CRN

90015

Course No.

HIST 104

Title

American Bedrock

Professor

Myra Armstead

Schedule

Mon Wed 8:30 am -9:50 am OLIN 203

Distribution

C

Cross-listed: American Studies

Related Interest: MES

This is a foundational course in the history of the United States from the start of the colonial period, 1607, through the Gilded Age, roughly 1890. We will focus on the following themes: the emergence of a national idea and tensions within it, industrialization and the emergence of the middle class, the reform/perfectionist impulse in American life, the evolution of ethnicity and race as socio-economic categories, and developing American imperatives in foreign relations.

CRN

90016

Course No.

HIST 110

Title

The Early Middle Ages

Professor

Alice Stroup

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 205

Distribution

C

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies

Related Interest: French Studies

The European "middle ages" -originally so called as a term of derision-are more complex and heterogeneous than is commonly thought. This course surveys seven centuries, from the Germanic invasions and dissolution of the Roman Empire to the Viking invasions and dissolution of the Carolingian Empire. Topics include early Christianity, "barbarians," Byzantine Empire, Islam, monasticism, the myth and reality of Charlemagne. Readings include documents, Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, Einhard's Life of Charlemagne, and selections from Ammianus Marcellinus's The Later Roman Empire and Gregory of Tours's History of the Franks.

CRN

90377

Course No.

HIST 1121

Title

Europe in the Age of Total War

Professor

John Fout

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm - 5:50 pm OLIN 204

Distribution

C

This course examines World War I and World War II from a variety of perspectives. First, considerable emphasis will be placed on military history and the impact of the weapons of war which dramatically altered the nature of fighting in both wars. To do that there will be investigation into the new weapons developed between the American Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War and the outbreak of World War I and in the inter-war period. Military planning also altered the nature of wars and complicated the relationship between the military and civilian leaders, leading in some instances to military dictatorship. In addition, the correlation between modern industrial wars and the domestic economies will be studied carefully. The unique features of each war will be studied as well, including trench warfare in World War I and genocide in World War II--and the impact of the fighting on the homefront in both wars.

CRN

90017

Course No.

HIST 115 A

Title

African-American Experience I

Professor

Myra Armstead

Schedule

Tu Th 8:30 am -9:50 am OLIN 203

Distribution

C

Cross-listed: American Studies, MES, AADS

This course will survey the experience of black Americans in the United States from 1619, the arrival of the first shipload of Africans in British colonial America, to 1877--the end of the Reconstruction Era. Major issues to be explored include the slave trade, slavery--its rise as a labor system, its maintenance as a social system, its varied impact on slaves by gender and geographic location, its supporters, its varied opponents, and its political demise; free blacks, north and south; colonization, abolition, and other political strategies advocated by antebellum blacks; blacks in the Civil War; and the goals and limited achievements of Reconstruction.

CRN

90233

Course No.

HIST 121

Title

A Multicultural History of the United States

Professor

Gloria Chun

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 201

Distribution

A/C

Cross-listed: MES

Related Interest: Jewish Studies

An inter-disciplinary and comparative approach to the history and critical theories of "race" and multiculturalism in the United States. Particular focus will be placed on the Native American, the African American, and the Latina/o, Asian American, Jewish American, and Irish American experience. By way of comparison the U.S. context, we will also touch on race relations in South Africa and Europe. This is the "core" course in Multicultural and Ethnic Studies.

CRN

90108

Course No.

HIST 135

Title

"In the Realm of the Son of Heaven": Imperial Chinese History

Professor

Robert Culp

Schedule

Mon Wed 11:30 am -12:50 pm OLIN 201

Distribution

C

Cross listed: Asian Studies

China's imperial state, sustained in one form or another for over two millennia, was arguably history's longest continuous social and political order. This course will provide an introduction to the origins and transformations of the imperial order from the Warring States period to the final decades of the Qing Dynasty. Particular points of focus will be the founding and elaboration of the state bureaucracy, relations between the imperial state and elite social groups, and those elites' continuing reformulation of a flexible state ideology that incorporated various forms of Confucianism along with other diverse strains of thought. We will also explore fundamental social and cultural changes at key junctures of Chinese history, as well as how neighboring cultures and political systems in East Asia adopted and adapted to the ideology and institutions of Chinese imperial rule. A sweeping overview of pre-modern Chinese history, this course will provide a foundation for further study of East Asian history

CRN

90235

Course No.

HIST 144

Title

A Comparative History of the Asian Experience in America

Professor

Gloria Chun

Schedule

Mon Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 303.

