A student who majors in the Literature Program begins by choosing a Literature I course from a range of such courses offered each semester.

To moderate in Literature a student must have taken at least six courses in the Division including any language and creative writing courses. At least one course must be in the English, United States, or comparative literature sequence. After Moderation, students choose seminars at the 300 level, and often tutorials in special topics as well. Students are encouraged to study a language other than English, and study-abroad programs are easily combined with a literature major.

Any course at the 100 level and many courses at the 200 level are open to first-year students.

CRN

90003

Course No.

LIT I A

Title

Literature I: Shakespeare

Professor

Robert Rockman

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 201

Distribution

B

Back to basics. Can we, through study, reflection and response, group discussion, locate what it is in Shakespeare's works that we are meant to enjoy, value, prize? At this date, is it possible to circumvent the reputation of the works and their author, along with centuries of publicity about them, to discover for ourselves, on our pulses, without ballyhoo and without diminishing him as an Elizabethan writer, why everyone (at least in the English-speaking world) seems to be in love with Shakespeare? Further, are there representative features, trademarks, qualities that identify something as singularly Shakespearean that we experience in reading Shakespeare solo or in seeing the plays performed? The aim of the course is to inquire into questions such as these and into others that we will surely propose along the way. For the course, then, a selection, TBA, of poetry and plays, as well as commentary of various periods and kinds.

CRN

90004

Course No.

LIT I B

Title

Literature I: Anna Karenina

Professor

Elizabeth Frank

Schedule

Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm ASP 302 Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am ASP 302

Distribution

B

Cross-listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies

Through a semester devoted to the "close reading" of the novel, students will be introduced to the study of fiction. Discussion will include the concepts of genre, convention, and style, "the rhetoric of fiction" and problems of narration. The topic of "realism" in Western literature will go hand in hand with specific questions about the novel's relationship to nineteenth-century Russian, French and English fiction and will address such questions as the conflict between morality and empathy, and differences between novels of psychological analysis and novels of social criticism.

CRN

90239

Course No.

LIT I C

Title

Milton's Paradise Lost

Professor

Mark Lambert

Schedule

Mon Wed 8:30 am -9:50 am OLIN 205

Distribution

B

After briefly addressing concerns in Milton's writing prior to his great Christian epic, the course will study Paradise Lost from a variety of perspectives: poetic, dramatic, philosophical and theological.

CRN

90062

Course No.

LIT I D

Title

Literature I: Four Poets, Donne &Herbert, Keats & Hopkins

Professor

Clark Rodewald

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm Prof. Rodewald's home - Annandale Rd.

Distribution

B

Close readings of a few works by two 17th century poets, sometimes thought of as "metaphysical", and two 19th century poets. The focus will be on the characteristic qualities of each.

CRN

90302

Course No.

LIT I E

Title

The Irish Renaissance

Professor

Terence Dewsnap

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm -4:20 pm OLIN 310

Distribution

B/C

Cross-listed: Irish and Celtic Studies

The Irish Renaissance of the first few decades of the twentieth century was the creation of those cultural leaders who founded the Abbey Theatre to nourish a specifically Irish (not British, not European) imagination. The revival exploited three sources: the mythical Ireland of Celtic legend where Cuchulain, Maeve, Finn, and Fergus waged epic battles over cows and birthrights with the aid and interference of magic; western Ireland, poetry and story; and a political history that is a persistent record of invasion, oppression, and faction, and of heroic gestures accompanied by a mood of tragic failure. The course begins with a brief history of Ireland, concentrating on three discrete moments: the end of the seventeenth century and the battles of Boyne and Aughrim, the abortive rising of 1798, and the 1890s spirit of nationalistic renewal. Then we consider the Abbey Theatre and its reconstruction of the legends of the past and the use of idioms and characters of the west of Ireland, chiefly in the drama of Yeats and Synge. We will look at the development of these themes in the literature associated with the troubles of 1916-22 and in later writings, which continue or challenge the themes of the Renaissance, including works by Sean O'Casey, Liam O'Flaherty, Frank O'Connor, Flann O'Brien, and Brendan Behan.

CRN

90325

Course No.

LIT I F

Title

Wright & Ellison

Professor

Donna Ford

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 308

Distribution

B

Cross-listed: MES, American Studies

Richard Wright's Native Son and Ralph Ellison's The Invisible Man are two of the most important works of American literature. Through close readings of these texts we will study the opposing aesthetic and political stances of these two writers.

