TECHNIQUE:

 

92184

THTR 107 A

 Intro to Playwriting

Jorge Cortinas

 T           1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

STUDIO NORTH

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts   An introductory course that focuses on discovering the writer’s voice. Through writing exercises based on dreams, visual images, poetry, social issues, found text, and music, each writer is encouraged to find his or her unique language, style, and vision.  A group project will explore the nature of collaborative works.  Students learn elements of playwriting through writing a one-act play, reading assignments, and class discussions. All students welcome, preference to Theater majors.  (No writing sample required.)   Class size: 12

 

92185

THTR 107 B

 Intro to Playwriting

Jorge Cortinas

  W         1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

STUDIO NORTH

PA

PART

See above.  Class size: 12

 

92186

THTR 107 C

 Intro to Playwriting

Chiori Miyagawa

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

STUDIO NORTH

PA

PART

See above. Class size: 12

 

92187

THTR 110 A

 The Actor & the Moment

Lynn Hawley

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

PART

In this class we examine how an actor brings truth to the smallest unit of performance. The richness of the moment is created by the imaginative, physical, psychological, intellectual and emotional qualities that the actor brings to it. We explore ways to gain access to richly layered authenticity through games, improvisations, individual creations and exercises in given circumstance.  Students are given tools to transcend accepted logic, embrace risk-taking, and live fully in the present.  Class size: 16

 

92188

THTR 110 B

 The Actor & the Moment

Jonathan Rosenberg

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

PART

See above. Class size: 16

 

92189

THTR 110 C

 The Actor & the Moment

Jean Wagner

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

PART

See above.  Class size: 16

 

92686

THTR 110 D

 The Actor & the Moment

Jean Wagner

 . W  F    1:30-2:50 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

PART

 

92190

THTR 203

 Directing Seminar

Jonathan Rosenberg

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Film & Electronic Arts This class introduces students to fundamental practical and theoretical concepts in directing. The art and craft of the director involves the close analysis of texts, the conceptualizing of a production, the translation of the text into the language of the stage, and the work with collaborators including actors and designers. The exploration in this class includes exercises examining the language of the stage, analytical and practical work on texts, and an examination of the work and writings of seminal directors. There will be weekly assignments of work that will be brought in and examined in class and one longer more substantial project for the end of the semester.  Class size: 10

 

92191

THTR 209

 Intermediate Acting: Scene Study I

Lynn Hawley

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

PART

This is a studio acting class where students will discover their unique process as an actor through rehearsal and performance of scenes primarily from modern and contemporary American Theater. We will explore the different ways an actor approaches a text, and how to mine a text. We will practice effective rehearsal methods, learn how to ask questions about character, how to develop circumstances, and how to tell a story through action. Prerequisite: The Actor and the Moment. Class size: 10

 

92193

THTR 226

 Intermediate Acting: Mask

Geoff Sobelle

M           1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

 

PART

This class covers the rudiments of mask work as taught by Jacques Lecoq.  We will be focusing on three styles of mask work in particular: neutral; character; and Commedia dell’Arte.  The neutral mask is the root from which all physical theatre grows.  Students learn physical/compositional principles such as balance, presence, breath, focus and rhythm through a rigorous study of movement analysis.  Character masks introduce an element of psychology, which creates a new range of performance possibilities.  Commedia dell’Arte adds appetite and desire, leading students to archetype, extreme character, physical comedy and the creation of lazzi.  Mask is a marriage of physical precision with emotional/psychological abandon.  Students will learn mask technique on their feet and in their body, through structured improvisation in class.  They will apply the principles that they have studies to create performances and character studies that will be performed in class and critiqued.  Class size: 16

 

92192

THTR 243

 Introductory Voice for Actors

Elizabeth Dickinson

M           1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

 STUDIO NORTH

PA

PART

This course introduces actors and performers to the fundamentals of voice work and its application to text. Students first develop their vocal apparatus by applying a range of techniques (including Fitzmaurice Voicework, Linklater, and yoga) to rid the body of tension and free the authentic voice. From this place of release, students will then learn to safely support their voices, allowing greater range and variety of vocal character. Students will be taught to apply this broadened vocal pallet to the performance of text, discovering the possibilities available through both exploration and conscious shifts in the voice and body. The result will be a profound connection between body, breath, voice and language. Students will also leave with a toolkit of safe warm ups and preparatory exercises that can be used in rehearsals and private practice. While the course is primarily intended for Theater & Performance students, it may be of interest to others who which to develop their public speaking skills. This course fulfills a Technique requirement in the Theater & Performance Program.   Class size: 14

