CRN

90131

Course No.

SOC 101 A

Title

Introduction to Sociology

Professor

Steven Colatrella

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 205

Distribution

A/C

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the sociological perspective. Its goal is to illuminate the way in which social forces impinge on our individual lives and affect human society. The course is organized into four main parts. In the first, key sociological concepts and methods will be introduced via the study of the fathers of sociology: Durkheim, Weber, and Marx. In the second part, we will examine the significance of various forms of social inequality, particularly those based on class, race, and gender. We will then survey several important social institutions: the family, the economic order, the political order, education, and religion. The fourth and final part of the course will focus on the inter-related issues of ideology, social movements, and social change.

CRN

90694

Course No.

SOC 101 B

Title

Introduction to Sociology

Professor

Steven Colatrella

Schedule

Mon Wed 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 205

Distribution

A/C

See description above.

CRN

90701

Course No.

SOC 117

Title

The Construction of Identities in Social Contexts

Professor

Laima Serksnyte

Schedule

Wed 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm Olin 205

Thurs 8:50 am - 9:50 am Olin 205

Distribution

C

Who am I? Who are we? This course intends to give students an enhanced understanding of the relationship between self and social structure, and therefore examines identity construction in various social contexts. Through a focus on concrete issues we will explore the basic structures and symbols people create and use to organize themselves and to construct their personal and collective identities, from small groups in face-to-face interactions, i.e. families, peer groups and cliques, to more complex hierarchical organizations such as formal bureaucracies. In discussing the negotiation of multiple identities we will examine selected case studies of racial, ethnic and national identities drawn from Eastern Europe, United States and other parts of the world to illustrate how change in large social structures and the transformation of social identities are mutually related. Students will be expected to write brief analytical essays on the readings and to produce a longer research paper based on their own or observed experience in a particular group or organization. Readings will include selections from Benedict Anderson, Blumer, Mead, Goffman, Garfinkel, Berger and Luckman, Gerth and Mills, Craig Calhoun, Georg Simmel, Max Weber, among others.

CRN

90133

Course No.

SOC 203

Title

History of Sociological Thought

Professor

Suzanne Vromen

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 203

Distribution

A/C

In this course we study how eminent thinkers have attempted to come to terms with the fundamental problems of the relationship between the modern individual and Western society in the aftermath of the French Revolution of 1789 and the development of capitalism. These problems include social atomization, alienation, and loneliness (Marx, Durkheim); social disorganization (Comte, Durkheim); secularization and the decline of traditional religious beliefs (Weber, Comte, Durkheim); a growing pessimism about the individuals capacity for rational control (Freud, Pareto); class conflict (Marx, Veblen); and other forms of conflict within society (Simmel, Pareto, and others). In analyzing how classical sociologists attempt to make sense of the complex and changing modern world, we will also consider how they search for a fair and just society and what they consider to be the promise of sociology in terms of both its potential as a humanistic discipline and its claims to be a science

 

CRN

90134

Course No.

SOC 221

Title

The Holocaust and the Dimensions of Evil

Professor

Suzanne Vromen

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm -5:50 pm OLIN 202

Distribution

A/C

Cross-listed: MES, Jewish Studies

An examination of the sociology of the Holocaust. Topics to be covered include the nature of anti-Semitism as a problem in the sociology of knowledge, evil as a sociological question, the social context of genocide, the social structure of the concentration camp, and the issues of resistance.

CRN

90356

Course No.

SOC/HIST 258

Title

Jews in American Society

Professor

Joel Perlmann

Schedule

Wed 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm OLIN 309

Th 4:40 pm - 6:00 pm OLIN 309

Distribution

C

Cross listed: American Studies, Jewish Studies, MES

This course will cover the history and contemporary sociology ofAmerican Jewry, concentrating on the period since 1880, when the great waves of east-European Jews immigrated to this country (a major event in the modern history of the Jews as well as in American ethnic life). Jewish social and cultural pattern since that date will be examined with an eye to what is distinctive about the patterns of this group -- compared to the patterns of other American immigrant, ethnic and religious groups, and what is shared in common with these groups. The course will consider the internal development of American Jewish religious and ethnic culture as well as the evolving place of Jews in the wider economic, social, intellectual and political milieu of the United States. A special focus will be the social and cultural worlds of the immigrant generation, first in eastern Europe and then in the United States. The course will try to strike a balance between readings by historians and social scientists, and voices from the period and people being studied.

CRN

90135

Course No.

SOC 303

Title

World Migration 1492-1999

Professor

Steven Colatrella

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 204

Distribution

C

This course will study migration from a planetary and historical perspective. Forced migrations such as the slave trade and indentured servitude, as well as the classic 19th- and 20th-century European migrations will be covered, along with the post-World-War-II migrations to the Persian Gulf, Europe, South Africa, and of course the United States. Capitalism and markets, states and labor forms, assimilation and multicultural identities will be examined. Prerequisites: moderated status or permission of instructor.