19483

WRIT 121 A

 Fiction Workshop I

Mary Caponegro

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 107

PA

PART

This introductory-level course is for students interested in writing fiction as a means of both critical and creative engagement. Over the course of the semester we will read works that reflect a range of aesthetic approaches in order to broaden our exposure to literature and enrich our palettes as emerging practitioners. Readings will include stories from authors such as Angela Carter, John Cheever, and Italo Calvino, as well as narratives from contemporary and classical authors in translation. Through our own creative work, and the close, critical reading of our stories, we will try to become better artisans of language and narrative. No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

19484

WRIT 122

 Nonfiction Workshop I

Susan Rogers

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 101

PA

PART

This course presents the breadth of formal possibilities available to writers of short nonfiction. Students workshop—i.e., read and comment on​—published pieces by Montaigne, Baudelaire, Poe, Twain, ​Nellie Bly, ​George Orwell, Joan Didion, ​James Baldwin, Guy Davenport, Leonard Michaels,​ ​Susan Sontag, Ben Metcalf,​ Leslie Jameson,​ David Foster Wallace,​ Claudia Rankine, Maggie Nelson, Ben Lerner, Moira Donegan, Ta-Nehesi Coates,​ John Jeremiah Sullivan​, Thomas Chatterton Williams, ​Adrian Nicole LeBlanc ​and ​Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah​. Workshopping these established writers enables students to learn both what a piece of nonfiction writing is as well as how to workshop ​a piece of writing. In addition to short writing exercises throughout the term, the course will ​ask that students attempt​ two​ ​substantial pieces of nonfiction writing of their own, guided by formal lessons learned through reading the best in the form. No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

19485

WRIT 123

 Poetry Workshop I

Michael Ives

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 305

PA

PART

Open to students who have never had a workshop in poetry and who desire to experiment with making their own writing a means of learning both about literature and poetry and about the discipline of making works of art. Attention is mainly on the student’s own production, the individual’s awareness of what sorts of activities, rhythms, and tellings are possible in poetry, and how poets go about learning from their own work. The central work of the course is the student’s own writing, along with the articulation, private and shared, of response to it. Readings are undertaken in contemporary and traditional poets, according to the needs of the group, toward the development of familiarity with poetic form, poetic movement, and poetic energy. Attendance at various evening poetry readings and lectures is required. No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

19553

WRIT 221

fiction Workshop II

Benjamin Hale

  Tu  Th        11:50 am – 1:10 pm

 OLIN 308

PA

PART

This workshop is open to any thoughtful mode of making fiction, whether traditional or experimental or in between. Students will be expected to produce and revise three or four carefully developed stories and to provide written critiques of their peers’ work, as well as to read and respond to published fiction.

Class size: 12

 

19487

WRIT 230

 Materials and Techniques of Poetry

Michael Ives

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 301

PA

PART

It is the unique capacity of poetry to capture the movement of mind and body in a resonant verbal architecture. In this course, students examine, from the ground up, the elements of that architecture by asking what, in the most concrete terms, makes a poem a dynamic, saturated language event. Rather than thinking of structure as an imposition, this workshop considers it an aid to the freeing of the imagination. Along the way, students encounter such aspects of poetic form as patterns of repetition; the infinite varieties of syntax, punctuation, meter, and typography; the “color” of vowels; and the rhythmic implications of word choice and sentence structure. Participants explore a range of techniques and materials from around the world and from the beginning of recorded history right up to the present moment. Writing for the course takes the form of creative responses to a wide variety of reading and weekly “experiments.” Students must email a writing sample of approximately seven pages to ives@bard.edu in advance of registration.

