COLLEGE AND COMMUNITY ENSEMBLES

Each ensemble is for one credit. It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly. If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble, one more credit may be added.

CRN

90189

Course No.

MUS 105

Title

Bard College Community Chorus

Professor

Luis Garcia-Renart

Schedule

Th 7:00 pm -9:15 pm BARD HALL

Distribution

F

 

CRN

90188

Course No.

MUS 104

Title

Ensemble: Orchestra

Professor

Joan Tower

Schedule

Mon 4:30 pm -6:30 pm OLIN

Distribution

F

 

CRN

90192

Course No.

MUS 108 D

Title

Vocal Ensemble A

Professor

Joan Tower

Schedule

Mon 7:00 pm -9:15 pm BARD HALL

Distribution

F

 

CRN

90193

Course No.

MUS 108 D

Title

Vocal Ensemble B

Professor

Joan Tower

Schedule

Tu 7:00 pm -9:15 pm BARD HALL

Distribution

F

CRN

90354

Course No.

MUS 108 B

Title

Ensembles: Contemporary

Professor

Joan Tower

Schedule

Tu 10:00 am - 12:00 pm BLM HALL

Distribution

F

 

CRN

90191

Course No.

MUS 108 C

Title

Ensembles: Wind & Brass

Professor

Patricia Spencer

Schedule

Tu 7:00 pm -9:00 pm BLM 117

Distribution

F

 

CRN

90194

Course No.

MUS 108 F

Title

Ensembles: Jazz

Professor

TBA

Schedule

Mon 7:00 pm -9:00 pm BLM HALL

Distribution

F

 

CRN

90195

Course No.

MUS 108 G

Title

Ensembles: Chamber

Professor

Luis Garcia-Renart

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

F

 

CRN

90196

Course No.

MUS 108 H

Title

Ensembles: Balinese Gamelan

Professor

Ni Ketut Suryatini

Schedule

Tu 7:00 pm -9:00 pm

Distribution

F

COURSES:

CRN

90171

Course No.

MUS 133

Title

Fundamentals of Music I

Professor

Luis Garcia-Renart

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm -5:50 pm BLM 117

LAB: Wed 4:30 pm -5:30 pm BLM 117

Distribution

F

This course explores the elements of music-making through analysis, composition, and performance.

CRN

90172

Course No.

MUS 171

Title

Jazz Harmony I

Professor

TBA

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm BLM 117

Distribution

F

This course will help students identify and understand chords that are commonly used in 12 and 16 bar blues. Early jazz will be studied. We will focus on the following pianists: Earl Hines, Fats Waller, and Lil Harden.

CRN

90174

Course No.

MUS 215

Title

Topics in the History of Music: Franz Liszt and the Romantic Century

Professor

Kyle Gann

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm -4:20 pm OLIN 104

Distribution

A/C

Franz Liszt was the central musician of the 19th century. He lived long enough to receive encouragement from an 18th century composer - Beethoven - and to give it to a 20th century composer - Debussy. Inventor of the symphonic poem, he wrote the century's best oratorio, its most difficult piano music, the first explicitly atonal work, and music so avant-garde that it wasn't published until 70 years after it was written. He lived a life of endless scandal, yet in old age fulfilled a childhood dream by taking holy orders. He was the pivotal figure in the "War of the Romantics", whose aesthetic antagonisms resonate down to the present day. He invented modern piano technique, changed the way orchestras are conducted, and performed some of the first researches in ethnomusicology. Yet his own underestimated music has often fallen victim to the controversies that swirled around him. Through Franz Liszt's eyes and ears we can examine every nook and cranny of the 19th-century musical life. This course is built around the recent, splendid, three-volume biography of Liszt by Alan Walker. We will study not only Liszt's own mammoth output, but those of the composers closest to him: from famous ones like Chopin and Wagner to minor but illuminating figures like Henselt, Raff, Mosonyi, and even Liszt's women composer proteges Ingeborg Starck and Sophie Menter.

CRN

90175

Course No.

