CRN

90028

Course No.

PSY 103 A

Title

General Introduction to Psychology

Professor

Frank Oja

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE 128

Distribution

E

The course is designed to be a broad survey of the academic discipline of psychology. The text for the course, and therefore the course, is organized around five main questions: How do humans (and, where relevant, other animals) act; how do they know; how do they interact; how do they develop; and how do they differ from each other? Students are responsible for learning the material in the text without an oral repetition of the material in class.

CRN

90328

Course No.

PSY 103 B

Title

General Introduction to Psychology

Professor

Tracie Stewart

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 304

Distribution

E

See description above.

CRN

90381

Course No.

PSY 103 C

Title

General Introduction to Psychology

Professor

Frank Scalzo

Schedule

Mon Th 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 306

Distribution

E

See description above.

CRN

90117

Course No.

PSY 111

Title

Introduction to Child Development

Professor

David Lopez

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 201

Distribution

C/E

This course is a survey course of childhood development. From a psychological perspective, we will examine the cognitive, social, and motor development of children from infancy through middle childhood. The course itself is divided into three sections. In the first section, we will introduce the psychological theories of cognitive, social and motor development, which will serve as the theoretical foundation of the course. We will also examine the biological and environmental underpinnings of development, prenatal development, and birth. The second section of the course will cover development in infancy, and the final section of the course will cover early and middle childhood development

CRN

90118

Course No.

PSY 141

Title

Introduction to Clinical Perspectives

Professor

Richard Gordon

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 301

Distribution

A/E

This course is intended to introduce the student to the concerns of clinical psychology, a branch of psychology that deals with the analysis of human psychological problems and efforts to remedy them. We will read a number of individual works that reveal how clinical theory evolves out of the unique intersection of personal experience, clinical observation and research. Writers will include, but not be limited to, such figures as Carl Rogers, Oliver Sacks, Hilde Bruch, Irving Yalom, Kay Jamison, and Martin Seligman. This course is open to first-year students, but enrollment will be limited.

CRN

90119

Course No.

PSY 203

Title

Introduction to Statistics and Research Design

Professor

Frank Oja

Schedule

Tu Fr 10:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE 128 LAB A: Tu 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm HCRC or

LAB B: Fr 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm HCRC

Distribution

E/G Q Course

This course is required before Moderation for psychology majors. The requirement of Psychology 203 and 204 cannot be met by courses taken elsewhere unless the student successfully passes tests based on these courses as they are taught at Bard. This is the first semester of a one-year, integrated course in applied statistics and research design and is offered only in the fall semester. In this semester we emphasize experimental research and parametric models, while the second-semester course focuses on correlational research and non-parametric models. The purpose of the year-long course is to prepare students to work seriously with quantitative data and to introduce them to the fundamental concepts of research design. The first semester includes elementary descriptive and inferential statistics from t-tests through contrasts and the analysis of covariance. It covers the rationale of basic concepts, their application, and the presentation of the results of statistical analyses; the fundamentals of the logic of experimental design and methods for controlling the effects of relevant variables; and enough computer usage to permit use of experimental software programs and independent use of the SPSS/PC+ statistical analysis package. In addition, we will use a segment of the PBS tele-course "Against All Odds" as an introduction and warm-up activity for most class meetings. Any student planning a concentration in psychology must have adequate mathematical skills (basic arithmetic and algebra) before enrolling in this course. Those with a weakness in basic mathematics should enroll in appropriate courses during their freshman year.

CRN

90329

Course No.

PSY 219

Title

Intergroup Relations: Cultural, Political and Interpersonal Perspectives

Professor

Tracie Stewart

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 304

Distribution

C/E

Cross-listed: MES

Related interest: Gender Studies

In this course, students examine relations between various racial, ethnic, religious, and gender groups in the U.S. and in other cultures from the point of view of psychological theory, method and knowledge. The determinants of intergroup relations in neighborhoods, schools, work settings, and communities are studied, and we explore how prejudice and discrimination between groups can ultimately lead to large-scale social conflicts such as revolution, extreme violence and hatred, war, and genocide. Strategies for promoting harmony and equality, and for resolving disputes, between groups are considered.

