INTEGRATED ARTS

Integrated Arts courses are designed to combine the study of two or more arts, either from a critical-historical point of view, or within creative workshops. Most of these courses are cross-listed from other programs.


CRN

90144

Course No.

IA 237/ARTH 237

Title

The History & Making of Old Master Prints from Dürer to Rembrandt

Professor

Edward Smith / Anne Bertrand

Schedule

Wed 9:00 am - 12:00 pm FISHER

Distribution

A/F

See description under Studio Art or Art History 237.


CRN

90324

Course No.

IA 319/ Film 319 Upper College Seminar

Title

Image & Sound: A Survey of Cinematic Strategies

Professor

John Pruitt

Schedule

Th 9:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE Screening: Wed. 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm PRE

Distribution

F

This seminar will make an in-depth study of a number of significant films which use the juxtaposition of image and sound/music in a particularly creative and challenging way -- ranging from the so-called silent era when films had live musical accompaniment, through the early, highly innovative days of the sound era (1927 - 1932), and up to the present. There will be traditional narrative films (e.g. Fritz Lang's M) as well as key works in the American avant-garde (e.g. Michael Snow's Rameau's Nephew). We will look at operatic form and its influence on cinematic dramaturgy (in Sergei Eisenstein and Luchino Visconti) and perhaps consider the work of major composers (e.g. Dimitri Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten) whose musical compositions were at some point in their careers closely associated with the cinema. We may also consider, in turn, the cinematic influence or resonance in the works of a small group of highly original American composers like Ives, Nancarrow, Partch, Reich, Ellington, et al. whose music either suggests the film medium through a "mechanized," sometimes periodic structure, or whose "narrative flow" or sound collage calls forth the structure of a filmic montage. Films studied in the course also include those by (among others): Dziga Vertov, Jacques Tati, Harry Smith, Peter Kubelka, Kenneth Anger, Luis Bunuel, Jean-Luc Godard, Humphrey Jennings, Marjorie Keller. The course is primarily designed for those students whose interests cross over between music and film; background in one or the other discipline is preferred but not required; upper college only. Required term paper and creative image/sound project.


CRN

90323

Course No.

IA 2122

Title

Exploding Text: Poetry in Performance

Professor

Bob Holman

Schedule

Th 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm OLIN 101

Distribution

F

The reemergence of the oral tradition has shocked the culture into a new appreciation for the power of the word. Poetry is giving voice to whole cultures who, for the first time, are being found in the literary canon. This course is a hands-on exploration of this full-bodied literature, providing a theoretical basis for this spoken word poetics via actual writing and performance practice. Among the traditions we study are jali, jibaro, slam, hiphop, Dada and Futurist, performance art, rock'n'roll, Beat, and the New York School. Alice Notley's The Descent of Alette, Fernando Pessoa, and Amiri Baraka will be some of our core texts this semester. We engage in the use of media other than the standard printed page and live performance for poetry creation/transmission: video, recording studios, live music collaborations, poets theater, and the Internet are all considered. As a final project, students are expected to create a performance in any of these media. Guest poets and performers will visit the class.

COURSES CROSS-LISTED IN INTEGRATED ARTS


CRN

90254

Course No.

ART 100 HT

Title

Foundations: Cybergraphics

Professor

Hap Tivey

Schedule

Tu 9:30 am - 12:30 pm FISHER

Distribution

F

This is a beginning course in the use of computers as graphics tools. Students are introduced to the use of Adobe Photoshop and the use of printing devices in relation to media and context.


CRN

90179

Course No.

MUS 307 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Music:High Culture, Low Culture, Popular Culture; an economic/aesthetic history of the musical uses of leisure time in 20th century America

Professor

Benjamin Boretz

Schedule

Th 10:30 am - 12:50 pm BLM 101

Distribution

C

It is a belief that what is known today as 'popular culture' is a singular phenomenon of 20th-century America, emerging as the output of growing and spreading affluence and the consequent need to fill leisure time. American 'popular culture' in this sense may have had its unique predecessor in the Troubadour culture of 12th-century Languedoc. This project tracks a series of economic/cultural groups as they create markets for various forms of musical diversion, each form serving to identify and articulate the self-image of each group. Apart from the 'high' culture's emblematic rituals of opera, symphony, and chamber music, whose progress through this period we follow in parallel with other developments, a primary focus is on musical forms drawing their sustenance in seemingly inexhaustible ways from the wellspring of African-American musical cultures, beginning with blues, ragtime, minstrelsy, musical theater, marches, and early "jazz" ( which later in its lifetime has spanned the gamut from the area between low and popular culture to the area between popular and high culture), dwelling considerably on the literature of sophisticated urban jazz-based popular-song music (1905-1950), and following the socio-economic-aesthetic configuration leading from rock 'n' roll to rock to disco, and beyond. The belated discovery in high-art culture of the experiential and musical possibilities available in real-time interactive situations (improvisation) and non-formal expressive situations in another far-reaching development originating in the example of African-American musical practices. Other tracks include the evolution of country music, urban blues, gospel, 'R&B', soul, (Motown), rap, 'avant-garde' jazz, and various appropriations and domestications of original black jazz forms by groups within the dominant culture. Still another track is the history of modern technology, which creates leisure time as well as new ways to use it; the evolution of popular culture is inseparable from that of media technology. In all cases, the relation of lifestyle (including fashions of dress and forms of congregation) to social imagery and musical forms (which also essentially include other expressive media such as dance) is regarded as intrinsic to this study.


CRN

90185

Course No.

MUS WKSH F

Title

Workshop: Integrated Electronic Music & Art

Professor

Robert Bielecki

Schedule

Tu 1:30 pm -3:50 pm BLM EMS

Distribution

F

A hands-on, multidisciplinary workshop combining diverse arts and media in interactive live performances and installations. The course offers instruction in the mastery of the facilities of the Blum Electronic Music Studios, including digital sampling, MIDI sequencing, and the programming of real-time, interactive, MIDI-based software, extensible to video and other visual domains (lighting, slides, and the like). It is hoped that a broad range of disciplines will be represented. Collaboration among students in Integrated Arts, Film and Electronic Media, Theater, Dance, Visual Arts, Music, and Writing is actively encouraged, as well as among computer-science students interested in real-time interactive systems, and physics students interested in constructing controls systems and interfaces. Enrollment is limited.


CRN

90347

Course No.

THTR 325

Title

Site Specific Theater

Professor

Jeff Sichel

Schedule

 

Distribution

F

4 credits, In this workshop students will focus on creating unique theatrical experiences inspired by sites on and around the Bard campus. Through a series of weekly assignments focusing on a reaction to the kinetics, space, sound, historicity, poetry and revelation of the uniqueness of particular sites, students will script, direct, choreograph, perform in and critique each others' works. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.