18106

PSY 121

 History and Systems in Psychology

Stuart Levine

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 101

SA

SSCI

Over the course of the semester we study theoretical insights and conceptual attempts to understand human behavior.  These are traced from the speculations within the Ancient World to current scientific thinking and methods guiding the study of psychology and other social science disciplines.  Importantly, because a discipline is also about people who advance it, students are introduced to the lives and times and ideas of individuals who have made significant contributions to the field.  Particular attention is given to such figures as James, Pavlov, Freud, Skinner and Asch, to mention just a few.  Illumination will also come from a consideration of correspondence between and among pivotal individuals in the field.  Critical analyses and integrations are juxtaposed with historical renderings.  Upper college students likely will benefit from this course because they already possess the foundational knowledge necessary to draw comparisons and critically evaluate varying points of view.  Lower college students likely will use the course to greet the intellectual domains they enter.  Class size: 22

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18104

PSY 128

 The Science of Behavior

Thomas Cain

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLINLC 115

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior  How does the mind create the reality we perceive? How do experiences shape the brain, and how do processes in the brain influence thought, emotion, and behavior? This course investigates these and similar questions by studying the science of the human mind and behavior. The course covers topics such as memory, perception, development, psychopathology, personality, and social behavior. We will focus on the biological, cognitive, and social/cultural roots that give rise to human experience, and consider how behavior differs among people, and across situations. Writing, speaking, group, and hands-on laboratory experiences will augment readings from the text, popular culture, and research journals. This course is not available to students who have already completed Psychology 141 (Introduction to Psychological Science).  Class size: 40

PSY 128 LAB OPTIONS: (register separately)

 

18105

PSY 128 LBA

 The Science of Behavior Lab

Thomas Cain

 T        1:30 pm-3:30 pm

HDR 101A

LS

SCI

Class size: 20

 

18107

PSY 128 LBB

 The Science of Behavior Lab

Thomas Cain

   Th    1:30 pm-3:30 pm

HDR 101A

LS

SCI

Class size: 20

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18108

PSY 141 A

 Intro to Psychological Science

Thomas Hutcheon

M  W   10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior  How does the mind create the reality we perceive? How do experiences shape the brain, and how do processes in the brain influence thought, emotion and behavior?  This course investigates these and similar questions by studying the science of the human mind and behavior. The course covers topics such as memory, perception, development, psychopathology, personality, and social behavior. A focus is on the biological, cognitive, and social/cultural roots that give rise to human experience. Additionally, the course will consider how behavior differs among people, and across situations. Class size: 22

 

18109

PSY 141 B

 Intro to Psychological Science

Thomas Hutcheon

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 203

SA

SSCI

See above. Class size: 22

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18110

PSY 204

 Research Methods in Psychology

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

                               

M  W  10:10 am-11:30 am

 

RKC 103

 

LS

SCI

This course provides an introduction to the research methods and data analyses used in the study of psychology. Students will gain an understanding of research methods and design through a combination of readings, lectures, class discussions, and hands-on laboratory experience.  Students will work both individually and in groups to design and conduct observational studies, surveys, and experiments.  There will be a strong emphasis on learning to present research results in different ways.  Ethical issues will be discussed at each stage of the research process, and students will develop their ability to assess research critically. This course has a choice of labs; students must register separately for a lab.  Prerequisite: PSY 203 or equivalent. 

Class size: 34

PSY 204 LAB OPTIONS: (register separately)

 

18564

PSY 204

 Research Methods in Psychology LAB A

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

M      1:30 pm   3:30 pm

 

HDR 101A

 

LS

SCI

Class size: 17

 

18565

PSY 204

 Research Methods in Psychology LAB B

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

    W     1:30 pm   3:30 pm

 

HDR 101A

 

LS

SCI

Class size: 17

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18111

PSY 220

 Social Psychology

Thomas Cain

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Sociology  Social Psychology is the scientific study of human thought, behavior, and feelings in their social contexts. This class will survey many of the processes that influence and are influenced by our interactions with others, such as attitude formation and change, conformity and persuasion. We will also use principles of social psychology to understand the ordinary origins of benevolent (e.g., altruism, helping behavior) and malevolent (e.g., aggression, prejudice) aspects of human behavior. Throughout the course, we will emphasize the influence of culture, race, and gender on the topics addressed. Students should have completed Introduction to Psychological Science or its equivalent. This course fulfills the Cluster B requirement for the Psychology Major.  Class size: 22

 

18112

PSY 231

 Neuroscience

Justin Hulbert

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 201

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior The ability to express thoughts and emotions, and to interact with the environment, is dependent in large part on the function of the nervous system. This course will examine basic concepts and methods in the study of brain, mind, and behavior. Topics include the structure and function of the central nervous system, brain development, learning and memory, emotion, sensory and motor systems, the assessment of human brain damage, and clinical disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychological Science, Foundations of Mind, Brain and Behavior, Introduction to Neurobiology, or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 22

 

18113

PSY 233

 Sensation and Perception

Thomas Hutcheon

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

As we read a line of text our eyes make a series of short, rapid movements (saccades) followed by brief pauses (fixations).  Yet, we experience reading as a continuous flow of information.  Reading reflects a fundamental question for the study of sensation and perception: how does our brain construct a stable representation of the world when provided with ever changing sensory information?  This course will begin to address this, and related questions, by studying the anatomy and physiology of sensory structures that receive stimulus information, with a particular emphasis on the visual and auditory systems.  Next, we will move to the cognitive processes that turn this raw sensory information into our perception of the world.  Finally, we will discuss how the same sensory information can often lead to very different perceptions across individuals and cultures.  Readings will consist of a combination of textbook chapters and empirical articles.  Prerequisite: PSY 141, CMSC 131 or permission of instructor.  Class size: 22

