CRN

90025

Course No.

PS 113

Title

Chasing Progress

Professor

Sanjib Baruah

Schedule

Wed Fr 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 202

Distribution

C

The study of economic development of the Third World has gone through several intellectual phases. The first generation of scholars viewed the process somewhat optimistically as the global extension of modernity or capitalism. Neo-Marxist critics tried to locate Third World underdevelopment in the history of colonialism and in the persistence of structures of dependency of Third World countries. There is now a tendency to get away from general theories of development or underdevelopment and to distinguish among various paths to progress. The scholarly uncertainties reflect dilemmas facing development planners. Although development has produced many gains, it does not automatically improve people's conditions, and sometimes segments of the poor even lose their traditional entitlements during the process of development. Yet no one has made a persuasive case for ameliorating poverty and hunger without development. The course will introduce students to problems of Third World development and to debates on development among scholars and development planners.

CRN

90495

Course No.

PS 122

Title

Institutions, Processes and Politics in American Government

Professor

Joseph Luders

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30am - 12:50 pm OLIN 204

Distribution

C

This course introduces students to the basic institutions and processes of American government. The class is meant to provide students with a grasp of the fundamental dynamics of American politics and the skills to be an effective participant in and critic of the political process. During the semester, we will take apart how the government works, make sense of current political questions, and learn about how to influence the government at various levels.

CRN

90026

Course No.

PS 153

Title

Latin American Politics

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm -4:20 pm OLIN 205

Distribution

C

Cross Listed: LAIS

This course examines political life in Latin America in the postcolonial period. The course covers the entire region but emphasizes the most representative countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru. The overarching purpose of the course is to understand change and continuity in this region. We will endeavor to accomplish this by emphasizing both the historical development of institutions and political actors in Latin America (e.g. the state, capital, labor, the church, the military) as well as the variety of theoretical frameworks that scholars have constructed to understand the dynamics of political development throughout the region (e.g. modernization, dependencia, and political culture). Among the major themes covered in the course are the legacies of European colonialism, state building, revolution, corporatism and populism, military rule, and redemocratization. Open to all students.

CRN

90503

Course No.

PS 224

Title

The Evolution of Work

Professor

Oren Levin-Waldman

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm LC 120

Distribution

C

Work has long been a core value underpinning the American political system. It has formed the basis for defining who belongs - who may rightfully make claims to citizenship - and it has also formed the basis around which society would be structured and even stratified. This course traces the evolution of work and how that evolution parallels the evolution of the American polity and its welfare state. We will examine the concept of work and its various constructions in the development of wage labor, living wages, general employment policy and other labor market policies. We will also look at the evolution of labor law and the union movement. Lastly, we will examine how the concept of work is used (and abused) today in partisan politics.

CRN

90496

Course No.

PS 232

Title

Social Movements and Political Change: Labor, Race and Gender in America

Professor

Joseph Luders

Schedule

Wed Fri 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 201

Distribution

C

This course considers three general questions: What accounts for the emergence of social movements? What explains their development and decline over time? And, finally, why have some movements succeeded in shaping American politics while others have failed? Looking at the labor movement, the civil rights movement, and the women's movement, we will investigate the conditions for successfully affecting the American politics and policy. Particular attention is paid to movement tactics and the changing structure of political coalitions.

CRN

90169

Course No.

PS 241

Title

Late Modern Political Theory: Knowledge and Organization

Professor

David Kettler

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm -5:50 pm OLIN 203

Distribution

A/C

Since the end of the nineteenth century, political theory has been influenced by its confrontation with the question whether politics can be reduced to a science. Conflicting theories share common features. First, late modern approaches are strongly marked by attention to social theory, the intellectual project centered on problems of modern rationality. Second, conceptions of political knowledge are closely linked to conceptions of organization (and the fear of disorganization). Earlier emphases on justice and authority are overshadowed by questions about the intelligence of political rule. The course will compare major nineteenth- and twentieth-century proposals for institutionalizing rationality in the political system including Mill, Engels/Marx, Weber, Mannheim, Dewey, Marcuse and Habermas, as well as some outstanding critics of the project, including Nietzsche, Hayek, and Foucault.

CRN

90027

Course No.

PS 249

Title

Dreams of Perfectibility, Part I: The Quest for a Moral Foreign Policy from Jefferson to Wilson

Professor

James Chace

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 202

Tu 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 305

Distribution

C

PIE Core Course

From the early days of the Republic, America's intense drive for absolute security has shaped our history and national character. Americans have, of course, gone to war for a variety of specific reasons--to expand their territory for economic gain, in response to affronts to their national honor and territorial integrity, to secure their nation's role as the guardian of freedom and the promoter of democratic values. Moreover, the overarching response to America's need to counter real or imagined foreign threats has been the use of unilateral action as the surest method of achieving national security. But American foreign policy has always been justified by appeals to American exceptionalism. America as an exemplar or as a crusader--these are the moral poles of U.S. foreign policy. Yet no American foreign policy can be successful in long term without a moral component. Should America have a democratizing mission? What are the consequences of this search for perfectionism in an imperfect world?

