18185

SPAN 110

 Accelerated First Year Spanish

Lena Retamoso Urbano

M T W Th 1:30 pm-2:30 pm

OLINLC 115

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies  A first-year course designed for the student who has had some prior exposure to Spanish or who has excellent command of another Romance language. All the major topics in grammar will be covered, and the course will provide intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). The course will provide a streamlined review of basic topics in grammar and provide more detail and exercises for advanced topics. The textbook will be supplemented with authentic video material from Spain and 'Latin America. One additional hour per week of practice with the Spanish tutor and a substantial amount of work in the language resource center will also be required. The course will prepare the student for summer language programs abroad or Spanish 201 the following semester. Class size: 22

 

18186

SPAN 201

 Intermediate Spanish I

Javier Rodriguez Fernandez

 T W Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLINLC 115

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies  For students who have completed Spanish 106, 110, or the equivalent  (two or three solid years of high school Spanish). This course is designed to perfect the student's command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work. Permission of the instructor required for students who have not completed Spanish 106 or 110 at Bard. Class size: 22

 

18187

SPAN 202

 Intermediate Spanish II

Lena Retamoso Urbano

M T W  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 307

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies  This course continues refining the student's mastery of the four basic skills in Spanish at a post-intermediate level. The textbook offers an integration of literature, culture, and film. Our study of both visual and written texts focuses on critical thinking, interpretation, speaking, and writing skills. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or equivalent; permission of instructor required for those who have not completed 201 at Bard.

Class size: 18

 

18188

SPAN 212

 SpanISH for Heritage Speakers

Nicole Caso

M  W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLINLC 206

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies This course is for students who have been exposed to Spanish at home and wish to achieve confidence in speaking, writing, and reading the language. Grammar study capitalizes on prior contact with the language and allows more rapid progress than in a standard setting. We will emphasize written composition, accelerated grammar review, and the discussion of issues pertinent to Hispanic cultures. Prospective students must speak with instructor prior to registration.   Class size: 16

 

18189

SPAN 240

 Testimonies of Latin America

Nicole Caso

 T  Th    10:10 am-11:30 am

OLINLC 120

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights (core course); Latin American Studies  This course provides the opportunity for students to engage critically with texts that serve as a public forum for voices often silenced in the past. Students will also learn about the broader context of the hemisphere's history through the particular experiences of women from Bolivia, Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, and the U.S.-Latino community, including Rigoberta Menchú, Domitila Barrios de Chungara, and Cherríe Moraga.  We will read testimonial accounts documenting the priorities and concerns of women who have been marginalized for reasons of poverty, ethnic difference, political ideologies, or sexual preference.  The semester will be devoted to analyzing the form in which their memories are represented textually, and to the discussion of the historical circumstances that have led to their marginalization.  Some of the central questions that will organize our discussions are: how to represent memories of violence and pain? What are the ultimate effects of mediations of the written word, translations to hegemonic languages, and the interventions of well-intentioned intellectuals?  How best to use writing as a mechanism to trace a space for dignity and "difference"?  We will integrate films that portray the issues and time-periods documented in the diaries and testimonial narratives to be read - including "Men With Guns", "El Norte," "Historia oficial," and "Rojo amanecer."  Conducted in English.  Class size: 22

 

18190

SPAN 301

 Introduction to Spanish Literature

Javier Rodriguez Fernandez

 T  Th    11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLINLC 210

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies; Literature  This course explores some of the major literary works produced on the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the present day. Students will become familiar with the general contours of Spanish history as they study in depth a selected number of masterpieces, including works by Miguel de Cervantes, Calderón de la Barca, Teresa de Jesús, Cadalso, Larra, Galdós, Emilia PardoBazán, Unamuno, Lorca, and Carmen Laforet. The course will be organized around three thematic modules: Spanish culture’s engagement with notions of purity and pollution; the emergence and evolution of the first person singular in Spanish literature; and the representations of the country and the city, the center and the periphery. In each module we will undertake a survey of relevant literature occasionally put in conversation with the visual arts. Conducted in Spanish.   Class size: 18

 

18137

SPAN 324

 the broken voice: Surrealist PoetrY and Crisis in Spain

Javier Rodriguez Fernandez

  W  F    11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies  What could the muse possibly sing, when it found itself placed between the uncountable dead of the Great War (1914-18) and that somber prelude to the Second World War, the Spanish Civil War (1936-39)? Naturally, it faltered, it broke, toyed even with that possibility of silence that grazes nonsense. Spanish poetry in the late 1920s and early 1930s was symptomatically torn between its allegiance to the dehumanizing principles of the Avant-Garde and the growing pressures of political commitment deriving from a shifting, and confusing landscape. Against this horizon, Surrealism emerged as the last expression, the last “snapshot” of the European intelligentsia, and its promise to suture all wounds. Around the eventful year of 1929, a number of the most relevant Spanish poets of the 20th Century attuned their voices in the strident surrealist key. In this course, we will read, among other fascinatingly difficult, untranslatable books, Poeta en Nueva York, by Federico García Lorca, Sobre los ángeles and Yo era un tonto..., by Rafael Alberti, Un Río, un Amor, by Luis Cernuda, and Espadas como labios, by Vicente Aleixandre. Conducted in Spanish.

Class size: 14