CRN

90020

Course No.

PHIL 101

Title

Introduction to Philosophy: Problems in Philosophy

Professor

William Griffith

Schedule

Tu Fr 1:30 pm -2:50 pm ASP 302

Distribution

A

An introduction to the problems, methods, and scope of philosophical inquiry. Among the philosophical questions to be discussed are those associated with morality, the law, the nature of mind, and the limits of knowledge. Philosophers to be read include Plato, Descartes, David Hume, William James, A. J. Ayer, Sartre, C. S. Lewis, and Lon Fuller.

CRN

90021

Course No.

PHIL 103

Title

Introduction to Philosophy: History of Philosophy

Professor

Garry Hagberg

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm -4:20 pm OLIN 203

Distribution

A

Related interest: French Studies

A critical examination of the work of some major figures in the history of philosophy, emphasizing historical continuities and developments in the subject. Authors include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Nietzsche, and Russell.

CRN

90022

Course No.

PHIL 106

Title

Introduction to Philosophy: Reality, Knowledge and Value

Professor

Robert Martin

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 202

Distribution

A

An introduction to some key issues in three of the main areas of Western philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology and value theory. Readings in each area will be drawn from the classical and modern traditions: for example, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, and Bertrand Russell. In all cases we will attempt to see the connections between the traditional problems of philosophy and the concerns of our own lives.

CRN

90499

Course No.

PHIL 261

Title

Plato

Professor

William Griffith

Schedule

Tu Fri 10:00 am - 11:20 am LC 206

Distribution

A

Cross-listed: Classical Studies

An introduction to Plato. Issues considered include the search for and illustration of a philosophical way of life; the ethics of living and dying; teaching values; love; rhetoric; and philosophy. Readings include: Euthyphro, The Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Meno, Phaidrus, The Symposium, Gorgias, Protagoras, Parmenides, and The Republic. (These selections may be adjusted according to the backgrounds and interests of the class.)

CRN

90023

Course No.

PHIL 357 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Law and Ethics

Professor

William Griffith/Alan Sussman

Schedule

Wed 1:30 pm -3:50 pm OLIN 310

Distribution

A

This course will combine elements of two disciplines, law and philosophy, and will be taught jointly by a member of the philosophy program and a constitutional lawyer. Issues to be studied, broadly conceived, include justice, equality, liberty, and responsibility. More specifically, these will include affirmative action, sexuality, the death penalty, the right to die, and the insanity defense. We shall study opinions of justice of the United States Supreme Court, and judges on Circuit Courts, as well as works by philosophers, including Aristotle, J. S. Mill, John Rawls, H. L. A. Hart, Lon Fuller, Isaiah Berlin, and Ronald Dworkin. Enrollment limited to 15. Permission of instructor required. Priority for admission will be given to students with upper-college standing and/or a previous course in philosophy.

CRN

90024

Course No.

PHIL 371 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

The Philosophy of Kant

Professor

Garry Hagberg

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm HEG 300

Distribution

A

Cross-listed: German Studies

A close examination of The Critique of Pure Reason, along with a number of secondary readings on this foundational work of modern philosophy. We will consider in detail the analytical/synthetic distinction, the a priori and the a posteriori, the method of transcendental argument and the ideas of space, time, and causality, the categories of perception, subjectivity and knowledge of the self, the possibility of knowledge beyond experience, and competing arguments pertaining to the soul, infinity, the ontological argument, and free will. At the end of the course we will attempt a synthesis of these issues, providing a larger view of Kant's metaphysics of experience. Prerequisites: a previous course in philosophy and permission of the instructor.