CRN

90690

Course No.

PS 256

Title

Politics and News Media

Professor

Jonathan Becker

Schedule

Tu 11:30 am - 12:50 pm LC 118

Fri 11:30 am - 12:50 pm LC 208

Distribution

C

PIE Core Course

This seminar course examines broad questions about the relationship between the news media and politics. It addresses the interaction between government and news media, concentrating on the characteristics of different media systems, the role of news media in elections and the impact of news media on the formation of foreign and domestic policy. It also focuses on the impact of corporate ownership on news media, claims and counter-claims of liberal and conservative bias, and the emergence of new media technologies. It primarily addresses contemporary news media in the United States, although significant attention will be devoted to other national systems and historical periods.

CRN

90114

Course No.

PS 314 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

The Politics of Globalization

Professor

Sanjib Baruah

Schedule

Th 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 301

Distribution

C

Economic globalization along with new telecommunications and computer networks have in recent years weakened the authority of states over their territories. While territorial states are alive and well, the notion of state sovereignty and the ability of governments to influence a nation's economy, culture and society has eroded. This decline may not be as apparent in the case of powerful states such as the United States. But among less powerful states many, for instance, have to make economic policy with an eye to how the bond-rating agency Moody's rates its bonds and the International Monetary Fund assesses the health of its economy. Ministries of culture are more worried than ever about the penetration of their airwaves by global media networks. Powerful states have not escaped this trend of declining authority. They may, for instance, welcome the movement of capital that globalization entails but not the movement of people. Yet traditional tools of immigration control are no longer adequate to control the transnational movement of people in the age of globalization. The course will examine the issues of global governance in this age of the declining authority of the territorial state. We will look at what is new about globalization--the transnational flow of ideas, images, finance and people in our times--, and the authorities of "global governance" such as the International Monetary Fund and global credit agencies. If a "system" of global governance is emerging, is there much in the way of an opposition that could make this "system" more accountable? We will look at the potential of activist global organizations--e.g. human rights organizations and environmental organizations--to play an oppositional role.

CRN

90115

Course No.

PS 404 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Power Politics

Professor

James Chace

Schedule

Wed 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 304

Distribution

C

The "realist" tradition in international relations has long been central to the method by which rulers and policymakers deal with the foreign policy of the state. This is an upper-level seminar that will concentrate on analyzing the classic works of the so-called realist tradition. Readings will include Thucydides, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Hume, Bolingbroke, Locke, Lorenzo dei Medici, Harold Nicolson, Henry Kissinger, Alexander Hamilton, David Fromkin, Woodrow Wilson, George Kennan, Fareed Zakaria and Hans Morgenthau. Theory will be combined with an historical study of power politics from 1815 to 1940. In this context, we will examine the exercise of the balance of power in Europe as against the Wilsonian universalism in 20th-century America. Prerequisites: Introductory courses in political studies or philosophy, or studies in modern European history.

CRN

90497

Course No.

PS 412 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Identities and Institutions in American Political Development

Professor

Joseph Luders

Schedule

Tues 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm OLIN 307

Distribution

C

CHANGE This course will be taught in the spring semester.
Compared to other advanced industrial democracies, the United States has been called a `welfare state laggard.' This characteristic has decisively shaped the development of American politics. This course evaluates the various explanations for "American exceptionalism" including those highlighting the importance of liberal consensus, racial and ethnic divisions within the working-class, business counter-mobilization, and state repression. We will assess these explanations by surveying the political mobilization of the Left and Right in American politics from the late nineteenth century to the present. This evaluation will involve an analysis of the construction of political identities, the mobilization of these identities, and the shaping role of political institutions.

CRN

90116

Course No.

PS 413 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Politics of New Democracies

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

Schedule

Wed 1:30 pm -3:50 pm OLIN 308

Distribution

C

Since the mid-1970s, over forty nations in Europe, Latin America, Africa and Asia have exited authoritarian rule and inaugurated democratic government, occasioning a global democratic revolution of unprecedented proportions. The rise of open and competitive political systems in parts of the world once seemingly condemned to dictatorship raises at least two critical questions to students of political development in general and democracy in particular. What accounts for the triumphant rise of democracy at the end of the twentieth century? And what are the prospects for democratic consolidation among fledgling democracies? These questions provide the anchor for this seminar on the politics of democratization. They frame a wide range of issues and theoretical questions in the study of the politics of democratization such as whether democracy is the outcome of material prosperity or skillful political actors, which kinds of political institutions and arrangements are best suited to a new democracy, how democratizing societies settle the legacies of repression of the retreating authoritarian regime, and the links between democratization and political violence. The cases covered by the seminar include Spain, Argentina, Russia and South Africa. Open to students with a background in the social sciences.