CRN

90301

Course No.

LIT 123

Title

First Poetry Workshop

Professor

Robert Kelly

Schedule

Mon 3:00 pm - 5:20 pm OLIN 309

Distribution

B/F

This workshop is for new students who strongly desire to experiment with making their own writing a means of learning, both about literature and poetry, and about the discipline of making works of art. Stress is on growth: in the student's own work, and in the individual's awareness of what sorts of activities, rhythms, and tellings are possible in poetry, and how poets go about learning from their own work. The central work of the course is the student's own writing, along with the articulation, both private and shared, of response to it. Readings will be undertaken in contemporary and traditional poets, according to the needs of the group, toward the development of familiarity with poetic form, poetic movement, and poetic energy. Attendance at various evening poetry readings and lectures is required.

CRN

90706

Course No.

LIT 2010

Title

Principalities - Mantova

Professor

William Wilson

Schedule

By arrangement

Distribution

A/B

Cross-listed: Italian Studies

Related interest: Art History, Political Science

Places have been made available for students at all levels and all disciplines in this experimental seminar which studies the political and cultural life of an Italian Renaissance Principality. The seminar is also designed to develop skills in research, both in the library and on the World Wide Web. The subject to be investigated is the Italian city-state of Mantova when it was ruled (1328-1627) by the Gonzaga family, ruthless in politics and lavish in its patronage of arts, especially architecture, painting, the decorative arts, and music. Some names, Alberti, Mantegna, Pisanello. Giulio Romano, Guarini, and Monteverdi, have become central to European culture. There will also be the chance to consider other matters, for instance hydraulic engineering (the control of the River Muncio was essential to the protection of the city) and urban planning (the Gonzaga created a small "ideal" city, Sabbioneta, from scratch). Preliminary reading will include essential renaissance texts needed for an understanding of court life in a principality: Pico della Mirandola, On the Dignity of Man, Alberti, On Painting, Machiavelli, The Prince, and Castiglione, The Courtier. Beyond these, individual students will follow particular research interests in the library and on the Web to discover and evaluate documents and images pertinent to understanding and presenting the interrelation of elements in the culture of the city state, its arts, as well as its political and social structures, and the group will collaborate in building a web-page to display the results of the work of the seminar. The course will include special assistance and instruction in use of the resources of the library and of the World Wide Web. Expert knowledge of the computer is not necessary, though a general familiarity with word processing will be useful. Times for meetings will be arranged depending on those participating. Enrollment is limited. Admission is by permission of the instructor. Students who are interested should get in touch with Prof. Wilson as soon as possible: Aspinwall 103; x-7203; 758-4503, wilson@bard.edu, or campus mail. For a preliminary look at the web-page log in to: http://inside.bard.edu/academic/literature/mantova

CRN

90006

Course No.

LIT 204A

Title

Comparative Literature I: The Middle Ages

Professor

Karen Sullivan

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm -4:20 pm ASP 302

Distribution

B/D

This course aims to introduce students to the literature of the Middle Ages, with an emphasis upon the continental tradition. We will see how, after the dissolution of Charlemagne's empire, medieval society gradually reconstituted itself around the structures of feudalism and Christianity, finding its expression, first, in sagas and chansons de geste which praised bravery in battle and loyalty to one's kinsman or lord and, later, in lyrics and romances which celebrated the more refined virtues of chivalry and courtliness. We will examine how, during the years when the cathedrals and the universities were being constructed, scholasticism was seen as providing a new means through which knowledge could be organized and a new model for increasingly encyclopedic literary works. Finally, we will consider how the Black Death, the Great Schism, and the Hundred Years War affected the melancholic cast of late medieval culture. We will read the major authors of this time period, including the anonymous poet of The Song of Roland, the troubadours, Chrétien de Troyes, Dante Alighieri, and Geoffrey Chaucer, as well as Christine de Pizan, the first feminist of western letters, and François Villon, the poet-thief of the waning Middle Ages.

CRN

90170

Course No.

