18433

PS 104

 International Relations

Michelle Murray

M  W  8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights  (PS core course)  This course provides an introduction to competing theories about the structure, functioning and transformative potential of the international system.  Part 1 deals with the traditional problem of international life, maintaining order among relatively equal states in a condition of anarchy.  Part 2 calls the assumption of anarchy into question by looking at hierarchical power relationships in a variety of issue areas.  Part 3 addresses contemporary challenges to the state's authority and the problems of governing in an increasingly global community.  Throughout the course an effort will be made to illustrate the relevance of theoretical disagreements for the real world.  Students will be evaluated on their understanding of the assumptions and logics of competing theories as well as their ability to apply those theories to historical and contemporary global problems.  Class size: 22

 

18434

PS 105

 Comparative Politics

Omar Encarnacion

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int'l Studies (PS core course)   The basic intellectual premise of comparative politics is that we can better understand the politics of any country by privileging its internal norms, processes and institutions in a broad cross-national perspective.  This comparative "method" allows us to address some of the most fundamental questions in the study of politics, such as what makes democracy possible, how is political representation organized around the world, and why some nations are more successful than others at generating wealth and prosperity, while contributing to the building of theories about the nature and evolution of states, interest groups, civil society, and the dynamics of political processes such as revolution, modernization, and democratization. Class lectures and discussions will cover developed and developing states, as well as democratic and non- democratic ones Class size: 18

 

18437

PS 115

 Political Theory

Samantha Hill

M  W  10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 303

SA

SSCI

(PS core course) This course offers a survey of Western political thought. We will examine themes like justice, freedom, and equality by exploring the writings of thinkers stretching from Plato to Malcolm X. In each case, we will attend to the particular crises these theorists addressed in their work, like civil war, revolution, democracy, and capitalism. We'll also learn how authors used their concepts and ideas to address the problems of their day, and how we may draw on them in our own political struggles. Class size: 22

 

18529

PS 202

 radical Political thought

Samantha Hill

M  W  3:10 pm   4:30 pm

OLIN 202

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Human Rights  This course offers students an introduction to traditions of radical political theory, focusing on the themes of reason, critique, and power. Moving from the tradition of 19th century German critical thought through the birth of Poststructuralism and the 68' moment, this course traces the transformation of radical political thought from a theoretical discourse centered on Neo-Marxist critiques of social, political, and economic institutions to a form of politics centered on freedom, justice, and individualism. We begin the class with an examination of alienation, reification, and the call to revolutionary class-consciousness in the works of Marx and Luk√°cs. These concepts provide a theoretical foundation for the tradition of critical theory that emerged from the so-called Frankfurt School in the works of Marcuse, Horkheimer, Adorno, and Benjamin. Alongside these thinkers we will examine post-industrial society,  enlightenment reasoning, and critiques of power. Transitioning to the emergence of Poststructuralist thought, we will look at some of the conceptual differences between Adorno's/Horkheimer's and Foucault's critique/s of reason. Following the historical transformations of radical political thought, we will survey how these traditions emerged and gave birth to contemporary political theory in the works of Habermas and Butler.  Class size: 22

 

18435

PS 257

 Nations and Nationalism

Christopher McIntosh

M  W  10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 203

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course)  From Brexit to the election of Donald Trump to the rise of ethno-nationalist political parties across Europe and beyond, nationalism has taken center stage as a driving force in international political life.  For even the most casual observer of European and American politics, it is obvious that nationalism plays a foundational role in contemporary movements and ideologies.  It is important to note, however, that nationalism is not a recent phenomenon. Throughout the 20th century, nationalism remained a central animating factor of domestic and international politics.  It is the time where the concept of the nation-state replaced alternative political arrangements to become the dominant ordering principle in world politics.  With the end of the Cold War and the apparent rise in globalization, many anticipated an emerging conflict between nations and states a conflict that has manifested in a variety of ways.  Nationalism intersects and overlaps countless other areas of political, social, and cultural concern.  This class will explore the historical emergence of nations, their social and political construction, and the means by which they are produced and reproduced in political life.  We will investigate the intersection of nationalism and race, ethnicity, culture, gender, postcoloniality, and subjectivity through authors such as Du Bois, Anderson, Brubaker, Butler, Puar, and Rankine.   This course will be taught concurrently at Bard's international partner institutions. Students will benefit from collaboration with peers at these institutions, as well as have the opportunity to engage students from these institutions on the issues raised by the class. Class size: 22

 