Distribution

A/C

Cross-listed: MES

The approach of this course is comparative in two respects: first, it compares the historical experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Asian Indian, and Southeast Asian immigrants to the United States, examining immigration patterns, U.S.-Asian relations, location in the labor market, the role of women, political organization, and other aspects of their experiences; second, it compares various theoretical frameworks by which experiences of specific Asian American groups have been understood. The objective is not only to introduce Asian experiences, but also to foster critical thought about the interpretation and meaning of the unfolding history of Asians in the United States.

CRN

90111

Course No.

HIST 2112

Title

Political Culture in Early Modern Europe

Professor

Tabetha Ewing

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm - 5:50 pm OLIN 201

Distribution

C

Related Interest: French Studies, Italian Studies, German Studies

This survey covers Europe from 1559 to 1789 as a series of episodes and historical trends in which individuals and groups speak, write, and fight to make their claims to public power. How did they set about establishing institutional legitimacy? What was the repertory of words, documents, symbols, rituals, and acts used to maintain legitimate power? How was that legitimacy overthrown by a competing group? We will look at kings such as Louis XIV of France and Phillip II of Spain, queens Elizabeth I of England and Catherine II of Russia, and Emperor Charles V who convinced large populations to submit to their rule. Sometimes they failed when groups within those populations redefined what it meant to be a subject. The royal government made use of institutions such as the Court, Parliament, and City to augment its power; but, notoriously, these groups could turn on the ruler and provide the larger population with new languages of political defiance. The working poor in the countryside and towns made use of legal courts, local administrative bodies, and riots to bring their claims to the attention of the state. This is a good introduction for students interested in the history, art history, or literature of the period.

CRN

90112

Course No.

HIST 2113

Title

Race, Culture, and Identity in Modern East Asia

Professor

Robert Culp

Schedule

Mon. Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 305

Distribution

C

Cross Listed: Asian Studies, MES

Intersecting formulations of race and culture have been central to the construction of identity in modern East Asia. Focusing on China and Japan, this course will explore how intellectuals, states, and various social groups in both places deployed racialist discourses drawn from Social Darwinism, the totalizing narratives of linear history, and new cultural idioms of "invented tradition" to respond to the social, political, and ideological dislocation of the nineteenth century. We will approach the social and cultural politics of the region during the last two centuries by analyzing the competing identities generated by different groups' use of these discourses and strategies. A central aim of the course will be to sharpen our understanding of identity politics within our own nation by analyzing how formulations of race and culture have been used as tools for producing and challenging social power in societies that are modern yet very different from our own. Some prior exposure to Chinese or Japanese history will be helpful, but any student with a background and interest in issues of identity politics is welcome.

CRN

90147

Course No.

HIST 2121

Title

The Dutch Republic

Professor

Alice Stroup

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 201

Distribution

C

Related Interest: French Studies, History, Philosophy

Carved out of the Spanish Netherlands in the 16th century, the Dutch Republic survived for two centuries, until reconstituted by Napoleon as a monarchy. Focus on: the "Golden Age" of the 17th century, examined through the political theory of Grotius and Spinoza; maps of Mercator and Blaeu; paintings of Vermeer and Rembrandt; science of Huygens and Van Leeuwenhoek. Themes include: the heritage of Erasmian humanism; the theory versus the practice of tolerance; tensions between princely hegemony and republican institutions; rivalry with France and Britain; Dutch North America; the socio-cultural effects of empire; the Dutch Enlightenment.

CRN

90110

Course No.

HIST 2251

Title

The Roaring Twenties

Professor

Mark Lytle

Schedule

Tu Th 3:00 pm -4:20 pm OLIN 204

Distribution

C

This course questions the stereotype of the Jazz Age as a hedonistic escape from reality. Rather, the era involved a struggle between an emerging modernist and cosmopolitan urban culture and a more traditional small-town Victorian culture. The tension played out over such issues as prohibition, the "new woman," the Scopes Trial, the revived Ku Klux Klan, jazz, and the new consumerism. The media- radio, advertising, mass-circulation newspapers and magazines, and the movies-exposed Americans from all walks of life to a world that was new, exciting, often disturbing, and quickly changing. We will try to understand through the use of novels and historical sources what Americans experienced as they entered the modern era.

CRN

90018

Course No.

HIST 241

Title

Czarist Russia

Professor

Gennady Shkliarevsky

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 204

Distribution

C/D

Cross listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies

A semester-long survey will explore Russian history from Peter the Great to the 1917 revolution in a broad context of modernization and its impact on the country. Among the topics of special interest are: reforms of Peter the Great and their effects; the growth of Russian absolutism; the position of peasants and workers; the rift between the monarchy and educated society; the Russian revolutionary movement and Russian Marxism; the overthrow of the Russian autocracy. The readings will include contemporary studies on Russian history and works by nineteenth-century Russian writers.

CRN

90356

Course No.