LIT 2102

Title

The Harlem Renaissance

Professor

Michelle Wilkinson

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 201

Distribution

B

Cross listed: American Studies, Gender Studies, MES

This course will examine the "re-birth" of African-American artistic expression that took place in the 1920s and 1930s. We will focus primarily on the literature - mainly poetry and prose fiction- as well as the nonfiction essays that often responded to and influenced the literature. We will examine literary works in their socio-cultural context and as they relate to the music and visual art of the period. A dual goal of the course is to chronicle the birth of a national consciousness that spawned the larger New Negro Movement and to note the specific role Harlem played in the artistic renaissance. Primary authors may include Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston and Sterling Brown. We will draw on the critical voices of David Levering Lewis, Gloria Hull and Houston Baker as we interrogate the meaning of race and gender during the period.

CRN

90044

Course No.

LIT 2106

Title

Lyric Modes

Professor

Benjamin LaFarge

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 309

Distribution

B/F

An introduction to some of the verse paradigms that make poetry in the English language one of the richest traditions in the world-the ballad, the sonnet, blank verse, nonsense verse, the ode, the song, the dramatic monologue, the villanelle, the sestina, the pantoum, etc. Students will learn how to read and write metrical verse by writing exercises in these forms, and by memorizing and reciting some classical poems as well. A particular concern will be the relation between meter and the speaking voice, but we will also consider different kinds of meter (accentual/syllabic, accentual, syllabic, and sprung rhythm). Still another concern will be the kinds of trope that distinguish classical (figurative) from modernist (elliptical) poetry.

CRN

90039

Course No.

LIT 2117

Title

Russian Laughter

Professor

Marina Kostalevsky

Schedule

Tu Th 1:20 pm -2:40 pm OLIN 308

Distribution

B/D

Cross-listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies

A study of humor in Russian literary tradition. Issues to be discussed relate to such concepts and genres as romantic irony, social and political satire, literary parody, carnival, and the absurd. We will examine how authors as distinct as Dostoevsky and Zoshchenko create comic effects and utilize laughter for various artistic purposes. As a result, our analysis of Russian literature will be substantially different from the traditional survey. Required readings (in translation) include the works of major Russian writers starting with the late-eighteenth-century satirical play by Denis Fonvisin and ending with Benedict Erofeev's underground cult masterpiece: a contemplation on the life of a perpetually drunk philosopher in the former Soviet Union.

CRN

90040

Course No.

LIT 2119

Title

Shakespeare and Mozart

Professor

William Wilson

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 101

Distribution

A/B

The study of three plays by Shakespeare, As You Like It, Measure for Measure, The Winter's Tale, and three operas by Mozart, The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, Cosi Fan Tutte, each concerned with love and marriage in changing societies.

CRN

90007

Course No.

LIT 2120

Title

The Production of Literary Uncertainty

Professor

Susan Bernofsky

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 303

Distribution

A/B

This course examines a selection of mostly 20th-century prose works that share a preoccupation with the breakdown of established orders of meaning, with the instability of personal identity and of the world as it is available to human perception. Our readings of these texts will explore questions of skepticism, undecidability and the limits of reason through an attention to rhetorical strategies, structural devices, narrative voice, language and point-of-view. Readings include Kleist, Kafka, Robert Walser, Wittgenstein, Raymond Queneau, Jorge Luis Borges, Kobo Abe, Ilse Aichinger, John Barth, Robert Coover and Donald Barthelme. Critical and creative projects.

CRN

90151

Course No.

LIT 2123

Title

Existentialism in French Literature

Professor

Justus Rosenberg

Schedule

Tu 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 107

Th by arrangement

Distribution

C/D

Cross-listed: French Studies

An examination of existentialism as a philosophical construct and the way it finds expression in significant essays, plays and novels by Sartre and Camus, its most prominent literary exponents. We explore the means by which these authors have conveyed in artistic terms their philosophical thoughts and political commitments and discuss the reasons for their gradually diverging differences, one gravitating toward a revolutionary position, the other toward a more moderate and spiritual one. Readings include Caligula, The Flies, No Exit, The Stranger, The Plague, Nausea, The Myth of Sisyphus, What is Literature, Existentialism is a Humanism! Students with an adequate reading knowledge of French are encouraged to read these works in the original and participate in a one-hour extra tutorial conducted in French.

CRN

90334

Course No.

LIT 2127

Title

African American Poetry

Professor

Michelle Wilkinson

Schedule

Mon Th 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 307

Distribution

B

In this course, we will examine the works of several important African American poets of the twentieth century, including Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks and Rita Dove. We will pay close attention to the range of expression and diversity in African American poetry, noting both conventional and innovative uses of poetic form, from the sonnet to the prose poem. In our discussion of "the new black poetry" and the contemporary performance or spoken word renaissance, we will consider the idea that African American poetry belongs to a continuum of African American oral and musical traditions. Readings of primary texts will be supplemented with recordings of poetry readings and author interviews. Through a series of creative assignments students will become more familiar with poetic styles and learn to write effectively about the genre.

