92064

RUS 101

 Beginning Russian

Olga Voronina

M T W Th 9:00-10:00 am

OLINLC 118

FL

FLLC

A course for students with little or no previous knowledge of Russian that introduces the fundamentals of the spoken and written language as well as Russian culture. We will emphasize conversation, reading, and written proficiency and encourage creative expression in autobiographical and fictional compositions. Audio-visual materials will be an integral part of the learning process. In addition to regular class meetings, students are required to attend a one-hour-per-week tutorial. Beginning Russian will be followed by an intensive 8-credit course in the spring semester and a 4-credit summer language and culture program in St. Petersburg, Russia.  Class size: 22

 

92065

RUS 206

 Continuing Russian

Oleg Minin

M T  Th   9:00-10:00 am

OLINLC 210

FL

FLLC

This course is designed to continue refining students’ practice of speaking, listening, reading and writing in Russian. The focus is on the continuing acquisition of advanced grammar, pertinent vocabulary as well as reading and conversational skills enabling students to communicate effectively within the topics of everyday importance. Accuracy in using basic grammar constructions in speaking and writing in Russian is pursued and encouraged. Advanced grammar constructions are introduced through a wide variety of adapted texts and contexts. In addition to textbook material, students will be assigned readings of authentic and adapted Russian literary and journalistic texts: pertinent discussions, assignments as well as written and oral responses will entail elements of literary analysis and critique. Class size: 15

 

92029

RUS 220

 an Appointment with Dr. Chekhov

Marina Kostalevsky

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Literature  Anton Pavlovich Chekhov began writing simply to earn much needed money while studying to become a doctor at Moscow University.  His connection to the medical profession, and the natural sciences, is not mere biographical fact.  As Chekhov himself later admitted, "there is no doubt that my study of medicine strongly affected my work in literature." Moreover, he claimed that "the writer must be as objective as the chemist."  This course will give students the opportunity to analyse how Dr. Chekhov's "general theory of objectivity" impacted his writing and how his "treatment" of human nature and social issues, of love and family, all the big and “little things in life,” has brought an entirely new dimension to Russian literature and culture.  Readings include Chekhov's prose, plays, and letters.  Also, attention will be given to contemporary interpretations of his work, new biographical research, and productions of his plays on stage and screen. Conducted in English.  Class size: 16

 

92041

RUS 225

 Art of Russian Avant-Garde (1900-1934)

Oleg Minin

 T  Th 11:50 am–1:10 pm

OLIN 102

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Art History  This course will address major developments in Russian modern and avant-grade art in the first three decades of the 20th c. The course is multidisciplinary and will allow students to study particular movements, ideas and seminal names from Mikhail Vrubel and Symbolism to Vladimir Tatlin and Constructivism. Students will gain an insight into the aesthetic, theoretical and cultural concerns of the practitioners of Russian experimental arts that will supplement and enhance their knowledge of the more familiar movements in modern art history. This course aims to offer students an important methodology and context for the appreciation of the intrinsic evolution of Russian visual culture and its contribution to the international art arena. Major paintings, applied designs and architectural monuments form the visual material essential to this course, and they will be examined in chronological sequence. These artifacts will be described and analyzed for their own sake and also as symbols and manifestations of social, political, and philosophical developments in Russian modern history.  Class size: 22

 

92066

RUS 327

 Russian Opera: staging History, shaping Myths

Marina Kostalevsky

M           3:30-5:50 pm

OLIN 309

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Music  This course will offer the opportunity to explore Russian history through the medium of Russian opera. Russian culture represents an inseparable part of European cultural experience. And yet, it has a distinctly original character. Initially shaped by the Orthodox Christian tradition passed on from Byzantium, it eventually came into contact and conflict with the flow of West European ideas. It absorbed and confronted, transformed and blended the major creative achievements of the Old World with the unique Russian experience. Predictably, the history of Russian music followed that path. The early development of Russian music benefited from appropriation of the Byzantine unaccompanied choral singing and at the same time suffered from the absence of instrumental music. By comparison, the Western European music combined the use of vocal and instrumental faculties and resulted in the creation of numerous forms of musical art, including the most elaborate one: opera. The flourishing of this genre in Europe consequently had a direct impact on the progress of Russian musical culture. During the nineteenth century, opera became a powerful agent in Russia’s search for national identity.  The list of operas includes such masterpieces as A Life for the Tsar by Glinka, Boris Godunov and Khovanshchina by Mussorgsky, The Tsar's Bride by Rimsky-Korsakov, The Queen of Spades and Eugene Onegin by Tchaikovsky, War and Peace by Prokofiev, and Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk by Shostakovich. The assigned material will also include selected literary texts as well as video and audio recordings. You will also have a chance to attend a live performance of a Russian opera at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. No training in music is required. Conducted in English.  Class size: 12

 

92067

RUS 390

 Translation: Russian to English

Marina Kostalevsky

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

OLINLC 206

FL

FLLC

A practical and theoretical course consisting of regular weekly reading and translation of a variety of literary texts. Students will also work on an independent project throughout the semester. Texts include short stories and poems by Bunun, Chekhov, Babel, Tolstaya, Dovlatov, Akhmatova, Pasternak, and others.  Class size: 15