92328

LIT 2060

 THE ARABIC NOVEL

Elizabeth Holt

 W   F  10:10 am – 11:30 am

OLINLC 118

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies,  Middle Eastern Studies  In this course, we read a group of Arabic novels and short stories from Egypt, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, Sudan, and the wider Arab diaspora. Through this sampling of texts – in addition to accompanying critical literature, films, lectures, and discussion – students will gain a broad-based understanding of the history of Arabic literature, including its formal developments, genres, and themes. The selected texts provide an opportunity for the discussion of colonialism and post-colonialism, globalization, occupation and liberation, religion vs. secularization, Orientalism and Neo-Orientalism, Islam and the West, and gender and women issues. A critical stance toward the dominant narratives of Arabic literary history – especially that of the Arabic novel’s origin and development – calls into question the accepted canon of modern Arabic literature and the subjective processes of literary canonization generally speaking. Frequent written assignments and active class participation are required. Taught in English. This course is part of the World Literature offering. Class size: 22

 

92256

CLAS 211

 Gender & Sexuality in the Ancient World

Lauren Curtis

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 202

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies This course explores ancient Greek and Roman ideas about human sexuality and gender difference. Examining the worlds of myth, literature, and art, we will ask how bodies, spaces, and cultural institutions were gendered in the ancient world and try to assess how ancient discourses about normative and transgressive sexual practices and gender identities may be similar or different to our own. Topics will include ancient medical writing about reproduction and childbirth, issues of power, slavery, and prostitution, the relationship between homoeroticism and education, and the performance of gender on the Athenian stage. All readings will be in English. This course is part of the World Literature offering.  Class size: 22

 

92015

LIT 253

 Isaac Babel & the aesthetics of Revolution

Jonathan Brent

    F        3:00-5:20 pm

OLIN 201

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Jewish Studies; Russian Studies  Class size: 22 Isaac Babel (1894-1940) was one of the most perplexing geniuses of twentieth century Russian and European literature.  Babel enlisted as a Jew in the famously anti-Semitic Cossack division of the Red Cavalry in 1920 and soon thereafter became one of the most famous writers in Soviet Russia; he escaped the fury of the Great Terror of 1937-38 only to be arrested in the spring of 1939 and shot as a traitor in 1940.  The sum total of his writings was meager in comparison with that of most of his contemporaries; his political ambiguities are frequently infuriating; his defiant ironies often without clear target; his captivating literary style a puzzle of images and absences. He spoke of himself as “the master of the genre of silence.”  In this class, we will attempt to unravel some of his many paradoxes through close readings of his masterpiece Red Cavalry, the 1920 Diary and The Odessa Stories. Background critical and historical texts, such as writings by Leon Trotsky, A. K. Voronsky, Vladimir Mayakovsky and pronouncements and documents of the Soviet government will provide a framework for understanding Babel’s struggle as both Jew and Russian, as both a writer deeply imbued with the spirit of western humanism and one committed to the triumph of the Bolshevik Revolution, and as both an incessant prankster and reflective spiritual vagabond.  This class will examine his many attempts at finding a literary center that resolves the radical contradictions between his relation to tradition and to the growing nightmare of Soviet reality. This course is part of the World Literature offering.   Class size: 20

 

92327

LIT 354

 Global Cultural Cold War

Elizabeth Holt

  T          10:10-12:30 pm

HDR 101A

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Latin American & Iberian Studies; Middle Eastern Studies  In the wake of WWII, the Americans and Soviets vied for global cultural influence as part of the decades-long Cold War, with both Cominform and the CIA's own Congress for Cultural Freedom facing off in a propaganda culture war.  From the Bandung conference in 1955 and its calls for nonalignment and Afro-Asian solidarity, anti-colonial and decolonizing struggles articulated a Third World revolutionary aesthetic.  This course reads diplomatic history, archival documents, and recent scholarship on the cultural Cold War alongside journal excerpts and novels by authors including Arthur Koestler, Tayeb Salih, Richard Wright, Allen Ginsberg, Ghassan Kanafani, Layla Baalbaki, Chinua Achebe, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Marlon James, and Viet Thanh Nguyen.  This course is a Literature Junior Seminar and a World Literature course.  Class size: 15