 

92194

THTR 307

 Advanced Acting:Scene Study II

Jack Ferver

    F        10:10-1:10 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

PART

This is a studio acting class where students will explore scenes from challenging plays of varied styles. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Pre-requisites: Intro to Acting and Scene Study, or by permission of the instructor. Class size: 12

 

 

CONTEXT:

 

92195

THTR 145

 Intro to Theater & Performance

Miriam Felton-Dansky

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

FISHER PAC

STUDIO NORTH

AA

AART

This course introduces a sequence of key concepts and ideas in world theater, and should ideally be taken at the start of a student’s journey through the Theater and Performance curriculum.  We will base our discussions on primary and secondary texts and modes of performance from 2,500 years of world theater, starting with Aristotle and the Greek tragic playwrights and approaching the cutting edge of contemporary performance practice.  We will ask questions about interpretation, ephemerality, and reenactment, investigate how great artists from across the centuries have controlled our experience of theatrical time and space, and examine such topics as the representation of reality on stage, the relationship between performance and audience, and the constantly evolving interplay of theater and democracy.  Class size: 22

 

92196

THTR 146

 Intro to Theater History

Miriam Felton-Dansky

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

STUDIO NORTH

AA

AART

Where should a study of theater begin, and how did pre-modern models of theater change, as successive societies revised, rejected, and appropriated the forms that had gone before? This course will investigate selected periods in world theater, beginning with the massive communal festivals of ancient Greece and culminating in the philosophical upheavals of the Enlightenment. Paying close attention to connections between drama, stagecraft, and modes of spectatorship, we will ask how the theater has shored up political power; how the stage has served as a scale model for the known world; and what has been at stake in changing notions of classicism. Through analytical essays, class presentations, and a final performance project, we will cultivate a critical vocabulary for discussing theaters of the past—and discover their often-surprising legacies in modern and contemporary performance. Priority will be given to intended Theater & Performance majors.  Class size: 22

 

92198

THTR 317

 20th Century Avant Garde PerformancE

Jean Wagner

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

FISHER PAC

STUDIO NORTH

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Art History, Experimental Humanities, Literature  "Set fire to the library shelves!" wrote the Italian Futurists in their first manifesto of 1909. With their revolutionary politics, audience provocations, and enthusiastic embrace of the new, the Futurists inaugurated a century of avant-garde performance. This course will investigate that century, tracing the European and American theatrical avant-gardes from 1909 to 1995, including movements and artists such as Expressionism, Surrealism and Dada; John Cage, Allan Kaprow, and Happenings; utopian collectives of the 1960s; Peter Handke, Heiner Müller, the Wooster Group and Reza Abdoh. We will explore questions including: the implications of assuming the mantle of the "avant-garde"; the contested status of the dramatic text in avant-garde performance; the relationship between performance and emerging media forms; and avant-garde artists’ efforts to create radical fusions of art and life. This course will require a research paper, reading responses, and a presentation.  Class size: 15

 

92315

THTR 352

 South African Theater

Jonathan Rosenberg

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

RKC 200

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Human Rights  The theater of contemporary South Africa is inextricably linked to its history and politics. In this class, we will divide that history into two broad periods: the years of Apartheid from the election of the National Party government in 1948 to the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in 1990, and the post-Apartheid years from 1990 to the present. From the earlier period, we will examine the texts and performers that evolved into a theater that protested the society that evolved under Apartheid from playwrights such as Athol Fugard to theater makers such as the Junction Avenue Theatre Company, Mbongeni Ngema, Percy Mtwa, and Barney Simon to performers such as Pieter-Dirk Uys and John Kani. We will then look at how theater artists evolved to articulate the complexity of the post-Apartheid era. We will examine the work of writers such as Mike Van Graan, Mpumelelo Paul Grootboom, Zakes Mda, Reza de Wet and Aubrey Sekhabi, and theater makers such as Brett Bailey, Lara Foot, Yael Farber and William Kentridge with the Handspring Puppet Company. Students will be asked for regular written reflections on the work as well as more extensive in-class presentations.  Class size: 15