HIST 258

Title

Jews in American Society

Professor

Joel Perlmann

Schedule

Wed 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm OLIN 309

Th 4:40 pm - 6:00 pm OLIN 309

Distribution

C

Cross listed: American Studies, Jewish Studies, MES

This course will cover the history and contemporary sociology of American Jewry, concentrating on the period since 1880, when the great waves of east-European Jews immigrated to this country (a major event in the modern history of the Jews as well as in American ethnic life). Jewish social and cultural pattern since that date will be examined with an eye to what is distinctive about the patterns of this group -- compared to the patterns of other American immigrant, ethnic and religious groups, and what is shared in common with these groups. The course will consider the internal development of American Jewish religious and ethnic culture as well as the evolving place of Jews in the wider economic, social, intellectual and political milieu of the United States. A special focus will be the social and cultural worlds of the immigrant generation, first in eastern Europe and then in the United States. The course will try to strike a balance between readings by historians and social scientists, and voices from the period and people being studied.

CRN

90019

Course No.

HIST 279

Title

The Other Europe: History of East Central Europe since WWII

Professor

Gennady Shkliarevsky

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 205

Distribution

C/D

Cross Listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies

PIE Core Course

The course will cover the history of East Central Europe from 1945 to the present. After a brief summary of the history of the region before and during World War II, the course will concentrate on the region's evolution since the war. In addition to surveying the period and examining the turning points in its evolution (for example, the Berlin uprising of 1953, the Hungarian revolution and reforms in Poland in 1956, the "Prague spring" of 1968, the Solidarity movement in Poland, and the revolutions at the end of the 1980s), we will explore a variety of specific topics, including political systems, economic organization, ethnic conflicts, and gender relations. Readings will include a textbook, specialized studies, original sources, and works of fiction.

CRN

90106

Course No.

HIST 280A

Title

American Environmental History: The Wilderness Era

Professor

Mark Lytle

Schedule

Wed Fr 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 202

Distribution

C

Cross listed: CRES, American Studies

Since the Old World first encountered the New, a struggle has taken place over what this new world might become. For some, it meant moral and spiritual rejuvenation. For most, it meant an opportunity to tap a natural warehouse of resources that could be turned into wealth. At no time have those two visions been compatible, despite the efforts of politicians, artists, and scientists to reconcile them. This course is about that struggle. It looks specifically at the United States from the colonial era until the early Twentieth Century-a period in which one of the world's most abundant wildernesses was largely transformed into an urbanized, industrial landscape. We will study the costs and consequences of that transformation while listening to the voices of those who proposed alternative visions.

CRN

90377

Course No.

HIST 298

Title

European Women since Mary Wollstonecraft

Professor

John Fout

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm LC 206

Distribution

C

Cross-listed: Gender Studies, Victorian Studies

This course is all about the experiences of European women from the late eighteenth century to the present. A host of issues will be emphasized, including: the life-styles of women of all classes; work, family, politics, including the feminist movements, sexual politics, and the emergence of women into what had been the exclusive arena of men. In other words, women's lives were transformed in a host of ways over the past two centuries and this course seek to understand why those transformations came about and what affect they had on the daily lives of women.

CRN

90148

Course No.

HIST 323 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Knowledge and Society during the Scientific Revolution

Professor

Alice Stroup

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm -3:50 pm OLIN 310

Distribution

C

Cross-listed: History and Philosophy of Science

Related Interest: Gender Studies, French Studies

The Scientific Revolution wrought a dramatic shift of thought about the universe. It also challenged traditional views about religion, society, and nature. We will examine the social impact of science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on concepts of nature and genders, the conflict between Galileo and the church, and the place of science in society. Upper-college seminar for moderated students in History or History and Philosophy of Science; students must be prepared to read an extensive and complex historiographical literature and to write a substantial research paper.

CRN

90107

Course No.

HIST 404 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

The Decision to Drop the Bomb

Professor

Mark Lytle

Schedule

Wed 1:30 pm -3:50 pm OLIN 303

Distribution

C

In 1994 a bitter dispute arose over plans to commemorate "Enola Gay," the plane that brought the world into the atomic age. Clearly, the decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki remains one of the most controversial in American history. The moral, diplomatic, and strategic issues involved in that decision remain hotly contested-all the more so since it ended one hot war and helped launch a cold one. Was the bomb dropped to end the war quickly and save American lives, as Harry Truman claimed? To frighten the Russians, as some revisionist historians have charged? Was white racism a factor? How did the atomic bombing compare morally to the Holocaust? What does the use of atomic weapons say about the nature of war and peace in the nuclear age? In a research paper in original sources, students will try to answer at least one such question by looking at the history of the Manhattan Project and coming to understand the attitude of politicians, scientists, and military leaders who participated in the decision. Students taking this class should consider also Prof. Fout's course on total war. Preference given to Sophomores and Juniors with a background in American History and Politics.