CRN

90693

Course No.

LIT 2128

Title

American Fiction 1945-1975

Professor

Vivian Heller

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm LC 118

Distribution

B

After World War II, the American reading public witnessed an explosion of voices that cleared the stage for a dramatic variety of literary perspectives and preoccupations. In this course, we will study a broad range of major post-war figures, whose themes include ethnicity, race, gender, American self-making and American self-transcendance, failed relationships, reconstituted religions, hyper-self-consciousness, and the search for authentic experience. From the Southern patriarch to the urban intellectual junkie, from the post-war expatriot to the rediscoverer of American soil, from the modernist recaster of myths to the post-modernist forger of pastiches, we will explore four decades of American fiction, beginning with the late works of Willliam Faulkner, and moving on to the writings of Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, Bernard Malamud, Phillip Roth, Mary McCarthy, Grace Paley, Paul Bowles, William Burroughs, Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and Toni Morrison.

CRN

90042

Course No.

LIT 215

Title

Victorian Essays & Detectives

Professor

Terence Dewsnap

Schedule

Mon Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 310

Distribution

B/C

Cross-listed: Victorian Studies

Serial reading, in weekly installments, of two or three popular detective novels, such as Wilkie Collins's Moonstone and Arthur Conan Doyle's Study in Scarlet, will provide social background for essays by Mill, Macaulay, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, Arnold, Morris, and others that intend to illuminate and alleviate the problems of a rapidly developing industrial state.

CRN

90045

Course No.

LIT 221

Title

Writers Workshop:Prose Fiction

Professor

Robert Kelly

Schedule

Tues 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm OLIN 101

Distribution

B/F

Experiments in narrative. Students will present their work for group response, analysis and evaluation. Permission of the instructor is required; samples of writing must be submitted before registration.

CRN

90047

Course No.

LIT 229

Title

Modern Drama: Ibsen , Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht, O'Neill

Professor

Robert Rockman

Schedule

Mon Wed 8:30 am -9:50 am OLIN 201

Distribution

B

Through their original thinking about drama and theatre these playwrights helped define the directions, sensibility, styles, and themes of the twentieth century's playwriting and performance. The course studies representative plays and nondramatic writings by the six dramatists. The period covered is, approximately, 1880-1940. A few of the plays: The Wild Duck, Ibsen; Miss Julie, Strindberg; Three Sisters, Chekhov; Major Barbara, Shaw; Mother Courage, Brecht; Long Day's Journey Into Night, O'Neill. Supplementary reading. Papers, reports, exams.

CRN

90240

Course No.

LIT 2401

Title

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

Professor

Mark Lambert

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 307

Distribution

B

The unities and contrasts, pleasure, and meanings of this rich collection. Study of Chaucer's language and some background readings (e.g. Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy), but primarily an examination of a great poem. No previous knowledge of Middle English required.

CRN

90048

Course No.

LIT 248

Title

The Epic

Professor

Frederic Grab

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 304

Distribution

A/B

Cross listed: Classical Studies

The epic has been defined as "a formal composition which has drawn into itself the poetry of past ages through many levels of cultural experience: mythical, legendary, often historical, and also contemporary, with fictional details supplied by its final creator." The course will study the variety of cultural experience represented in the following works: Gilgamesh (Mesopotamia), Iliad (Greece), Ramayana (India), Sundiata and Gassire's Lute (Africa), The Tain (Ireland), The Elder Edda (Iceland), Song of Igor's Campaign (Russia), and others if time permits. Weekly papers.

CRN

90030

Course No.

LIT 252

Title

English Literature III

Professor

Deirdre d'Albertis

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 203

Distribution

B/C

Cross listed: Victorian Studies

An exploration of major writers, genres, and issues in the history of English literature from the medieval period through the mid twentieth century. Third of a three part series, Literature 252 concentrates primarily on poetry of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with some attention to the novel, criticism and drama; among writers studied are Austen, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Ruskin, Wilde, Eliot, Shaw, Lawrence, and Woolf.

CRN

90005

Course No.

