JEWISH STUDIES

CRN

92281

Distribution

C

Course No.

JS 150

Title

From Brighton Beach to Broadway: American Jewish Culture in the Twentieth Century

Professor

Rona Sheramy

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 205

Cross-listed: American Studies, History, MES

Related interest: Religion

2 credits, This course will end in late October.

From film to literature, classical music to musical comedy, Jews have left an indelible imprint on twentieth-century American culture. This course asks: do these contributions constitute a distinctive American Jewish culture? Is there such a thing? Focusing on Jewish writers (Antin, Roth), filmmakers (from the Warner Brothers to Woody Allen), and composers and lyricists (Gershwin, Rodgers and Hammerstein), this course seeks to understand if there is something identifiably "Jewish" about the work of diverse twentieth-century artists and what their work says about the nature of ethnic culture in America. Special attention will be paid to the representation of race and ethnicity in film and theatre and the manner in which such representations reflect upon Jewish values and anxieties in America. We will situate our discussion in scholarly debates about Jewish culture, specifically, and American ethnic culture, more generally. Students with compelling interests may elect to extend their research beyond the module's end with an independent study project on American Jewish culture.

CRN

92282

Distribution

C

Course No.

JS 210

Title

History of the Holocaust

Professor

Rona Sheramy

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm LC 115

Cross-listed: History, MES

Related interest: Religion

2 credits, This course will end in late October.

This course will offer a historical overview of the Jewish experience in Nazi Germany. We will draw from a range of primary source materials, including wartime memoirs, diaries, films, and documents, as well as critical works of Holocaust scholarship. The course will explore central questions and debates surrounding the Nazi era, such as: how could the destruction of European Jewry be perpetrated by one of the most advanced and sophisticated European cultures? What was the relationship between Christian anti-Judaism and Nazi antisemitism? Why did German citizens accede to the Nazi extermination program? How did German Jews respond to the unfolding crisis? What were the experiences of other persecuted groups in Nazi Germany? And, what role did gender play in Nazi ideology and the experience of victims? Students with compelling interests may elect to extend their research beyond the module's end with an independent study project on Holocaust history.

Additional courses cross-listed with Jewish Studies:

HEB 101 - Beginning Hebrew

REL 257 - People of the Body