18325

WRIT 121

 Fiction Workshop I

Benjamin Hale

M  W   11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 308

PA

PART

This introductory-level course is for students interested in writing fiction as a means of both critical and creative engagement. Over the course of the semester we will read works that reflect a range of aesthetic approaches in order to broaden our exposure to literature and enrich our palettes as emerging practitioners. Readings will include stories from authors such as Angela Carter, John Cheever, and Italo Calvino, as well as narratives from contemporary and classical authors in translation. Through our own creative work, and the close, critical reading of our stories, we will try to become better artisans of language and narrative.  Class size: 14

 

18326

WRIT 238

 the song of a page: Short Prose Forms for Poets

Michael Ives

 T  Th    3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 308

PA

PART

Nietzsche, perhaps anticipating Twitter or SnapChat, thought it possible to say in ten sentences what many say in a whole book. A master of the aphorism, he believed condensation could penetrate rather than just abbreviate. In this course we will take up the challenge, and practice compression by writing prose that begins and ends on a single page. As poets have always known, brevity is a catalyst to invention. We will focus on the sentence, rather than the line, to investigate exactly how the syntax of narrative and description conveys the movement of thought. Among the short forms we will examine are early and post- modern prose sequences, micro-fictions, guide book entries, capsule reviews, the précis, the Haibun, the parable, and notebook and journal entries. Among the writers included will be: John Ashbery, Samuel Becket, Thomas Bernhard, Lydia Davis, Russell Edson, Max Jacob, Franz Kafka, Daniil Kharms, Tan Lin, Harry Mathews, Harryett Mullen, Leslie Scalapino, the sinologist Edward Schafer, scent expert Luca Turin, Paul Valery, and Joe Wenderoth. Admission by portfolio only. Though priority will be given to students intending eventually to write a senior project in poetry, all are welcome to submit for admission. For admission to this class, please send a writing sample by December 9th to Michael Ives at ives@bard.edu.  Class size: 12

 

18327

WRIT 244

 Imagining Nonhuman Consciousness

Benjamin Hale

 T  Th    1:30 pm-2:50 pm

HEG 201

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights  Philosopher Thomas Nagel asked, “What is it like to be a bat?” Ultimately, he determined the question unanswerable: A bat’s experience of the world is so alien to our own that it remains inaccessible to human cognitive empathy.  That’s arguable.  But it is true at least that a bat’s experience—or that of any other nonhuman consciousness—is not inaccessible to human imagination.  In this course we will read and discuss a wide variety of texts, approaching the subject of nonhuman consciousness through literature, philosophy, and science.  We will read works that attempt to understand the experiences of apes, panthers, rats, ticks, elephants, octopuses, lobsters, cows, bats, monsters, puppets, computers, and eventually, zombies. Course reading may include Descartes, Kafka, Rilke, Jakob von Uexküll, Patricia Highsmith, John Gardner’s Grendel, J.A. Baker’s The Peregrine, Eduardo Kohn’s How Forests Think, David Foster Wallace, Temple Grandin, Frans de Waal, Jane Goodall, Thomas Nagel, John Searle, Susan Datich, E. O. Wilson, Giorgio Agamben, and Bennett Sims’s A Questionable Shape, among others, in addition to a viewing of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later, and possibly other films. This is also a craft class, as each student will produce a substantial project over the semester.  The assignments will be open-ended, open to both creative and analytical works; a major component of the class will be incorporating these ideas into our own writing. This course is part of the Thinking Animals Initiative, an interdivisional collaboration among students and faculty to further the understanding of animals and human-animal relationships.  Students interested in this workshop must email bhale@bard.edu by December 9th for instructions.  Class size: 15

 

18328

WRIT 318

 reading and writing The Personal Essay

Susan Rogers

  W         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 200

PA

PART

This course involves equal parts reading and writing and is for students who want to develop their creative writing and analytic thinking. Readings are taken from Philip Lopate’s The Art of the Personal Essay, which traces the long tradition of the personal essay from Seneca through Montaigne (the father of the personal essay), and on to contemporary stylists such as Richard Rodriguez and Joan Didion. The personal essay is an informal essay that begins in the details of everyday life and expands to a larger idea. Emphasis is placed on reading closely to discover the craft of the work: how scenes and characters are developed, how dialogue can be used, how the form can fracture from linear narrative to the collage. Students’ works—three long essays—are critiqued in a workshop format. The course is for students with experience in writing workshops, fiction writers and poets who want to explore another genre, and writers who enjoy expressing ideas through the lens of personal experience. Those who bring knowledge from other disciplines are encouraged to apply. This course is restricted to students who have taken at least one previous Written Arts course (in any genre: fiction, poetry, or nonfiction). No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