MUS 228

Title

Renaissance Counterpoint

Professor

Kyle Gann

Schedule

Tu Fr 10:00 am - 11:20 am BLM 117

Distribution

A/C

In the good old days, when J. S. Bach was young, the study of music composition was the study of counterpoint. It was still true a century later when Beethoven studied with Haydn, and just as true another 140 years later when Conlon Nancarrow studied with Roger Sessions. A knowledge of counterpoint imparts fluidity to a composer's music; one can often tell composers who haven't studied counterpoint, because they write in self-contained blocks and frequently say, "I don't know what to do next." The exacting discipline of 16th century counterpoint teaches a composer to see musical problems in terms of multiple possible solutions, and helps the student internalize Schoenberg's dictum that "the eraser is the important end of the pencil." Even for those who don't compose, counterpoint reveals, strand by strand, the DNA that made the great art of European classical music take the shape it did. This course will pursue good old species counterpoint following Knud Jeppesen's classic text, Counterpoint, yet based not so much on smooth Palestrina style as on the more forceful works of Josquin Desprez. A liberal, analytical sprinkling of 16th century motets and mass movements by Josquin, di Lasso, Willaert, and others will keep our eyes and ears focused on the sumptuously perfect art that counterpoint made possible.
Prerequisite: ability to read music and familiarity with intervals.

CRN

90176

Course No.

MUS 240

Title

Introduction to Experimental and Electronic Music

Professor

David Behrman

Schedule

Wed 1:30 pm -3:50 pm BLM HALL

Distribution

F

Beginning early in the 20th Century with the radical innovations of such revolutionary figures as Charles Ives, Henry Cowell, Edgar Varese and Ferdinand 'Jelly Roll' Morton, various experimental music traditions will be examined. In addition to studying the body of works these traditions have produced and discussing their cross-fertilizations and aesthetic and philosophic underpinnings, students will be encouraged to actively realize and perform pieces by some of the composers studied. Examples of possible performance projects: Ives's quartertone pieces; Cowell's piano music; graphic scores by Feldman, Brown and Cardew; chance and indeterminate scores by Cage; Fluxus event pieces by Yoko Ono and Kosugi; meditation pieces by Pauline Oliveros; "In C" by Terry Riley; "Rainforest" by David Tudor; game pieces by Christian Wolff, etc. This course is expected to be taken as a prerequisite for all Electronic Music Studio courses.

CRN

90177

Course No.

MUS 242

Title

New Computer Music Techniques

Professor

David Behrman

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

A

Recent leaps in technology have opened fresh vistas in the fields of computer music and digital audio. Some new and fascinating software environments have appeared very recently, and these can be explored for the first time on today's personal computers. This course will mainly be devoted to a hands-on exploration of Max/MSP, an environment that, because of its relative ease of use and flexibility, is attracting artists interested in interactive music, algorithmic composition and the design of sound and multimedia installations. The course will also touch on other innovative music software environments currently under development, such as Supercollider and Soundhack. The fundamentals of digital audio processing will be studied, and some of the history of music software and literature since the dawn of the microcomputer era will also be examined.

CRN

90705

Course No.

MUS 279

Title

Millennium of Music: 1000CE - 2000CE

Professor

Frederick Hammond

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm Blum 117

Distribution

A/C

This user-friendly course provides a survey of Western art music from 1000 CE to 2000 CE. It is intended for the lower-college general student with no necessary musical background. The course has three aims: the presentation of significant moments in music history in their historical context; the examination of major masterpieces; and the acquisition of basic musical skills and terminology.

CRN

90177

Course No.

MUS 302 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Advanced Analysis Seminar

Professor

Kyle Gann

Schedule

Fr 1:30 pm -3:50 pm BLM 117

Distribution

A

A course in advanced analytical techniques. The entire semester will be devoted to in-depth analysis of two, or at the most three, works from the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis will be placed not on harmonic analysis (even in 19th century works), but on how networks of motives are used to generate overall structure; this is a search for the essence of large-scale compositional thinking. The student will complete his or her own analysis paper on a work related to the music analyzed in class. Possible works for this semester (though subject to change): Ludwig van Beethoven, Grosse Fuge; Igor Stravinsky, Piano Concerto; Morton Feldman, Turfan Fragments.
Prerequisite: Analysis of the Classics of Modernism or Romantic Harmony, and permission of the instructor.