Class size: 12

 

19488

WRIT 231

 Reading & Writing the Birds

Susan Rogers

 T           9:30-10:50 am

  Th        7:30-10:50 am

OLIN 305

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies Students will become familiar with approximately a hundred local birds by ear and by sight, then write about the birds using both experience and research. To guide our writing we will read narratives of bird discovery and adventure from Alexander Wilson and John James Audubon to Olive Thorne Miller, Florence Merriam Bailey, Roger Tory Peterson, and Kenn Kaufman. Tuesdays will involve in-class discussion of readings and small group workshops, and Thursdays will often be held in the field (we will not always meet at 7:30 but you must be ready and willing to attend class at that hour). A good pair of binoculars is suggested.  Class size: 12

 

19486

WRIT 239

 a special way of being alive: How and Why to Write Literary Criticism

Wyatt Mason

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 306

PA

PART

How does one write -- on deadline -- about new works of literary enterprise for an intelligent reading audience outside the academy? How does one, when given 5000 words of real estate in the New Yorker, or Harper's, or The New York Review of Books, write an essay that will engage a new work -- a collection of poetry or stories; a novel; a biography of a writer of any of these forms -- and offer an opinion of the work's merits that is as fair to the ambitions of the author in question as it is to the larger endeavor of literary enterprise? How, in short, do you say what you think while the clock ticks? How do you do that in a literary culture with diminishing space given over to this essential humanistic endeavor: the public conversation about books? And who should have the privilege of writing about such things? In this workshop, we will read examples of literary criticism from throughout its history, including writing by Samuel Johnson, William Hazlitt, Virginia Wolff, Edmund Wilson, Mary McCarthy, John Updike, Denis Donoghue, Susan Sontag, David Foster Wallace, Thomas Chatterton Williams, John Jeremiah Sullivan, Roxane Gay, Rivka Galchen, and James Wood. Through this exposure to the varieties of argumentative experience, we will learn how such pieces are structured and how arguments -- aesthetic ones -- are mounted and defended, to the end of writing a final, 5000-word piece of long-form literary criticism of our own. Contact professor by email in advance of registration with a note about why you want to be in the class.  Class size: 12

 

19489

WRIT 315

 The Adventure

Joseph O'Neill

M           11:50-2:10 pm

HEG 200

PA

PART

Is the adventure an archaic form— of writing and of seeing? What space--psychological, political, cultural, geographic--remains for the adventure in hyper-modern times? In this course we'll be reading texts that embrace or refuse the idea of the thrilling yarn, and we'll be writing fiction that investigates this territory. Authors may include Borges, Portis, Cusk, Melville, Stevenson, Sarrazin, Wright, Bunyan. Class size: 12

 

19490

WRIT 321

 American Revolutionary Poetics: poetries and movements that changed the world

Dawn Lundy Martin

 T           4:40-7:00 pm

OLIN 301

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  A studio course in which the craft of writing poems is at the center of our practice. Moving from the late 18th-century black poetry that claimed Negro subjectivity to the Harlem Renaissance to the Beat Poets and beyond, at the core of our creative practice will be the question: Can poetry, in its different way of knowing, transform matter and change belief systems and the world? Authors include Phillis Wheatley, Fredrick Douglass, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Lucille Clifton, Allen Ginsberg, Anne Waldman, Claudia Rankine, Myung Mi Kim, and others.  Class size: 12

 

19493

WRIT 324

 Fiction Workshop III

Benjamin Hale

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 306

PA

PART

This is a workshop in prose fiction for advanced students. Students are expected to submit at least two works of fiction to the workshop and critique their peers’ writings. This course is restricted to students who have taken at least one previous Written Arts workshop (in any genre: fiction, poetry, or nonfiction). No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

19495

WRIT 334

 Writing the Roots

Robert Kelly

  W         4:00-5:20 pm

SHAFER  301

(Prof. Kelly’s office)

PA

PART

2 credits   What can a word tell us about its thing?  The poet Charles Olson used to talk about ‘running a word,’ tracing it back to its sources.  Etymology reveals social and physical conditions in history which in turn condition what words mean to us, how we think with them, how we use them. A small conference group will investigate by writing from and through what the words can teach us.  This is a writing workshop in terms of the work to be done.