18329

WRIT 324

 The Fictional Self

Dinaw Mengestu

M           3:10 pm – 5:30 pm

OLIN 308

PA

PART

This advanced writing seminar will examine the ways writers have employed, manipulated and distorted the authorial self . Over the course of the semester we will look at contemporary and historical uses of the alter-ego (or fictional self) in poetry, literary essays and in works of fiction. Authors will include Jorge Louis Borges, Philip Roth, Lorrie Moore, David Foster Wallace, Gwendolyn Brooks, James Baldwin and James Joyce. We will explore the ways writers have used the veneer of reality to move into more complicated, imagined realms, as well as the way other writers have sought to deliberately distort and challenge the “real self.” This is a writing intensive seminar and students will be expected to generate a substantial body of literary fiction while also responding critically to the readings and the works of their peers.   Class size: 14

 

18149

WRIT 328

 The Poetic Sequence

Ann Lauterbach

 T           1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 306

PA

PART

From T.S. Eliot’s canonical 1922 The Waste Land to Layli Long Soldier’s debut 2017 collection Whereas, modern and contemporary poets have found in the sequence or serial poem formal ways to shift tone and focus while maintaining common thematic elements. As M.L. Rosenthal remarked, “this genre is actually the modern poetic form within which all the tendencies of more than a century of experiment define themselves and their aesthetic purpose”. We will read some of these works and discuss their effects on narrative coherence, sonic impact, and how the use of fragment, repetition and variation open the possibilities of meaning.  Readings from: Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot, H.D., Wallace Stevens, William C. Williams, Adrienne Rich, George Oppen, John Ashbery, Nathaniel Mackey, Ted Berrigan, Leslie Scalapino, Fred Moten, Michael Palmer, Harryette Mullen, Rosemarie Waldrop, Fanny Howe, Simone White.  Weekly written responses.   One term project. Immediately after registering online, applicants for this class must email lauterba@bard.edu, explaining their interest in the course and providing information about their reading and writing backgrounds.  Class size: 12

 

18330

WRIT 330

 blown deadlines: a course in Journalistic Writing

Wyatt Mason

  W         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 302

PA

PART

Journalism: the root of the word (from jour, in French, meaning "day") suggests writing that's disposable -- good for a day but gone tomorrow. And yet, some of the most enduring writing was born out of journalistic necessity. Today, as journalism is branded "fake news" and as our current president is telling the world that journalists "are among the most dishonest human beings on Earth," this course will engage with the methods and metaphysics of truthful reporting. We will explore the formal variety of the greatest examples of deadline writing, with readings from the old guard -- De Quincey, Hazlitt, Baudelaire, Twain, Orwell -- as well as from the recent past and present -- Guy Davenport, Leonard Michaels, Susan Sontag, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, Mary McCarthy, Hannah Arendt, Norman Mailer, James Wood, Katharine Boo, Patrick Radden Keefe, John Sullivan, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, and others. These readings will be married to student writing that will analyze the various forms we'll encounter -- narratives with argument; reported pieces (including profiles and process pieces); satires; critical essays; hybrids of all these -- as we attempt our own essays in these modes. A letter to the professor, explaining your interest in the topic, required prior to registration. Please email letters to wmason@bard.edu. Class size: 12

 

18150

WRIT 332

 Advanced Contemporary Poetics

Dawn Lundy Martin

M           1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

PA

D+J

PART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Experimental Humanities  This course will be a course in interdisciplinary making/creating and innovative reading. We will investigate the evolving fields of poetry and poetics through a critical and creative lens with a particular eye turned toward poetries, practices, and theories as they are enacted and put forth by writers of color. In this class, we will think and work across genres (poetry, prose), mediums (page, canvas, digital, film, or theatrical space), and disciplines (writing, literary criticism, visual arts, drama choreography, history, etc.),  and collapse the walls between presenter and audience, creator and critic, as we work individually and collaboratively toward new modes of making/creating. Writers and readings include Myung Mi Kim, Simone White, Sontag's Reborn, Douglas Kearney, Hoa Nguyen, John Cage, Ellen Gallagher (visual artist), and Adrienne Kennedy (playwright). Students should submit a short letter of interest and a brief (2-3 page) writing sample by December 9th to ccape@bard.edu.

