19170

LIT 221

 AraBic LitERATURE, World LitERATURE, AND THE UntranslaTABLE

Ziad Dallal

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 309

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Middle Eastern Studies  World Literature retains a central but debatable prestige in contemporary literary studies. Some view World Literature as an inevitable consequence of a more-connected world in the wake of the global marketplace; others view it as a term which conceals asymmetrical linguistic power relations and furthers the power of English as a literary language. Certainly, Arabic literature has been globally received through the category of World Literature. This course assesses different understandings of “World Literature” and in turn complicates our contemporary reception of Arabic Literature. We will read Arabic literary texts and pair them with a diverse selection of theoretical material, examining the problematics and politics of translation. This course will read Arabic authors from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century, such as Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, Tayyib Salih, Naguib Mahfouz, and Mohamed el-Bisatie. Theoretical readings will include essays by Emily Apter, Gayatri Spivak, Pascal Casanova, David Damrosch.  This course is part of the World Literature offering. Class size: 20

 

19188

LIT 2404

 Fantastic Journeys in the Modern World

Jonathan Brent

    F        3:00-5:20 pm

OLIN 201

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Jewish Studies; Russian Studies  Russian   We will  explore the literature of the Fantastic of Eastern Europe and Russia from the early 20th century to the 1960s in writers such as Ansky, Kharms, Kafka, Capek, Schultz, Mayakovsky, Erofeyev, Olesha and others.  Fantastic literature, as Calvino has noted, takes as its subject the problem of "reality." In this class, we will discuss questions of identity, meaning, consciousness, as well as understanding of the relationship between the individual and society in these writers. This course is part of the World Literature offering. Class size: 22

 

19540

LIT 393

 TEN PLAYS THAT SHOOK THE WORLD

Justus Rosenberg

   T         10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 107

LA

ELIT

A close reading and textual analysis of plays considered milestones in the history of the theater.  In this course we isolate and examine the artistic, social and psychological components that made these works become part of the literary canon.   Have they lasted because they conjure up fantasies of escape, or make its readers and viewers face dilemmas inherent in certain social conditions or archetypical conflicts?   What was it exactly that made them so shocking when first performed?  The language, theme, style, staging?  We also explore the theatre as a literary genre that goes beyond the writing.  For a meaningful and effective performance, all aspects of the play, directing, acting, staging, lighting will be considered.  This course is part of the World Literature offering.  Class size: 15

 

19166

SPAN 238

 READING THE BEAST: Bestiaries & Beast Fables IN MODERN LITERATURE

Melanie Nicholson

 T  Th    1:10-2:50 pm

OLINLC 115

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies  What place do animals hold in our conception of the world in the twenty-first century? How do cultural representations of animals, particularly in literature, reflect (or fail to reflect) our interactions with the flesh-and-blood creatures that have inspired them? The bestiary and the beast fable are two traditional ways humans have used animals to tell stories about themselves. This course examines the surprising reemergence and reconfiguration of these ancient modes in modern literary texts across a range of genres. The main corpus of Latin American works will be read in dialogue with other fables and bestiaries from North America and Europe. Authors include Apollinaire, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Clarice Lispector, Augusto Monterroso, Pablo Neruda, and David Sedaris. This course is part of the Thinking Animals Initiative, an interdivisional collaboration among students and faculty to further the understanding of animals and human-animal relationships. Taught in English. This course is part of the World Literature offering.

Class size: 22