in Ireland in the early 20th century by recreating myths, legends, heroic deeds, folklore, and political history. This course follows the development of an Irish theatre with some attention to biographical, historical and dramatic contexts. If the Abbey successfully combined talent and opportunity, it also was the setting for various conflicts: art versus commercialism, politics versus art, Gaelicism versus cosmopolitanism, plays for popular audiences versus plays for the special few. We will read some controversial plays and some that were rejected by the Abbey and study the underlying currents in an evolution that was successful but conflicted. This course will provide an introduction to Irish Studies.

CRN

92114

Distribution

B/D

Course No.

LIT 270

Title

Rebels with(out) a Cause: Great Works of German Literature

Professor

Franz Kempf

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am LC 118


A survey of representative works of German literature from the eighteenth century to the present, from Goethe's Weltschmerz bestseller The Sufferings of Young Werther (1774) to Mother Tongue (1990), a collection of stories by Emine Sevgi Özdamar, a Turkish-German woman writer. Other authors include: Schiller, Eichendorff, Heine, Hauptmann, Wedekind, Rilke, Kafka, Thomas Mann, Brecht, Dürrenmatt, and Jelinek. Course conducted in English. Students with an advanced proficiency in German are expected to read the works in the original.

CRN

92028

Distribution

B/D

Course No.

LIT 280

Title

The Heroic Age

Professor

Mark Lambert

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 310

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies

This course focuses on the early vernacular literature of northern and western Europe: epic, saga, elegy. Particular attention is paid to the relation between Christian teachings and tribal memories among the Celts and Teutons, and to changing perceptions of individual identity. Background readings in history and anthropology, and study of representative English, Welsh, Irish, French, German, Spanish, and Scandinavian works.

CRN

92765

Distribution

B/C

Course No.

LIT 2811

Title

Contemporary Masters:Magris and Tabucchi

Professor

Norman Manea

Schedule

Tu 4:00 pm - 6:20 pm OLIN 304


In the series "Contemporary Masters" Bard's students are offered, in the fall 2002, "Italy on Hudson", the opportunity to meet two of the most important Italian and European writers, Claudio Magris and Antonio Tabucchi. Claudio Magris is considered a "maitre a penser" for European intellectual life of today. A profound and "multicultural" thinker on the inter-connections between Eastern, Central and Western European literature, masterly conveyed in his "Danube" book, he is also an original, appealing and great fiction writer, as shown in Microcosms, Inference from a Sabre, and A Different Sea, books of admirable artistry, richness and reflections, which will be discussed, with the participation of the author, in class. Antonio Tabucchi is the intriguing "magician" of the current Italian and European fiction. Author of many acclaimed short novels taut with suspense, he is an elegant and irresistible story-teller, confronting the contradictions and imminent implosion of modern democracy. A scholar of Portuguese literature and a traveler to far away placed (India, among others) he displays a worldly knowledge and vision. We will discuss with the author at least three of his books: Requiem, Pereira Declares, The Edge of Horizon. Both writers will provide a rare chance to debate essential cultural and political issues of our global environment and its many new, tense dilemmas. Interested students must send a letter to Prof. Manea by August 23, 2002, briefly outlining their background and the reason they would like to enroll in the class.

CRN

92107

Distribution

B

Course No.

LIT 286

Title

Radical Romanticism

Professor

Fiona Wilson

Schedule

Tu Fri 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm LC 210


British Romanticism may be described as the first counter-cultural movement in the English speaking world. This course explores the poetry, prose, and fiction that announced the radical aesthetics and politics of this era. Students will produce creative and critical responses to works by Blake, Coleridge, Wollstonecraft, the Wordsworths, Austen, Byron, Keats, the Shelleys, as well as Clare, Smith, and others.