Class size: 12

 

18151

WRIT 334

 Writing the Roots

Robert Kelly

  W         4:00 pm-5:20 pm

SHAFER

PA

PART

2 credits  What can a word tell us about its thing?  The poet Charles Olson used to talk about ‘running a word,’ tracing it back to its sources.  Etymology reveals social and physical conditions in history which in turn condition what words mean to us, how we think with them, how we use them. A small conference group will investigate by writing from and through what the words can teach us.  This is a writing workshop in terms of the work to be done.

Class size: 7

 

18331

WRIT 336

 Prose Studio

Luc Sante

 T           1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 200

PA

PART

Just as the visual arts employ studios to stretch muscles, refine technique, and launch ideas, so this class functions for writers of fiction and nonfiction. Every week there are paired reading and writing exercises concerning, e.g., voice, stance, texture, rhythm, recall, palette, focus, compression, word choice, rhetoric, and timing. For serious writers only. This course is restricted to students who have taken at least one previous Written Arts course (in any genre: fiction, poetry, or nonfiction). No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 12

 

18577

WRIT 339

 location, location, location: Writing and Place

Joseph O'Neill

M           11:50 am-2:10 pm

OLIN 303

PA

PART

The dimension of the setting—geophysical, cultural, atmospheric—is an essential and often neglected aspect of fiction writing, in part because of the difficulty of descriptive writing.  In this workshop, we’ll be reading a variety of short texts, fictional and nonfictional, by Capote, Dickens, O’Connor, Calvino, Davis and others; and we'll be writing work that explores the power of environment, be it the mountaintop, the boulevard, or the void. Class size: 14

 

18332

WRIT 350

 Short Short Story Workshop

Mona Simpson

    F        11:00 am-12:00 pm

+ dates to be arranged

HDR ANX 106

PA

PART

In this course, students will read, reread, discuss, and respond in writing to a number of short stories with a view to analyzing how they function and how students can adapt the writers' forms, styles, approaches, and other tools in their own work. The class will start with works in translation: Chekhov, Tolstoy, and Flaubert; then move to Hawthorne, Munro, Trevor, and Yiyun Li. Close reading and weekly essays will be an important part of the class, as will long-term writing projects (short stories, personal or critical essays, etc.). This low-residency seminar convenes in person for six meetings over the course of the semester, with weekly discussions held via video conferencing. In addition, students are expected to make time for one-one-one virtual meetings with the professor. Immediately after registering online, applicants for this class must email a five-to-twenty-page double-spaced *PDF* sample of their strongest fiction and/or nonfiction to date to mesimpson@bard.edu. Class size: 10

 

18333

WRIT 405

 Senior Colloquium: Written Arts

Ben Hale

M           4:45 pm-6:00 pm

OLIN 202

 

 

 The Senior Colloquium in the Written Arts is an important supplement to the Senior Project. It has several objectives: intellectual/artistic, social, and vocational. The primary purpose is to guide seniors, both practically and philosophically, in the daunting task of creating a coherent and inspired creative work of high quality within a single academic year. Emphasis is on demystifying the project process, including its bureaucratic hurdles, as well as exploring the role of research in the creative realm, and helping students use each other as a critical and inspirational resource during this protracted solitary endeavor, sharing works in progress when appropriate. This supplements but never supplants the primary and sacrosanct role of the project adviser. Program faculty and alumni/ae, career development and other staff, and outside speakers (such as editors, translators, MFA graduates and directors, publishing personnel, etc.) contribute their collective wisdom and experience, sharing the myriad ways in which writers move an idea toward full creative realization, and giving a glimpse of the kinds of internships and careers available to the writer. Required for students enrolled in a Written Arts Senior Project. All such students are enrolled automatically by the Registrar.  Class size: 20

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18344

FILM 312

 Advanced Screenwriting

Elizabeth Krueger

M           1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts

 

18471

THTR 107 A

 Intro to Playwriting

Thome

 T           1:30 pm-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC STUDIO NORTH

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts 

 

18472

THTR 107 B

 Intro to Playwriting

Jorge Cortinas

  W         1:30 pm-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC STUDIO NORTH

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts