Courses listed as classics (CLAS) are entirely in English and require no knowledge of an ancient language. Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit courses all involve the study of the language itself.

CRN

90071

Course No.

CLAS 209

Title

Early Greek Philosophy

Professor

William Mullen

Schedule

Mon Wed 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 303

Distribution

A/D

Cross-listed: Philosophy

Consideration of the principal pre-Socratic philosophers - Parmenides, Heracleitus, Empedocles, Democritus and others - with respect to developments in Greek religion and science as well as to the history of philosophy.

CRN

90070

Course No.

CLAS 214

Title

Catastrophe / Apocalypse

Professor

William Mullen

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 205

Distribution

B/D

Cross listed: Religion, Literature

It would be hard to find a culture that has no cosmic catastrophes in its sacred narratives: deluge myths, combats in the sky, universal conflagrations. Usually these catastrophes are in the past, whether at the beginning of the world or in human memory. Sometimes they are also foretold for the future, and are then viewed apocalyptically, as ultimate revelations of a divine plan. Why do so many cultures have these stories, and why are they central to their sacred texts? We will examine a range of explanations and see how each affects our evaluation of the works read, as documents of human experience, as canonical texts, and as literature. Readings will include the Greek Theogony, the Mesopotamian Enuma Elish, selections from the Bible, the Norse Eddas, and the Mayan Popol Vuh. Interested First-Year students should speak to Prof. Mullen on Mon. Aug 30th, 2pm - 4pm, or Tues. Aug. 31st, 9am-12pm in ASP 307.

CRN

90366

Course No.

CLAS 243

Title

Greek Tragedy

Professor

Zara Martirosova

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 pm -2:50 pm OLIN 305

Distribution

B

Cross listed: Theater

The course will introduce the students to the origins, development and staging of Greek tragedy. The tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides will be read and discussed both from the literary and performance aspect. The readings will include The Oresteia, Prometheus Bound, The Persians, The Trojan Women, The Women of Trachis, Oedipus Rex, Antigone, Ajax, Medea, The Bacchae, Electra, Helen, and Hippolytus. All readings will be in translation.

GREEK

CRN

90072

Course No.

GRE 101

Title

Elementary Greek I

Professor

Zara Martirosova

Schedule

Mon Tu Th 10:20 am - 11:20 am LC 120

Distribution

D

Ancient Greek is the language of the epics of Homer, the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, the comedies of Aristophanes, the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, etc. In this course, students will learn the grammar of Greek and acquire a fundamental vocabulary. Attention will also be given to pronunciation and recitation of poetry and prose. Discussions of Greek culture and thought will occasionally result. In the second semester, significant passages from ancient authors will be read.

CRN

90598

Course No.

GRE 201

Title

Intermediate Greek

Professor

Zara Martirosova

Schedule

Mon 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 302

Thur 8:30 am - 9:50 am OLIN 302

Distribution

D

LATIN

CRN

90234

Course No.

LAT 101

Title

Foundational Latin Experience

Professor

Christopher Callanan

Schedule

Mon 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 203

Tu Th 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm OLIN 308

Distribution

D

Latin is the language not only of Vergil, Cicero, Horace, Catullus and Tacitus, but of poets, historians, philosophers and theologians from the time of St. Augustine through the Middle Ages on into the Renaissance. It is the language in which western culture was transmitted to Europe or first invented. In this course, students with no (or relatively little) previous experience of Latin will acquire a working knowledge of the language. As far as possible, Latin will be learned as a language spoken and heard in the classroom, not as abstract rules and paradigms. We will speak, chant, sing and perform skits in Latin, in addition of course to reading. By the end of Latin 102, the spring continuation of this course, students will be able to hold their own in conversation and also, with the aid of a dictionary, read most Latin authors. This course forms an indivisible sequence with Latin 102 in the spring.

CRN

90074

Course No.

LAT 201

Title

Intermediate Latin

Professor

William Mullen

Schedule

Mon Wed 3:00 pm -4:20 pm OLIN 306

Distribution

D

An introduction to the literature and culture of the Roman Republic. Readings will include both poetry and prose and will also provide an introduction to colloquial Latin and the opportunity to practice it in class. The course is open to students with one year of college Latin or the equivalent. Students with High School Latin are certainly welcome and should see the instructor about placement.

CRN

90355

Course No.

LAT T250

Title

Tutorial: Roman Comedy

Professor

Christopher Callanan

Schedule

by arrangement

Distribution

D

This tutorial is open to all students interested in taking part in the stage performance of a Roman Comedy in Latin. Participants must have some knowledge of Latin, but no acting experience is necessary or expected. We will be rehearsing either the Amphitruo or the Rudens of Plautus, depending on the participants. As the performances will not take place until the spring, this semester should not prove arduous, but it does involve a commitment to continuing in the spring. There are also smaller roles for projectors and the like. Credit can be given for the tutorial on an individual basis. One or more flute players will also be required for the play: the ability to improvise (or even compose) is important, but no Latin is required, and no academic credit will be possible.

SANSKRIT

CRN

90125

Course No.

REL 225

Title

Intermediate Readings-Sanskrit

Professor

Richard Davis

Schedule

Mon Wed 3:00 pm -4:20 pm OLIN 204

Distribution

D

Cross-listed: Religion

The course combines intermediate-level readings in Sanskrit with the study of Indian society and religion. Beginning with a review of basic grammatical structures of Sanskrit, students will quickly move on to read Sanskrit texts such as the animal fables of the Hitopadesa, the religious philosophy of the Bhagavad Gita, and the classic poetic rendition of the Buddha's life, the Buddhacarita of Asvaghosa. Prerequisite: Sanskrit 101-102 or equivalent.