LIT 259

Title

Literature of the United States III

Professor

Elizabeth Frank

Schedule

Wed 7:00 pm- 8:20 pm ASP 302 Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm ASP 302

Distribution

B/C

Cross-listed: American Studies, Victorian Studies

In this course we will study works written between 1865 and 1930--from the post-civil war period to the start of the Depression, emphasizing the new and evolving spirit of realism, naturalism, and emergent modernism. Authors include, but are not limited to Henry James, Mark Twain, Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, Robert Frost, Louise Bogan, Dawn Powell, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

CRN

90051

Course No.

LIT 3100 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

The Year 1000

Professor

Karen Sullivan

Schedule

Fr 1:30 pm -3:50 pm OLIN 310

Distribution

B/D

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies

On the eve of the year 1000, as on the eve of the year 2000, people were divided in their interpretations of the signs of the times. Some chroniclers perceived the earthquakes, famines, meteors, and heresies of these days as portent of the coming of Antichrist and the Last Judgment. Other chroniclers perceived these phenomena as nothing out of the ordinary. In this course, we will examine accounts of the events in Europe at the turn of the tenth and eleventh centuries, especially in Viking Scandinavia, Anglo-Saxon England, Capetian France, and Ottonian Germany, though we will also consider briefly developments in Ireland, Italy, Spain, and Byzantium as well. We will spend the last few weeks of the course considering millenarianism in the later Middle Ages, as seen in the reports of the Crusades in the Holy Land, the writings of the apocalyptic abbot Joachim of Fiore and his Franciscan followers, and the descriptions of the heretical flagellant movement. The course aims at once to acquaint students with the last days of the barbarian age, during which Christendom was establishing itself as the dominant order within Europe, and to compare the historical events which occurred during this time with the eschatological meanings which were attributed to them. Sagas, lyric poems, monastic chronicles, convent dramas, and papal epistles constitute some of the genres we will be investigating.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

CRN

90330

Course No.

LIT 311 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Anglo-American Modernist Fiction: Form, History and Gender

Professor

Deirdre d'Albertis

Schedule

Tu 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 310

Distribution

A/B

Cross-listed: Gender Studies

Commenting on the literature of her day, Gertrude Stein remarked "To the Twentieth Century, events are not important. You must know that. Events are not exciting. Events have lost their interest for people." In Stein's writing, and in the writing of her contemporaries, external events have surrendered to the imperious flow of inner life; the search for a way of capturing waywardness, urgency and irreducibility of subjective experience was producing radical experiments in narrative form. As Virginia Woolf wrote, "`The proper stuff of fiction' does not exist; everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss." This course sets out to examine Anglo-American modernist narrative as it was fashioned by writers who fractured realist conventions of narration and championed formal innovation in the representation of human consciousness. We will investigate the ways in which the modernist project both did and did not encompass an awareness of history, paying close attention to gender in particular and to revisions of what Wallace Stevens referred to as "the sexual myth." Works under consideration will include Ford's The Good Soldier, Conrad's The Heart of Darkness, Richardson's Pointed Roofs, Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Woolf's The Waves, selected short stories by Mansfield, Lawrence's Women in Love, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Barnes's Nightwood and Stein's Three Lives.

CRN

90052

Course No.

LIT 3121

Title

Irish Fiction

Professor

Benjamin LaFarge

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 309

Distribution

B

Cross-listed: Irish & Celtic Studies

Modern Irish fiction-the stories, novels, and plays of the past three hundred years-has been divided between two traditions: the Anglo-Irish tradition of writers who were English by descent but deeply identified with Ireland against England; and the Catholic tradition of modern Ireland. From the first we will read stories, polemics, plays, and novels by Jonathan Swift, Maria Edgeworth, Joseph Le Fanu, Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, J. M. Synge, Sean O'Casey, Elizabeth Bowen, and William Trevor; from the second, stories and novels by James Joyce, Frank O'Connor, Liam O'Flaherty, Flann O'Brien, and Roddy Doyle, among others.

CRN

90057

Course No.

