Note to first-year students: the Film Department tries to accommodate as many seriously interested students as possible, whether they are prospective film majors or not. We do this by offering Film 109 solely for first-year students. Film 109 serves as a prerequisite for those who are thinking of making film a focus of their studies

CRN

90219

Course No.

FILM 109

Title

An Introduction to the History and Aesthetics of Film

Professor

John Pruitt

Schedule

Tu 9:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE

Screening: Sun. 7:00 pm-10:00 pm PRE

Screening: Mon. 7:00 pm-10:00 pm PRE

Distribution

A

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Films by Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, and Arnheim.

CRN

90321

Course No.

FILM 201 A

Title

Introduction to Film Making I

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

Schedule

Wed. 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to the film medium, through classroom production of

short films and out-of-class assignments. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project.

Prerequisite: a 100- or 200- level course in film history.

CRN

90322

Course No.

FILM 201 B

Title

Introduction to Film Making I

Professor

Ken Kobland

Schedule

Th. 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

See description above.

CRN

90230

Course No.

FILM 201 C

Title

Introduction to Video Production I

Professor

Les LeVeque

Schedule

Thur. 9:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

This workshop will emphasize the techniques and strategies related to small-format video production. Class sessions will include screenings of film, digital, and video work, with a focus on the history of video as an art form. There will be weekly production exercises, and all students will produce a substantial final project. By permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: A 100 or 200 level course in Film History

CRN

90227

Course No.

FILM 204

Title

Documentary History

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

Schedule

Wed 10:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE

Screening: Tu 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm PRE

Distribution

F

The course provides a historical overview and critique of the documentary form, with examples from ethnographic film, social documentary, cinema verité, propaganda films, and travelogues. The class investigates the basic documentary issue of truth and/or objectivity and critiques films using readings from feminist theory, cultural anthropology, general film history/theory, and other areas.

CRN

90228

Course No.

FILM 214

Title

Topics in the History of Cinema

Professor

Adolfas Mekas

Schedule

Tu 1:30 pm -4:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

Designed to give the student in-depth understanding of a particular period, style or national school of film making. Weekly screenings of films and related seminars comprise the bulk of the course. There are no prerequisites. This semester the topic is: HOLLYWOOD BEDLAM The rise and fall of American screwball comedy - from the hilarious heights of early 30's and 40's to rare attempts of today. Major works by master directors: Howard Hawks, Preston Sturges, Leo McCarey, Ernst Lubitsch, and others will be screened. Required reading and mid/final projects. Supplementary viewing will be assigned.

CRN

90221

Course No.

FILM 300

Title

Non-Linear Editing

Professor

Les LeVeque

Schedule

Fri. 9:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

A class designed to introduce juniors and seniors concentrating in film and video to current nonlinear editing systems. This class will combine traditional postproduction editing strategies and theory with computer-based nonlinear techniques. Students are required to create short videos based on film or video material.

CRN

90365

Course No.

FILM 302

Title

Media and Landscape

Professor

Peter Hutton

Schedule

F 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

A class designed for Junior level film and video majors. The class will study and compare representations of the American landscape through the history of film and painting vs. the depiction of landscape and environmental issues manifest through television and video. Students will be required to complete a short film or video referencing these issues. Required reading: B. McKibbon's The Age of Missing Information.

CRN

90223

Course No.

FILM 312

Title

Advanced Scriptwriting Workshop

Professor

Adolfas Mekas

Schedule

Wed 1:30 pm -4:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

An intensive workshop for committed writers/cineasts. From an idea to plot, from an outline to full script - character development and dramatic/cinematic structure. Continuous analysis of students' work in a seminar setting. Students who wish to participate in this workshop should have a demonstrable background in film or in writing, and be able to share their work with others. Limited enrollment for upper college students only, or by permission of the professor. Submission of work and/or an interview prior to registration is recommended.

CRN

90324

Course No.

FILM 319 (Upper College Seminar)

Title

Image and Sound: A Survey of Cinematic Strategies

Professor

John Pruitt

Schedule

Th 9:30 am - 12:30 pm PRE

Screening: Wed 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm PRE

Distribution

A/C

This seminar will make an in-depth study of a number of significant films which use the juxtaposition of image and sound/music in a particularly creative and challenging way -- ranging from the so-called silent era when films had live musical accompaniment, through the early, highly innovative days of the sound era (1927 - 1932), and up to the present. There will be traditional narrative films (e.g. Fritz Lang's M) as well as key works in the American avant-garde (e.g. Michael Snow's Rameau's Nephew). We will look at operatic form and its influence on cinematic dramaturgy (in Sergei Eisenstein and Luchino Visconti) and perhaps consider the work of major composers (e.g. Dimitri Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten) whose musical compositions were at some point in their careers closely associated with the cinema. We may also consider, in turn, the cinematic influence or resonance in the works of a small group of highly original American composers like Ives, Nancarrow, Partch, Reich, Ellington, et al. whose music either suggests the film medium through a "mechanized," sometimes periodic structure, or whose "narrative flow" or sound collage calls forth the structure of a filmic montage. Films studied in the course also include those by (among others): Dziga Vertov, Jacques Tati, Harry Smith, Peter Kubelka, Kenneth Anger, Luis Bunuel, Jean-Luc Godard, Humphrey Jennings, Marjorie Keller. The course is primarily designed for those students whose interests cross over between music and film; background in one or the other discipline is preferred but not required; upper college only. Required term paper and creative image/sound project.

CRN

90222

Course No.

FILM 325

Title

Advanced Cinema Project

Professor

Adolfas Mekas

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm -4:30 pm PRE

Distribution

F

This course fulfills Major Conference requirement for Film majors. The students will meet as a group and in a weekly tutorial. The student will complete a project of one's choice: film, video, script, research paper, etc. Open to non-majors by prior arrangement.

CRN

90396

Course No.

FILM 330

Title

Film Criticism: Writers Workshop

Professor

Lisa Katzman

Schedule

Tues. 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm PRE 101

Distribution

F

A seminar focusing mainly on the weekly writing of film critiques. Students will take into consideration no particular kind of school of film making, but will examine the medium, through the practice of writing in the wide variety of its modes of expression. This would inevitably include films shown at Bard during the semester, as well as contemporary works being screened in the area as well. In addition, we will read and discuss exemplary pieces of published film criticism and theory in order to strengthen our understanding of already established critical issues and the essential characteristics of good, forceful writing. Only students interested in sharing their work with others should take this course. Limited enrollment. Preference will be given to those students who have already taken a course within the department. Open to non-majors.