92093

WRIT 121 A

 Fiction Workshop I

Mary Caponegro

 T  Th    10:10 -11:30 am

RKC 200

PA

PART

This introductory-level course is for students interested in writing fiction. Over the course of the semester we will read works that reflect a range of aesthetic approaches. We will employ an array of open-ended exercises for the first half of the term, so as to isolate particular aspects of story-making. Emphasis will be on the evolution of narrative from causal elements, and on the development of technique. Close reading of published fiction will be an integral part of our endeavors, and student fiction will be critiqued in workshop format. This course is restricted to first-year students, registration will take place in August. No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

92094

WRIT 121 B

 Fiction Workshop I

Benjamin Hale

M  W      3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 304

PA

PART

See above.  Class size: 14

 

92095

WRIT 122

 Nonfiction Workshop I

Wyatt Mason

 T  Th    3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN  310

PA

PART

This course presents the breadth of formal possibilities available to writers of short nonfiction. Students workshop—i.e., read and comment on​—published pieces by Montaigne, Baudelaire, Poe, Twain, ​Nellie Bly, ​George Orwell, Joan Didion, ​James Baldwin, Guy Davenport, Leonard Michaels,​ ​Susan Sontag, Ben Metcalf,​ Leslie Jameson,​ David Foster Wallace,​ Claudia Rankine, Maggie Nelson, Ben Lerner, Moira Donegan, Ta-Nehesi Coates,​ John Jeremiah Sullivan​, Thomas Chatterton Williams, ​Adrian Nicole LeBlanc ​and ​Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah​. Workshopping these established writers enables students to learn both what a piece of nonfiction writing is as well as how to workshop ​a piece of writing. In addition to short writing exercises throughout the term, the course will ​ask that students attempt​ two​ ​substantial pieces of nonfiction writing of their own, guided by formal lessons learned through reading the best in the form. This course is restricted to first-year students, registration will take place in August. No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 12

 

92096

WRIT 123 A

 Poetry Workshop I

Michael Ives

 T  Th    11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 101

PA

PART

Open to students who have never had a workshop in poetry and who desire to experiment with making their own writing a means of learning both about literature and poetry and about the discipline of making works of art. Attention is mainly on the student’s own production, the individual’s awareness of what sorts of activities, rhythms, and tellings are possible in poetry, and how poets go about learning from their own work. The central work of the course is the student’s own writing, along with the articulation, private and shared, of response to it. Readings are undertaken in contemporary and traditional poets, according to the needs of the group, toward the development of familiarity with poetic form, poetic movement, and poetic energy. Attendance at various evening poetry readings and lectures is required. This course is restricted to first-year students, registration will take place in August. No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

92097

WRIT 123 B

 Poetry Workshop I

Michael Ives

 T  Th    3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 107

PA

PART

See above.  Class size: 14

 

92098

WRIT 245

 Hybrid Narratives

Dinaw Mengestu

  W         11:50 -2:10 pm

OLIN 107

PA

PART

While we often divide literature into distinct categories and genres—poetry, nonfiction, fiction—writers have always strayed across these boundaries, borrowing from other forms and genres to create hybrid texts that are a product of multiple literary styles, techniques, and traditions. Over the course of the semester we will read from a broad range of classical and contemporary writers whose work is a deliberate hybrid of form, style, and genre. We will read essays that have the texture and imagination of a short story; stories that are closer to poems, journalists who use the tools common to fiction, and novelists whose work straddles the line between autobiography and fiction. Our reading for the semester will be based around broad, thematic concerns. We will discuss the relationship between form and content; the ethics of narration; and, ultimately, how we can apply the tools and techniques of the writers we’ve read to our own creative and critical writing. This is a writing-intensive course. Students will be expected to write short, critical responses throughout the semester, as well as generate a substantial body of creative text. Class size: 14

 