Class size: 7

 

19494

WRIT 336

 Prose Studio

Luc Sante

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 302

PA

PART

Just as the visual arts employ studios to stretch muscles, refine technique, and launch ideas, so this class functions for writers of fiction and nonfiction. Every week there are paired reading and writing exercises concerning, e.g., voice, stance, texture, rhythm, recall, palette, focus, compression, word choice, rhetoric, and timing. For serious writers only. This course is restricted to students who have taken at least one previous Written Arts course (in any genre: fiction, poetry, or nonfiction). No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 12

 

19491

WRIT 343

 On Description: Writing the World

Ann Lauterbach

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

HEG 300

PA

PART

What do we mean by description or representation today, when so much of our daily lives are spent in relation to a dematerialized digital world? The embodied world engages all of our senses, not only the visual. In this course, we will read passages from disparate sources, historical and contemporary, poems, prose essays and fiction, in which writers vividly convey persons, places and things. How did Proust describe a landscape or a painting? How does Nathaniel Mackey capture the sound of jazz? We will listen to music, look at pictures, walk through our surroundings, and write descriptions of what we experience, noticing the ways our moods and memories affect what we perceive and how we write. If we cannot attend to the particulars of the world in which we live, how can we hope to distinguish between real and fake, true and false? Students must email a letter to the professor in advance of registration.  Class size: 12

 

19492

WRIT 345

 Imagining Nonhuman Consciousness

Benjamin Hale

M           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 308

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights  P hilosopher Thomas Nagel asked, “What is it like to be a bat?” Ultimately, he determined the question unanswerable: A bat’s experience of the world is so alien to our own that it is beyond the human  understanding of subjective experience.  That’s arguable.  But it is true at least that a bat’s experience—or that of any other nonhuman consciousness—is not inaccessible to human imagination.  In this course we will read and discuss a wide variety of texts, approaching the subject of nonhuman consciousness through literature, philosophy, and science.  We will read works that attempt to understand the experiences of apes, panthers, rats, ticks, elephants, octopuses, lobsters, cows, bats, monsters, puppets, computers, and eventually, zombies. Course reading may include Descartes, Kafka, Rilke, Jakob von Uexküll, Patricia Highsmith, John Gardner’s Grendel, J.A. Baker’s The Peregrine, Eduardo Kohn’s How Forests Think, David Foster Wallace, Temple Grandin, Frans de Waal, Jane Goodall, Thomas Nagel, John Searle, Susan Datich, E. O. Wilson, Giorgio Agamben, and Bennett Sims’s A Questionable Shape, among others, in addition to a viewing of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later, and possibly other films. This is also a craft class, as each student will produce a substantial project over the semester.  The assignments will be open-ended, open to both creative and analytical works; a major component of the class will be incorporating these ideas into our own writing. This course is part of the Thinking Animals Initiative, an interdivisional collaboration among students and faculty to further the understanding of animals and human-animal relationships. Students interested in this workshop must email bhale@bard.edu by December 9th for instructions.  Class size: 12

 

19496

WRIT 405

 Senior Colloquium:Written Arts

Dinaw Mengestu

M           4:40-6:00 pm

OLINLC 115

 

 

The Senior Colloquium in the Written Arts is an important supplement to the Senior Project. It has several objectives: intellectual/artistic, social, and vocational. The primary purpose is to guide seniors, both practically and philosophically, in the daunting task of creating a coherent and inspired creative work of high quality within a single academic year. Emphasis is on demystifying the project process, including its bureaucratic hurdles, as well as exploring the role of research in the creative realm, and helping students use each other as a critical and inspirational resource during this protracted solitary endeavor, sharing works in progress when appropriate. This supplements but never supplants the primary and sacrosanct role of the project adviser. Program faculty and alumni/ae, career development and other staff, and outside speakers (such as editors, translators, MFA graduates and directors, publishing personnel, etc.) contribute their collective wisdom and experience, sharing the myriad ways in which writers move an idea toward full creative realization, and giving a glimpse of the kinds of internships and careers available to the writer. Required for students enrolled in a Written Arts Senior Project. All such students are enrolled automatically by the Registrar.  Class size: 30

 

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

19393

FILM 312

 Advanced Screenwriting

Aymara Moreno

   Th       10:10-1:10 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts

 

19201

LIT 380

 Poetry and Attentiveness

Philip Pardi

    F        10:00-5:00 pm

OLINLC 115

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities; Written Arts