 

18115

PSY 335

 Science of Forgetting

Justin Hulbert

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 303

SA

SSCI

Forget something? Of course, we all have. From annoying tip-of-the-tongue moments to more embarrassing (or worse) memory lapses, forgetting is a regular and sometimes even advantageous occurrence. But we still have a lot learn about exactly how and why these episodes occur. In this seminar, we will consider leading psychological and neuroscientific theories of forgetting, as well as the empirical evidence for them. Do memories simply decay over time or is interference to blame? Can memories be repressed only later to be recovered? How do drugs, alcohol, and traumatic head injuries affect memory consolidation? By the end of the course, you will have acquired the scientific background necessary to address these questions in relation to forgetting in your own life, as well as notorious cases of memory failures in the public sphere. This course is open to moderated students who have completed at least one of the following prerequisites: Cognitive Psychology (PSY 230), Human Memory (PSY 243), Neuroscience (PSY 231), or with instructor's permission. Class size: 12

 

18033

PSY 348

the  Work and Legacy of Stanley Milgram

Stuart Levine

M         3:00 pm-6:00 pm

LB3 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Social Studies   It has now been more than fifty years since the original work of Stanley Milgram demonstrated the remarkable and very widely unpredicted and unexpected finding that large numbers of individuals in multiple samples of American men and women studied were willing to "punish" another person when ordered to do so by an experimenter; this in the stated but false context of a psychology experiment on learning and memory.  The prominence of the initial work and the continued salience of such study and accumulated findings in the domain of social psychology cannot be over-stated.   And it very much has not reached the stage of dormancy as the publication of studies, literature reviews and conferences on the topic of obedience to authority continue to appear in unabated fashion.  It is even the case that as recently as six years ago a replication of the original study, with  slight modifications, and with concordant results was published (J. Burger, January 2009).  Further revealing of prominence is that fact that a relatively new full-length movie version of the original study (a biopic) appeared this year.  In addition, a diligent search of current psychology or cross-disciplinary archives uncovers further studies that provide evidence that obedience and indeed destructive obedience is very much prevalent in our society and in many others as well and in a myriad of contexts.  The domain of the "Milgram study" is especially worthy of continuing interest.  This because of the vastness of both criticism and praise of the original work but also because of historical and significant events in the intervening years between 1960s and stretching to our current time.   The continuing study of obedience is vital for the betterment of institutions, even in a democratic society.  Social scientists should and must find a way to safely and ethically investigate the conditions that promote destructive obedience and thereby begin to learn the rudiments of how such can be minimized.  This is a college seminar.  It is not limited to psychology or social studies or for that matter majors in any particular discipline.  The two criteria for membership are a willingness to read with care and then with conviction share with others the results of such reading and study.  Over the course of the semester a sizable portion of the work contained in the body of the obedience literature is reviewed.  Admission by permission of the instructor. Class size: 10

 

18116

PSY 363

 wild chimpanzees: Social Behavior in an Evolutionary Context

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

 T        4:40 pm-7:00 pm

OLINLC 208

SA

SSCI

As our closest living phylogentic relative, chimpanzees are one of the best tools we have for understanding our own evolution. This course will explore the methods and findings of research devoted to chimpanzee natural social ecology, collected from the field over the past 60 years. What conditions and competencies give rise to complex social behavior, and how is this reflected in the physical body (and the physical environment)? We will augment our reading of literature on the complex behavior of non-human apes living in the wild with examples of studies reporting competencies of these animals living in captivity. This course is part of the Thinking Animals Initiative, an interdivisional collaboration among students and faculty to further the understanding of animals and human-animal relationships. Prerequisites: either Psych 141(Introduction to Psychological Science) or Bio 202 (Ecology & Evolution).

Class size: 12

 

18117

PSY COG

 Cognitive Psychology: Advanced Methodologies

Justin Hulbert

    F     12:30 pm-2:30 pm

PRE

 

 

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior  2 credits  In this course, students will gain experience working in a cognitive neuroscience laboratory. Using controlled experiments and brainwave recordings, we will investigate the cognitive processes that allow for the adaptive encoding, consolidation, retrieval, and forgetting of associative memories. Students will participate in all phases of the research process including experiment design, stimulus development, programming, data collection, analysis, and presentation. Enrollment is open to first-, second-, and third-year students with the permission of the instructor. Typically, this two-credit offering requires a two-semester commitment.   Class size: 6

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18507

HR 223

 Epidemiology from a Human Rights Perspective

Helen Epstein

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 103

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Anthropology; Biology; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies; Psychology

 

18114

MBB 317

 Mind, Brain & Behavior Seminar

Justin Hulbert

   Th    2:30 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 302

 

 

Cross-listed: Psychology  2 credits Students concentrating in Mind, Brain & Behavior are required to take this two-credit course for graduation. Each senior presents personal research in progress or significant material from the literature. Each junior presents an interesting paper of personal choice from the literature. The purpose of the seminar is to enhance communication among seniors about their research and to encourage juniors to become familiar with both the academic literature and research undertaken in the program, such as topics from cognitive psychology, neuroscience, computational modeling, philosophy of mind, linguistics, music cognition, and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: Moderated status or permission of the instructor.