92099

WRIT 324

 fiction workshop III

Benjamin Hale

 T           11:50 -2:10 pm

OLIN 307

PA

PART

This is a workshop in prose fiction for advanced students. Students are expected to submit at least two works of fiction to the workshop and critique their peers’ writings. This course is restricted to students who have taken at least one previous Written Arts workshop (in any genre: fiction, poetry, or nonfiction). No writing sample or personal statement is required after registering.  Class size: 14

 

92085

WRIT 337

 Language as Poetry

Robert Kelly

  W         4:00 -5:20 pm

SHAFER

PA

PART

2 credits  Ordinary speech is the well-spring of poetry in English, from Chaucer to our day. Focus will be on the poetics of listening: to speech, text, silence. The course will emphasize writing, writing as a way of knowing, writing as a daily practice. No writing samples need be submitted, but consult with Robert Kelly by email (kelly@bard.edu) or in person before registering. Class size: 7

 

92083

WRIT 342

 The Long-Form Memoir

Daniel Mendelsohn

  W         1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 307

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Literature  This advanced writing seminar, designed for upper-level students with solid experience—particularly those interested in producing a long-form memoir as a senior project—will be involve both extensive reading in the memoir and regular writing exercises, culminating in a lengthy final project (25 pp or more). Readings will cover everything from Classical Antiquity to the recent resurgence of memoir as a major literary form, and will explore categories from political memoir (Julius Caesar, Elizabeth Cady Stanton), social history memoir (Saint-Simon), literary memoir (Nabokov, George Sand), trauma/ cataclysm memoir (Equiano, Primo Levi, Kathryn Harrison’s The Kiss), bibliomemoir (Rebecca Mead’s My Life in Middlemarch, Elif Batuman’s The Possessed), spiritual/redemption memoir (St. Augustine, James Frey) and sex and sexuality memoir (Casanova, Mendelsohn’s The Elusive Embrace, Toni Bentley’s The Surrender). A letter to the professor (mendelso@bard.edu) explaining your interest in the subject and including a substantial writing sample is required for consideration for this course.  Class size: 12

 

92101

WRIT 405

 Senior Colloquium: Written Arts

Dinaw Mengestu

M           4:40 -6:00 pm

OLINLC 115

 

 

1 credit. The Senior Colloquium in the Written Arts is an important supplement to the Senior Project. It has several objectives: intellectual/artistic, social, and vocational. The primary purpose is to guide seniors, both practically and philosophically, in the daunting task of creating a coherent and inspired creative work of high quality within a single academic year. Emphasis is on demystifying the project process, including its bureaucratic hurdles, as well as exploring the role of research in the creative realm, and helping students use each other as a critical and inspirational resource during this protracted solitary endeavor, sharing works in progress when appropriate. This supplements but never supplants the primary and sacrosanct role of the project adviser. Program faculty and alumni/ae, career development and other staff, and outside speakers (such as editors, translators, MFA graduates and directors, publishing personnel, etc.) contribute their collective wisdom and experience, sharing the myriad ways in which writers move an idea toward full creative realization, and giving a glimpse of the kinds of internships and careers available to the writer. Required for students enrolled in a Written Arts Senior Project. All such students are enrolled automatically by the Registrar, and should not (cannot) register themselves manually for Colloquium.  Class size: 20

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

92086

LIT 3041

 POETICS OF THE CITY: The New York School OF POETRY AND CRITICISM

Ann Lauterbach

 T           1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 306

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Written Arts 

 

92100

LIT 345

 Difficulty

Joseph O'Neill

M           11:50 -2:10 pm

OLIN 107

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Written Arts 

 

92082

LIT 351

 Journalism betwEEn Fact and  Fiction

Nuruddin Farah

 T           10:10 -12:30 pm

ASP 302

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Written Arts

 

92133

ANTH 351

 The Interview

John Ryle

 T           1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 303

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Film and Electronic Arts; Human Rights; Written Arts