92306

PSY 121

 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Stuart Levine

  T  Th   3:10 – 4:30 pm

OLIN 101

SA

SSCI

Over the course of the semester we study theoretical insights and conceptual attempts to understand human behavior.  These are traced from the speculations within the Ancient World to current scientific thinking and methods guiding the study of psychology and other social science disciplines.  Importantly, because a discipline is also about people who advance it, students are introduced to the lives and times and ideas of individuals who have made significant contributions to the field.  Particular attention is given to such figures as James, Pavlov, Freud, Skinner and Asch, to mention just a few.  Illumination will also come from a consideration of correspondence between and among pivotal individuals in the field.  Critical analyses and integrations are juxtaposed with historical renderings.  Upper college students likely will benefit from this course because they already possess the foundational knowledge necessary to draw comparisons and critically evaluate varying points of view.  Lower college students likely will use the course to greet the intellectual domains they enter.  Class size: 22

 

91959

PSY 141 A

 Intro to Psychological Science

Justin Dainer-Best

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior  How does the mind create the reality we perceive? How do experiences shape the brain, and how do processes in the brain influence thought, emotion and behavior?  This course investigates these and similar questions by studying the science of the human mind and behavior. The course covers topics such as memory, perception, development, psychopathology, personality, and social behavior. A focus is on the biological, cognitive, and social/cultural roots that give rise to human experience. Additionally, the course will consider how behavior differs among people, and across situations.  Class size: 22

 

91960

PSY 141 B

 Intro to Psychological Science

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 201

SA

SSCI

See above. Class size: 22

 

92135

PSY 141 C

 Intro to Psychological Science

Thomas Hutcheon

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

HEG 102

SA

SSCI

See above.  Class size: 22

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91962

PSY 203

 Statistics for Psychology

Kristin Lane

  W  F     11:50-1:10 pm

RKC 103

MC

MATC

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of statistics and is aimed at helping the student to gain a fundamental understanding of the tools needed to understand and conduct research in psychology. Topics to be covered include frequency distributions and probability, descriptive statistics, simple correlation and regression, sampling distributions, t-tests and basic and factorial analysis of variance. Non-parametric tests such as Chi-square will also be introduced. The course will focus on the interpretation and communication of statistics, and we will work with the SPSS software package to analyze data.  This course is the first of a two-course sequence in statistics and research methods that is required of all prospective psychology majors. The course is ordinarily taken in the first semester of the sophomore year. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychological Science or its equivalent.   Class size: 34

PSY 203 Lab options (register separately)

 

91963

PSY 203 LBA

 Statistics for Psychology Lab

Kristin Lane

   Th       10:30-12:30 pm

HDR 101A

MC

MATC

Class size: 17

 

91964

PSY 203 LBB

 Statistics for Psychology Lab

Kristin Lane

   Th       1:30-3:30 pm

HDR 101A

MC

MATC

Class size: 17

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91965

PSY 210

 Adult Abnormal Psychology

Justin Dainer-Best

  W  F     1:30-2:50 pm

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

This course is designed to examine various forms of adult psychopathology (i.e., psychological disorders) within the contexts of theoretical conceptualizations, research, and treatment.  Potential causes of psychopathology, diagnostic classifications, and treatment applications will be addressed.  Adult forms of psychopathology that will receive the primary emphasis of study include the anxiety, mood, eating, and substance-related disorders.  Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the Cluster A requirement for the Psychology Major. Class size: 22

 

91966

PSY 224

 Child Development

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

 T  Th    8:30-9:50 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

This is a specialized course that prepares students to understand the biological, motor, perceptual, cognitive (including intelligence), language, emotional, social, and gender development of children. The process of human development from conception through early adolescence is studied. Emphasis is placed on what enables children to reach physical, mental, emotional and social maturity, and helps us to address the question “What environments promote optimum development for children?” Child development history, theory, and research strategies will be discussed, as well as the effect of family, peers, media, and schooling. This class would be good for those interested in children, education, or the cognitive and social development of humans. This class is not appropriate for students who have already taken Psych 216 (Developmental Psychology).  Class size: 22

 

91967

PSY 237

 Drugs & Human Behavior

Frank Scalzo

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 201

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior; Science, Technology, Society  This course will explore the biological bases for the behavioral effects of several psychoactive substances including therapeutic compounds, such as antipsychotics and antidepressants, and drugs of abuse.  The course will focus on mechanisms of drug action and physiological and behavioral effects.  Broader societal issues such as drug addiction, drug policies and drug testing, and controversial therapeutic interventions will be discussed in relation to selected compounds.  Prerequisite: An introductory Psychology or Biology course, or consent of the instructor.  Class size: 22