CRN

90364

Course No.

PSY 226

Title

Social Psychology and Human Aggression: Applied Theories and Analysis

Professor

David Lopez

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm PRE 128

Distribution

C/E

There is little doubt that violence, on an individual and group level, is one of the most pressing social problems of our time. Social Psychology has studied human aggression for much of the past 60 years. How do we explain aggression, violence, war, murder? This course is an upper-level Psychology course focusing specifically on social psychological and social interactionist models of human aggression. We will discuss theories and relevant empirical research. An emphasis of the course will be on the applied forensic utility of these normative models. That is, how can these models be used to understand criminal aggressive behavior? We will focus specifically on two types of criminals: serial murderers and serial child sex offenders. Some background in general or social psychology is expected and permission of the instructor is required.

CRN

90380

Course No.

PSY 230

Title

Introduction to Neuroscience

Professor

Frank Scalzo

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 203

Distribution

E

The ability to express thoughts and emotions, and to interact with the environment, is dependent in large part on the function of the nervous system. This course will examine basic concepts and methods in the study of brain, mind and behavior. Topics include the structure and function of the central nervous system, brain development, learning and memory, emotion, sensory and motor systems, the assessment of human brain damage, and clinical disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease.

Prerequisite: Intro. to Psychology or Introductory Biology

CRN

90123

Course No.

PSY 320 RC (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Controversies in Social Cognition: Attitudes and Attitude Change

Professor

David Lopez

Schedule

Th 1:30 pm -3:50 pm PRE 101

Distribution

E/C

Since Thurstone's paper "On Attitudes" published in the 1930s, psychologists have been empirically investigating the structure, nature, and functions of our most deeply cherished beliefs. There are few areas in contemporary social cognition which have been fraught with more controversy, debate and empirical innovation. This major conference will examine the historical roots through to contemporary models of attitudes and attitude change. Specific questions to be addressed include: What is an attitude? How is it organized? How can one measure it? Are all attitudes the same? Do attitudes directly influence behavior? Does behavior directly influence attitudes? Why are strongly held personal beliefs so resistant to change? Are contemporary models of attitude formation and change adequate? This course will have a strong emphasis on empirical investigations. Familiarity with both quantitative and qualitative research methods and inferential statistics is essential. Open to students moderated in psychology. Fulfills one research conference requirement in Psychology

CRN

90121

Course No.

PSY 342 RC (Upper College Seminar)

Title

New Directions in Psychopathology

Professor

Richard Gordon

Schedule

Tu 9:00 am - 12:00 pm PRE 101

Distribution

E

This course will focus on the evolution of psychiatric paradigms throughout the 20th century and attempt to evaluate where we are in the field of psychopathology research. We will be especially interested in the evolution of cognitive-behavioral and biological views of mental disorder and the decline of the psychodynamic/developmental view that was once dominant in the field. We will approach the subject matter through the examination of specific research on such conditions as panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and mood disorders, as well as some larger works that examine critically the strengths and limitations of dominant paradigms. Students will be required to write a number of short critiques of research articles and these will form the basis of class discussions. This is a research conference specifically designed for students who have moderated in psychology and have taken PSY 241 (Abnormal Psychology).

CRN

90379

Course No.

PSY T300 DL

Title

Applied Research Practicum: The Astor Home for Children

Professor

David Lopez

Schedule

by arrangement

Distribution

E

This tutorial will offer moderated Psychology students with interests in development, child psychopathology, community mental health, and applied community psychology the opportunity to participate in research projects conducted on-site at the Astor Home for Children. The course will be co-supervised by Professor Lopez and Dr. Suzanne Button of the Astor Home. Class size is limited to 10 students. Please see the instructor before registration to discuss the class.