LIT 3122

Title

Conflict and Memory: World War II and the German Occupation in French Literature, History and Film

Professor

Justus Rosenberg

Schedule

Mon Wed 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 308

Distribution

C/D

Cross-listed: French Studies, Jewish Studies

An examination of selected novels, social studies, documentary and feature films that deal with France's role during the Occupation. In analyzing these works, some of which are celebrating, others repressing, the memory of that period, we consider such issues as testimony, self-representation and historical commemoration. We also discuss whether filmmakers manifest more epistemological and representative certainty than novelists. Our first weekly session is devoted to a critical evaluation of the text read, the second one for viewing documentary and feature films and debating their artistic and social merits. Authors include J-P. Sartre, Robert Paxton, H. R. Kedward, P. Modiano, Claude Simon, Georges Perec, Marguerite Duras, Elie Wiesel, Henri Rousso, J. Semprun, Alain Finkelkraut, Pierre Vidal-Naquet. Films shown are by Jean Renoir, Claude Chabrol, Alain Resnais, Marcel Ophuls, Louis Malle, Claude Lanzman.

CRN

90053

Course No.

LIT 322 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Advanced Poetry Workshop: How To and What For

Professor

Ann Lauterbach

Schedule

Tu 3:30 pm - 5:50 pm OLIN 309

Distribution

B/F

Students present their own work to the group for analysis and response. Suggested readings in contemporary poets. Optional writing assignments are given for those poets who may find this useful. This course is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors but only by permission of the instructor. Samples of verse must be submitted before registration.

CRN

90332

Course No.

LIT 3221 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

The Poetics of Minimalism

Professor

Ann Lauterbach

Schedule

Wed. 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm LC 206

Distribution

B/F

Related interest: Art History, Music Composition

"I thought that if I could put it all down, that would be one way. And next came the thought to me that to leave all out would be another, and truer, way." A look at some artists/writers who have chosen "to leave all out." This decision suggests not only aesthetic concerns about abstraction, scale, gesture and figuration, but also about how art depicts and interprets the true and the real (world). Readings from Emily Dickinson, Stephan Mallarme, H. D., Samuel Beckett, Paul Celan, Robert Creeley, Barbara Guest, Susan Howe and Michael Palmer, among others. Course will also reference painters, sculptors, composers, and will include some critical readings. One in class presentation/paper; weekly response papers. Preference to upper level students, limit to 14.

CRN

90392

Course No.

LIT 3231 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

The Uses of Evidence

Professor

Luc Sante

Schedule

Fri 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm OLIN 205

Distribution

B/F

All literature is based upon evidence, if only the evidence of the senses, but the employment of factual data is the hallmark of a particular literature that straddles the line between non-fiction and fiction. This course will explore the many ways in which documents - case studies, newspaper clippings, eye-witness accounts, diaries, transcripts, court testimony, pamphlets, abstracts, technical manuals, advertising copy, and assorted ephemera - can be mined, plumbed, dissected, recast, reimagined, and transcended. It will also consider the use of non-written materials such as photographs, films, personal effects, architectural details, music, clothing, and sundry visual art materials as raw materials in an approach to writing that combines the methods of the historian, the detective, and the collagiste. The aim is to produce work that draws on many sources, and bears the imprint and texture of those sources, and yet retains a clear and distinctive voice and vision. Readings will include Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi, Andre Breton's Nadja, Joseph Mitchell's The Bottom of the Harbor, Michael Ondaatje's Coming Through Slaughter, as well as selections from William Carlos Williams's In the American Grain, Charles Reznikoff's Testimony, J. G. Ballard's The Atrocity Exhibition, Kathy Acker's The Childlike Life of the Black Tarantula, and work by Walter Benjamin, John dos Passos, Edmund Wilson, Joan Didion, and Don de Lillo, among others. There will be a number of writing assignments.

CRN

90054

Course No.

LIT 324 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Advanced Fiction Workshop

Professor

Bradford Morrow

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm OLIN 101

Distribution

F

A workshop on the composition of short stories, for experienced writers. Students will be expected to read extensively and to devote significant time, daily, to the composition and revision of their own stories. Some time outside of class, for guest readings, may also be required.

CRN

90055

Course No.

LIT 331 A (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Translation Workshop

Professor

William Weaver

Schedule

Mon 4:00 pm -6:20 pm OLIN 310

Distribution

B/D

Although some knowledge of a foreign language is necessary, this is not a language course, and no particular proficiency is required. An interest in language, especially English, is the most important thing. Students will be expected to work on some translation project (preferably prose); but their work will serve chiefly as a basis for the discussion of general problems of translation, its cultural significance, and the relationship between translation and creative writing. Class limited to 12 students.

CRN

90056

Course No.

