CRN

94459

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

SOC 101A

Title

Introduction to Sociology

Professor

Amy Ansell

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 202

Cross-listed: CRES

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the sociological perspective. Its goal is to illuminate the way in which social forces impinge on our individual lives and affect human society. The course is organized into four main parts. In the first, key sociological concepts and methods will be introduced via the study of the fathers of sociology: Durkheim, Weber, and Marx. In the second part, we will examine the significance of various forms of social inequality, particularly those based on class, race, and gender. We will then survey several important social institutions: the family, the economic order, the political order, education, and religion. The fourth and final part of the course will focus on the inter-related issues of ideology, social movements, and social change.

CRN

94729

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

SOC 117

Title

Identity and Social Structure

Professor

Lizabeth Zack

Schedule

Tue Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm HEG 300

From the Middle East to the world wide web, many pressing issues and controversies around the world today hinge on the question of identity. In this course, we examine the question of identity from various theoretical and analytical perspectives, and through different substantive cases and settings. We begin by comparing existing conceptions of identity and of the "collective" aspects of group and individual identities. From there, we explore why and how identities form, how they both affect and are affected by our actions, and the relationship between collective identities and the social and political contexts in which they exist. Throughout the course, we focus on the role of identity in shaping social divisions and conflicts, political movements, and contemporary organizations. In addition to examining the dynamics of racial, class and gender identities, we also look at national, religious, political, colonial and professional identities in different settings. Readings range from the classics of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and G.H. Mead, to more contemporary works by Judith Butler, Benedict Anderson, Gerard Noiriel, and Mahmood Mamdani. Some of the substantive topics we cover include racial hierarchies in the US and Africa, gender and sexuality, citizenship and immigration in France, religious nationalism, global workplaces, and community and the internet.

CRN

94209

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

SOC 203

Title

The History of Sociological Thought

Professor

Michael Donnelly

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 307

This course retraces the origins of modern social theory in the aftermath of the democratic revolutions in America and France and the capitalist Industrial Revolution in Britain. Readings are drawn in particular from the major works of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Simmel. The course thereby introduces many of the enduring themes of sociology: alienation and anomie; social disorganization and community; class conflict and solidarity; secularization and the decline of traditional religion; bureaucracy, division of labor, and professional expertise. The course aims to assess both the contributions of classical sociologists to subsequent social science, and their political or ethical aspirations to criticize, reform, or revolutionize modern society.

CRN

94210

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

SOC 207

Title

Deviance and Social Control

Professor

Michael Donnelly

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 303

All societies establish norms, and in all societies there seem to be individuals who violate norms and are sanctioned for doing so. Not all violations of norms, however, are sanctioned. The sociological study of deviance examines how certain people and behaviors come to be defined and labelled "deviant." The course explores three levels of analysis: who or what defines and identifies deviance? How do the labellers understand or explain the sources and causes of deviance? What are the consequences for deviants of being so identified and treated? Topics will include: mental illness and mental deficiency, opiate addiction, homosexuality and the politics of sexual preference, delinquency, child abuse, hyperactivity in children. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or permission of the instructor.

CRN

94460

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

SOC 210

Title

Sociology of Race

Professor

Amy Ansell

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 201

Cross-listed: AADS, American Studies, MES

Race continues to divide our social world and to shape our

sense of identity as individuals and as a nation. This course surveys recent work in the sociology of race, with a special focus on the progress and challenges of the post-civil rights era United States. Topics include: race theory, race and stratification, race identity and representation, trends in racial attitudes, race and politics, new racism, and the social construction of whiteness.

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or permission of instructor.

CRN

94470

Distribution

C

Course No.

SOC 315

Title

Sex, Love, Race and Beyond: Multi-ethnicity, Multi-raciality and the Mingling of American Peoples

Professor

Joel Perlmann

Schedule

Tu Th 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm OLIN 308

Cross-listed: American Studies and MES

Related interest: Jewish Studies

Throughout American history (and not least in today's and tomorrow's headlines), people of different ethnic or racial background have come together to form sexual unions (unions society has defined as legal marriages, as well as other unions, free or coerced) - and from these unions have emerged generations of multi-ethnic, or multi-racial, children. This course reviews the historical experience of these unions and children. Some of these unions (as between black and white) have been forbidden amalgamations until very recently. Other unions once very rare (and in some cases forbidden) have become routine, at least during the last generation (between Jews and Asians, for example, or between Italian-Americans and Mayflower descendants); the horror of one generation has become the banality of a later generation. In this course we will consider: 1)the laws, social thought, and imaginative literature that struggled to confront forbidden unions; 2)the way in which the topic of multiple origins has become banal for many ethnic (and recently racial) combinations; 3)the prevalence of different kinds of multi-ethnicity and multi-raciality, past and present; 4)the centrality of multi-ethnicity to the history of assimilation in America, and the creation of an American people and 5)some contemporary ways in which the topic is live in contemporary discussions of American public policy (e.g.: how the U.S. Census counts members of races or projects the nation's future racial composition; and how multi-raciality will affect affirmative action, voting rights legislation and the like). A seminar in which weekly reading and discussion are crucial; a term paper based on research will be the major writing assignment.

CRN

94461

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

SOC 328

Title

Power and Powerlessness

Professor

Amy Ansell

Schedule

Wed 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm OLIN 310

This course examines dynamics of power and powerlessness and how the two serve to maintain inaction in the face of injustice. We will investigate how patterns of power and powerlessness may limit action upon inequalities by preventing issues from arising, grievances from being voiced, and interests from being recognized. We will question the extent to which power may serve to shape conceptions about the nature and extent of the inequalities themselves. Finally, we will examine moments when power relations alter and rebellion emerges, in order to understand the ways in which resistance itself may feed back into patterns of power and powerlessness. Prerequisites: Moderated status in sociology or permission of instructor.