CRN

90178

Course No.

MUS 305 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Tous les matins du monde:French Musical Culture from Louis XIV to the Revolution

Professor

Frederick Hammond

Schedule

Th 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 104

Distribution

C/D

A seminar on French music 1647-1789 in the social, political and intellectual context of the ancien regime. We will consider court ballet, the introduction of Italian opera, their employment as a political tool, and the development of tragedie lyrique and comic opera in the hands of Lully, Rameau, Gluck, Gretry, and others; French keyboard and instrumental music, especially that of Francois Couperin and the viol composers; and the sacred music of Lully, Charpentier, and Rameau. Related readings will include such writers as Saint-Simon, Rousseau, and Diderot. A reading knowledge of French is desirable; no technical knowledge of music is required.

CRN

90179

Course No.

MUS 307 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Music:High Culture, Low Culture, Popular Culture; an economic/aesthetic history of the musical uses of leisure time in 20th century America

Professor

Benjamin Boretz

Schedule

Th 10:30 am - 12:50 pm BLM 101

Distribution

C

It is a belief that what is known today as 'popular culture' is a singular phenomenon of 20th-century America, emerging as the output of growing and spreading affluence and the consequent need to fill leisure time. American 'popular culture' in this sense may have had its unique predecessor in the Troubadour culture of 12th-century Languedoc. This project tracks a series of economic/cultural groups as they create markets for various forms of musical diversion, each form serving to identify and articulate the self-image of each group. Apart from the 'high' culture's emblematic rituals of opera, symphony, and chamber music, whose progress through this period we follow in parallel with other developments, a primary focus is on musical forms drawing their sustenance in seemingly inexhaustible ways from the wellspring of African-American musical cultures, beginning with blues, ragtime, minstrelsy, musical theater, marches, and early "jazz" ( which later in its lifetime has spanned the gamut from the area between low and popular culture to the area between popular and high culture), dwelling considerably on the literature of sophisticated urban jazz-based popular-song music (1905-1950), and following the socio-economic-aesthetic configuration leading from rock 'n' roll to rock to disco, and beyond. The belated discovery in high-art culture of the experiential and musical possibilities available in real-time interactive situations (improvisation) and non-formal expressive situations in another far-reaching development originating in the example of African-American musical practices. Other tracks include the evolution of country music, urban blues, gospel, 'R&B', soul, (Motown), rap, 'avant-garde' jazz, and various appropriations and domestications of original black jazz forms by groups within the dominant culture. Still another track is the history of modern technology, which creates leisure time as well as new ways to use it; the evolution of popular culture is inseparable from that of media technology. In all cases, the relation of lifestyle (including fashions of dress and forms of congregation) to social imagery and musical forms (which also essentially include other expressive media such as dance) is regarded as intrinsic to this study.

MUSIC WORKSHOPS

CRN

90182

Course No.

MUS WKSH

Title

Workshop: Ear Training I

Professor

TBA

Schedule

Tu 11:30 am - 12:50 pm BLM 117

LAB: Fr 11:30 am - 12:50 pm BLM 117

Distribution

F

Two Credits. This workshop is designed to help music majors learn to hear in their heads what they see on the page, to sing what they hear, and to put on the page what they hear in their heads--each of which requires its own set of mental and physical processes. Students will undergo exercises in melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation, sight-singing, interval and chord recognition, and so on.

CRN

90183

Course No.

MUS WKSH

Title

Workshop: Ear Training II

Professor

TBA

Schedule

Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm BLM 117

LAB: Fr 11:30 am - 12:50 pm BLM 117

Distribution

F

See description above.

CRN

90184

Course No.

MUS WKSH

Title

Workshop: Ear Training III

Professor

TBA

Schedule

Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am BLM 117

LAB: Fri 10:00 am - 11:20 BLM HALL

Distribution

F

See description above.