LIT 331 B (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Translation Workshop

Professor

William Weaver

Schedule

Tu 4:00 pm -6:20 pm OLIN 308

Distribution

B/D

See description above.

CRN

90063

Course No.

LIT 348

Title

Mostly Victorian: Some 19th Century British Novels

Professor

Clark Rodewald

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm -5:50 pm Prof. Rodewald's home - Annandale Rd.

Distribution

B

Cross-listed: Victorian Studies

This course undertakes close readings of major novels by Austen (Pride and Prejudice), E. Brontë (Wuthering Heights), Dickens (Bleak House), Hardy (Tess of the d'Urbervilles), Eliot (Middlemarch) and Thackeray (Vanity Fair). (Warning to nonreaders: these are, for the most part, long novels.)

CRN

90058

Course No.

LIT 358 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Exile & Estrangement in Modern Fiction

Professor

Norman Manea

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm -3:50 pm OLIN 308

Distribution

B/D

Reading and discussion of selected fiction by such writers as Mann, Kafka, Nabokov, Camus, Singer, Kundera, Naipaul, etc. examining the work for its literary value and as a reflection of the issue of exile - estrangement as a fact of biography and a way of life. The complex topics of foreignness and identity, (ethnic, political, sexual) of rejection and loss, of estrangement and challenge, and also of protean mutability, are discussed in connection to relevant social-historical situations (war, expulsion, migration) and as major literary themes. Upper College Seminar. Preference given to students moderated in Language and Literature.

CRN

90059

Course No.

LIT 397 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Semiotics

Professor

Frederic Grab

Schedule

Wed 8:00 am - 10:20 am OLIN 303

Distribution

A/B

Early in the twentieth century, the Swiss linguist Ferdinand de Saussure conceived the science of semiotics as follows: "Language is a system of signs that express ideas, and is therefore comparable to writing, to the deaf-mute alphabet, to symbolic rites, to codes of good manners, to military signals, etc. It is simply the most important of these systems. A science that studies the life of signs in society is therefore conceivable: it would be a part of general psychology; we shall call it semiology (from the Greek semeion: sign). Semiology would teach us what signs are made of and what laws govern their behavior. Since this science does not yet exist, no one can say quite what it will be like, but it has a right to exist and it has a place staked out in advance." Since that time, the place of semiotics (Saussure's semiology) has assumed increasing importance in a wide variety of fields: literature, cinema, painting, music, and others. Culture in general has been studied as a system of signs; "any reality drawn into the sphere of culture begins to function as a sign," according to the Soviet theorist Jurij Lotman. In this course we will study a number of texts which attempt to define the history and the current status of "the tell-tale sign."

CRN

90060

Course No.

LIT 419 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Contemporary Masters: Philip Roth

Professor

Norman Manea/Philip Roth

Schedule

Tu 4:00 pm -6:20 pm OLIN 101 Wed 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 101

Distribution

B/C

Cross listed: Jewish Studies

The class will read and examine six of the major works by Philip Roth, and will meet afterwards with the author to discuss each book. (Two of the six class meetings with Mr. Roth will be open to the college.) The books to be read are: The Ghost Writer, The Counterlife, Sabbath's Theater, American Pastoral, I Married a Communist, Portnoy's Complaint. Philip Roth is one of American fiction's most distinctive postwar voices. Since his auspicious debut in 1959 with Goodbye, Columbus, he has been one of the country's leading writers. We will study each of the six books in depth in order to understand his originality as a novelist and a prose stylist. We will pay particular attention to his moral concerns, his narrative methods, and his unique blending of comedy, satire, and gravity. We will also examine the importance of his work to American and European historical events such as the Holocaust, World War Two, the Cold War and the Vietnam War-events that have occasioned some of the most traumatic transformations of twentieth-century American life. The class will meet every two weeks, Tuesday with Prof. Manea and Wednesday with Prof. Manea and Philip Roth.

CRN

90361

Course No.

LIT SEM

Title

Senior Writing Seminar

Schedule

Tu 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm OLIN 305

This non-credit student-run course is designed for the reading and discussion of senior projects in progress. Both poetry and fiction writers welcome (if this proves to be problematic, a separation is possible). Basic workshop format. Any questions can be directed to Courtney Scott at ces90@hotmail.com, or Box 651, Campus Mail. Please sign up with Robert Kelly. Prerequisite: Writing majors working on senior projects only.