CRN

90075

Course No.

FREN 103

Title

Intermediate French

Professor

Odile Chilton

Schedule

Mon Tu Th 8:50 am -9:50 am LC 120

Distribution

D

A course designed for students who have completed Basic French or two years of high-school French. The emphasis will be placed on building vocabulary and reinforcing familiarity with grammar. Through the reading of short texts, students will be encouraged to express themselves with confidence and accuracy on a variety of topics both in speaking and in writing.

CRN

90076

Course No.

FREN 215

Title

French Translation

Professor

Odile Chilton

Schedule

Mon Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am LC 118

Distribution

D

Intended to help students fine-tune their command of French and develop a good sense for the most appropriate ways of communicating ideas and facts in French, this course emphasizes translation both as an exercise as well as a craft in its own right. The course will also address grammatical, lexical and stylistic issues. Translation will be practiced from English into French, and vice versa, with a variety of texts drawn from different genres (literary and journalistic). Toward the end of the semester, students will be encouraged to embark on independent projects.

CRN

90077

Course No.

FREN 270

Title

Advanced French Composition

Professor

Andre Aciman

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm LC 120

Distribution

B/D

Intended to help students fine-tune their command of spoken and written French, this course focuses on short works of fiction around which students are encouraged both to write short weekly papers and to discuss these with the rest of the class. The atmosphere is warm and intimate, and the reading is intended to provide students with the very best shorter works by nineteenth- and twentieth-century authors: Daudet, Constant, YourcenarSand, Stendhal, Flaubert, Proust, Gide, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet. Short reviews of grammar will also be conducted throughout the course.

CRN

90080

Course No.

FREN 316

Title

Proust: In Search of Lost Time

Professor

Andre Aciman

Schedule

Mon Wed 11:30 am - 12:50 pm LC 120

Distribution

B/D

Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time tells of an elaborate, internal journey, at the end of which the narrator joyfully discovers the unifying pattern of his life both as a writer and human being. Famed for its style and its distinctive view of love, art, and memory, Proust's epic remains a dominant and innovative voice in the literature of self-exploration. This seminar, which is designed for all students as well as creative writers who wish to understand the complex nature of the modern novel, will examine how Proust's epic has challenged and redefined not just the art of writing, but the art of reading as well. The course will be taught in translation but students able to read the original French are encouraged to do so.

CRN

90500

Course No.

FREN 318

Title

Introduction to African Literature in French

Professor

Emmanuel Dongala

Schedule

Wed. 3:00 pm - 5:20 pm OLIN 304

Distribution

B/D

This seminar is designed for students who wish to discover African literature written in French through the reading of the original French texts. The course will examine the formal structures of the texts and wherever appropriate will discuss the political, social and historical context of their production. The reading will cover a wide range of writers, from the negritude movement to present day writers, including the emerging women writers. Although some short stories and short extracts of some texts will be read, students are expected to read three full length novels per semester. The course is conducted in French.

CRN

90078

Course No.

FREN 319

Title

Essays, Meditations, Reveries: Artlessness and Authenticity in French Literature

Professor

Marina van Zuylen

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 107

Distribution

B/D

It has been said that Montaigne's Essais revolutionized our ways of thinking about the self. Since his loosely connected, allegedly logic-free Essais, French writers have likened authenticity to a lack of formal structure. Descartes introduced the meditation, Rousseau favored the rêverie, Stendhal launched the loosely composed, factually-suspect autobiography, and Bergson questioned the very possibility of a unified self that could replay itself through writing. Sweeping away classical notions of composition and unity, these writers hid their artfulness behind the formless and the unpremeditated. This not only inaugurated an intensely individual and unstable relationship to the notion of truth, but implicated the reader in this destabilizing process. This class will explore how the Augustinian notion of authenticity led to a radical reevaluation of style, mimesis, and self-presentation in French literature. Readings by Montaigne, Descartes, Madame de Sévigné, Rousseau, Stendhal, Duras, and Sarraute. Taught in French. All readings in French.