 

91969

PSY 341

 Predicting BEhavior: using linear regression analysis in psychological research

Thomas Hutcheon

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

HDR 106

SA

SSCI

One of the primary goals of the science of psychology is to understand and predict human behavior.  Linear regression is an important statistical tool in psychological research as it allows for the estimation of the relationship between two or more continuous variables and the translation of this relationship into prediction.  This seminar will serve as an introduction into the development, theory, and use of simple and multiple linear regression in the context of psychological research.  Topics will include data visualization, hypothesis testing, model selection, parameter estimation, and estimation of model fit.  Students will read and evaluate empirical articles that implement regression analyses across a range of psychological topics including applied cognitive psychology, clinical psychology, and behavioral economics.  Students will get hands-on experience conducting their own regression analyses on existing datasets using the R statistical program.  The course will culminate in a data collection project where students will apply regression techniques to answer a psychological question of their choosing.  This course is primarily intended for moderated psychology majors and moderated MBB students; non-psychology students are also welcome and may enroll with permission from the instructor.  Prior knowledge of the R statistical package is not required or expected.  Class size: 12

 

91968

PSY 391

 Psychobiology of Stress and Mental Illnes

Frank Scalzo

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 309

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior  Recent advances in the understanding of the neurobiology and physiology of stress have changed the way stress is viewed, both as a primary phenomenon and as a secondary factor that precipitates or causes a variety of psychiatric disorders. The latter include phobias, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and schizophrenia. This research conference will examine recent findings on the mechanisms and biological consequences of stress and will explore links between these effects and psychiatric disorders as reported in journal articles. Students will be expected to read and develop critiques of these articles as well as make class presentations.  This seminar is intended for students who have moderated in psychology or biology, but is open to students with suitable background.  Class size: 12

 

91973

PSY COG

 Cognitive Psychology:Advanced Methodology

Thomas Hutcheon

M           1:30-3:30 pm

PRE

 

 

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior  2 credits  In this course, students will gain experience working in a cognitive neuroscience laboratory. Using controlled experiments and brainwave recordings, we will investigate the cognitive processes that allow for the adaptive encoding, consolidation, retrieval, and forgetting of associative memories. Students will participate in all phases of the research process including experiment design, stimulus development, programming, data collection, analysis, and presentation. Enrollment is open to first-, second-, and third-year students with the permission of the instructor. Typically, this two-credit offering requires a two-semester commitment.   Class size: 6

 

91972

PSY DEV

Developmental Psychology: Advanced Methodology

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

   Th       1:30-3:30 pm

PRE 203

 

 

2 credits  In this course, students will participate in laboratory research in child developmental psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on 3- to 5-year olds' social cognition, perspective-taking, and memory in the context of games. The majority of time in this course will consist of independent laboratory work and research, and students will work with young children, parents, and members of the community to initiate research protocols in our Preston-based laboratory. There will be a weekly laboratory meeting, readings, assignments, two short papers (a literature review and a summary of your empirical project) and student presentations. Open to first-year, second-year and junior students with consent of the instructor. (This course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits). Class size: 6

 

91971

PSY NEU

 Neuroscience: Advanced Methodology

Frank Scalzo

 T           1:30-3:30 pm

HEG 200

 

 

(2 credits)  In this course, students will participate in laboratory research in developmental psychopharmacology, behavioral neuroscience, neuroanatomy and/or neurobehavioral teratology using the zebrafish as an animal model. Within these general fields, specific roles of neurotransmitter systems in normal behavioral development and the neurobehavioral effects of chemical insults during early development will be investigated.  The majority of time in this course will consist of independent laboratory work and research. There will be a weekly laboratory meeting, readings, assignments, two short papers (a literature review and a summary of your empirical project) and student presentations. Open to first-year, second-year and junior students with consent of the instructor (this course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits).   Class size: 8

 

91970

PSY SOC

 Social Psychology: Advanced Methodology

Kristin Lane

    F        1:30-3:30 pm

PRE 127

 

 

(2 credits)This course provides hands-on experience in the practice of Social Psychology. Students will work individually and in teams on ongoing research projects in the Social Psychology Laboratory. The realm of topics to be studied includes the roots of unconscious bias, the gender disparity in the sciences, and behavior change.  Students will participate in all phases of the research process, including developing stimuli, programming studies, conducting experimental sessions, and coding and analyzing research data. Requirements include attendance at weekly lab meetings, two papers, a lab presentation, and other assignments throughout the semester.  Enrollment is open to first-, second-, and third-year students with the permission of the instructor. Students are expected to enroll for two consecutive semesters. (This course may be taken for a maximum of eight credits.) Class size: 6