 

 

CREATIVE PRACTICE & RESEARCH

 

92199

THTR 213

 Writing Plays USING FACTS AND DATA

Chiori Miyagawa

  W         1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER PAC CONFERENCE ROOM

PA

PART

Cross-listed:  Written Arts   This is a writing workshop that explores ways to dramatize nonfictional sources. The course encourages students to find inspiration in facts and theatricalize them rather than adapting already fictional materials such as novels and period plays. The students will write several short plays using a variety of interesting phenomena and data.   For the final project, students will choose their own nonfiction inspiration to write a one-act play.  Prerequisite: 1 creative writing workshop class.  This course fulfills a Creative Practice requirement in Theater & Performance.  Class size: 12

 

92200

THTR 224

 Design Studio

David Szlasa

M           10:10-1:10 pm

FISHER PAC

 STUDIO NORTH

PA

PART

This course will introduce students to the development and implementation of design techniques for the stage.  Through a series of case studies we will explore the history and semiotics of scenic, lighting, and new media design, watching production recordings from a range of artists including Ralph Lemon, Julie Taymor, Big Art Group, and Robert Wilson, and reading texts from Walter Benjamin, Mashall McLuhan, and Quentin Fiore to The Backstage Handbook.  In parallel practical units students will study the basics of scenic design, from rigging and carpentry to rendering, lighting, and projections.  The course will culminate in a design project in the form of a model construction and/or digital rendering, which will combine dramaturgical and historical research with design techniques acquired over the semester.  Class size: 12

 

92203

THTR 261

 Gender Theater

Jack Ferver

   Th       3:00-6:00 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

PA

D+J

PART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  How can we use the tools of theater to interrogate the way we perform gender – our own and other people’s? In this creative practice course, students will explore and challenge normative notions of gender to play with and destabilize prescriptive cultural roles. The semester begins with an overview of the impact of gender coding and “type-casting”; where and how theater, television, and film have accepted or refused the categorical branding of identity. Through improvisation and performance exercises, students will examine overt and covert societal rules surrounding the gender binary, and discover how the tools of drag, neo-camp, and hyperbole can enhance and/or subvert the performance of gender. Using their research from the semester, students will create longer final performances.  Class size: 12

 

92201

THTR 328

 Visual Performance

Adrienne Truscott

 T           3:00-6:00 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

 

PART

This studio course in performance art is primarily intended for advanced students in Theater & Performance and Studio Arts, though is open to all.  Commitment and courage are more important than technique.  Working individually and collaboratively, students will develop performance material based on various sources, including:  autobiography, specific characters, artists, or historical figures, dreams, fairy tales, myths.  By identifying, amplifying, and re-configuring the essential characteristics of characters or events, you will aim to give your ideas and choices performance life through unified combinations of visuals, text, movement, video and sound.  This process will include group viewing and discussion of performance documentation, imagery, and writing by performers, artists, creators, and filmmakers who have found inspiration articulating the possibilities of character delineation from specific sources, including the Wooster Group, Charles Ludlam, Dina Martina, Isaac Julien, Kazuo Ohno, and Eleanor Antin.   Class size: 16

 

92202

THTR 405

 Junior / Senior Colloquium

Miriam Felton Dansky

  W         6:30-8:00 pm

FISHER PAC RESNICK

 

 

0 credits  The Zócalo is the bi-weekly colloquium for the Theater & Performance Program. It is a forum in which students and faculty share news and ideas of relevance to the field and the Program, and to meet visiting artists and other guests. Several times each semester students present work-in-progress performances in the Zócalo, and receive structured feedback from their faculty and peers.  For students entering the College in or after Fall 2015 only: Moderated students in Theater & Performance are required to enroll in the course pass/fail for both semesters of their Junior and Senior years, and to pass all four semesters of the course. Students who have not moderated into Theater & Performance are also welcome to enroll. The Zócalo carries 0 credits.  Class size: 30