CRN

90180

Course No.

MUS WKSH A

Title

Workshop: Composition Seminar

Professor

Joan Tower

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm -3:50 pm BLM HALL

Distribution

F

This class will compose music that will be written down and passed to players to be rehearsed and taped. Every step of the process is assisted (particularly at the notational level) and discussed. Players in the class, as well as professional players from outside, will later join in to help bring each piece to life in sound. In addition, other twentieth-century works are played and discussed and occasional visits to performances of new music in New York are made. Individual meetings are arranged on a regular basis.

CRN

90181

Course No.

MUS WKSH B

Title

Workshop: Performance Class

Professor

Luis Garcia-Renart

Schedule

Th 1:30 pm -3:50 pm BLM HALL

Distribution

F

This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration. (Private lessons can be taken for credit by registering for this course.)

CRN

90185

Course No.

MUS WKSH F

Title

Workshop: Integrated Electronic Music & Art

Professor

Robert Bielecki

Schedule

Tu 1:30 pm -3:50 pm BLM EMS

Distribution

F

Cross-listed: Integrated Arts

A hands-on, multidisciplinary workshop combining diverse arts and media in interactive live performances and installations. The course offers instruction in the mastery of the facilities of the Blum Electronic Music Studios, including digital sampling, MIDI sequencing, and the programming of real-time, interactive, MIDI-based software, extensible to video and other visual domains (lighting, slides, and the like). It is hoped that a broad range of disciplines will be represented. Collaboration among students in Integrated Arts, Film and Electronic Media, Theater, Dance, Visual Arts, Music, and Writing is actively encouraged, as well as among computer-science students interested in real-time interactive systems, and physics students interested in constructing controls systems and interfaces. Enrollment is limited.

CRN

90186

Course No.

MUS WKSH G

Title

Workshop:Vocal and Voice Repertoire for Singers and Pianists

Professor

Arthur Burrows

Schedule

Mon 10:00 am - 12:00 pm BLM HALL

Distribution

F

In this singing class we explore the art songs of America, England, France and Germany, including some opera arias and ensembles depending on the make-up of the class. At the same time we learn the necessary technique to perform them successfully. Each class will be divided into two parts. The first will deal with vocal technique, and the second with technical issues that arise from individual performance. Requirements: the ability to match pitches, and an adequate vocal range. Pianists will be assigned individual singers to work with and coached in the various musical styles.

CRN

90187

Course No.

MUS WKSH H

Title

Workshop:Classic Guitar

Professor

Luis Garcia-Renart

Schedule

Wed 4:00 pm -6:00 pm BLM HALL

Distribution

F

Cross-listed: LAIS

Once a week a two-hour seminar will be offered to everyone to talk about specific technical and interpretation principals of the classical guitar, as well as to listen and to discuss the repertoire. This seminar is to be taken in conjunction with weekly private lessons offered by guitarist Greg Dinger. There will be a fee for the private instructor to be paid at the beginning of the semester. All levels of playing are accepted. Beginners to advanced players welcome.

SPECIAL PROJECTS

Special projects are designed for music majors only, to pursue individual or group projects with a particular professor.

CRN

90198

Course No.

MUS PROJ R

Title

SPECIAL PROJECT

Professor

Luis Garcia-Renart

Schedule

by arrangement

Distribution

F

CRN

90199

Course No.

MUS PROJ T

Title

SPECIAL PROJECT

Professor

David Behrman

Schedule

by arrangement

Distribution

F

CRN

90200

Course No.

MUS PROJ U

Title

SPECIAL PROJECT

Professor

Kyle Gann

Schedule

by arrangement

Distribution

F

CRN

90201

Course No.

MUS PROJ V

Title

SPECIAL PROJECT

Professor

Joan Tower

Schedule

by arrangement

Distribution

F

CRN

90202

Course No.

MUS PROJ Z

Title

SPECIAL PROJECT

Professor

TBA

Schedule

by arrangement

Distribution

F