18439

PS 273

 Diplomacy in International Politics

James Ketterer

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights  The course explores the history, complexity and changing nature of diplomacy and international development.  Students will gain an understanding of the basic goals, constraints and structures of diplomacy: diplomatic corps, embassies, consulates, aid missions, attaches, envoys and the use of non-traditional diplomats.  They will then examine the evolution of those components and contexts to include public diplomacy, cyber diplomacy, diplomacy in combat zones and the use of international development as a foreign policy tool.  Using selected diplomatic crises as case studies, students will analyze the roles played by different government agencies, militaries, international & regional organizations, the media, public interest groups, private foundations, contractors, commercial interests, educational institutions, and law enforcement officials. Students will explore how nations communicate with each other in the 21st century (formally and informally) and will use in-class simulations and videoconferences with students across the Bard international network to explore the roles played by different actors in addressing immediate crises and longer-term diplomatic issues.  This course will enhance students' understanding of international relations, foreign policy formulation and implementation, and diplomatic history.  Class size: 22

 

18436

PS 284

 American Protest: disobedience, dissent, & resignation

Samantha Hill

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

ASP 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Human Rights  What does it mean to engage in political protest? What motivates us to move into the public sphere of politics? How do we appear in public, and how does our sense of identity relate to our sense of self? This course strips down conventional notions of political protest within the American context to critically inquire after what motivates us to engage or disengage with politics. Today it seems that many social movements revolve around what we call identity politics, calling into question sex, gender, and race. If everything has become political, then is anything political? What does it mean to act from a moral center? What courage does it require? Key texts in this course will include: Paul Tillich's The Courage to Be, Erich Fromm's To Have or To Be, Hannah Arendt's chapter on "Action" from The Human Condition and essay "Civil Disobedience". We'll explore the practice of political resignation in Henry David Thoreau's Walden and essay "Civil Disobedience", Theodor Adorno's Lectures on Moral Philosophy (What it means to be an American-joiner), Emily Dickinson's poetry, Wendell Berry's "The Mad Farmer Liberation Front", and Sheldon S. Wolin on "Political Theory as Vocation" and invocation. We'll also look at the art of political dissent in Thomas Paine's Common Sense, MLK's letters, and the tradition of Conscientious Objection in American political history. This course is part of the Courage To Be College Seminar Series; students are required to attend three lectures in the  Courage to Be Lecture Series sponsored by the Hannah Arendt Center. Class size: 22

 

18440

PS 290

 Totalitarianism

Kevin Duong

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 304

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights  "Totalitarianism" is a conceptual lodestar of twentieth century politics. It is supposed to point to everything that contemporary American and European political culture is not terroristic, homogenous, authoritarian, ideologically manipulative, and unfree. At the same time, critics have used the concept to describe regimes as different as the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, Maoist China, ISIS, and occasionally even the US itself. What is totalitarianism? This class engages this question by introducing undergraduate students to the history and theory of totalitarianism. We will study specific cases especially Nazi Germany, Vichy France, and Mussolini's Italy alongside the theoretical frameworks scholars have used to understand these regimes. Students can expect to discuss themes such as religion and secularism, collaboration and resistance, the rise of human rights, and the role of historical memory in contemporary Europe.  Class size: 18

 

18441

PS 313

 RATIONALITY AND THE STATE:  Enlightenment to Climate Change

David Kettler

M         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 200

SA

SSCI

The course deals with competing theoretical designs aimed at ensuring that state policies attend to the findings of science in its policies on vital matters. Beginning with Francis Bacon and "the Enlightenment" in France (the Encyclopedists) and Scotland (Adam Smith and Adam Ferguson), the course will consider Karl Marx/Friedrich Engels and John Stuart Mill as representative 19th Century thinkers, and work through a number of twentieth century writers, including Walter Lippman, John Dewey, Karl Mannheim, and Charles Lindblom.  Students will write a paper on the state of the question in the 21st Century.  Class size: 12

 

18442

PS 324

 Critical Security Studies

Michelle Murray

M         1:30 pm  - 3:50  pm

OLINLC 208

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights Security is one of the foundational concepts in the study of international politics. As the principal rationale for war, the quest for security influences both states' behavior in the international system as well as the structure of state and society relations in domestic politics. Too often, however, the meaning of security is taken for granted in the study of international relations, with individuals, societies and states homogenized into one coherent model that focuses exclusively on the threat, use and control of military force.  This seminar will interrogate this narrow concept of security by engaging with a diverse literature in international relations termed "critical security studies."  The critical security studies research agenda aims to denaturalize the common understandings of security that dominate the field of international relations and in doing so shows how security is socially constructed through specific and historically contingent political practices, which create shared social understandings and endow subjects with identities and interests.  Some of the broad theoretical themes covered include how threats to security are defined and represented, gendered and feminist approaches to security, the emergence and effects of dominant discourses of security and the politics of threat construction.  We will then apply the insights of the critical security studies approach to the contemporary security environment in the United States through a critical examination of the war on terrorism.  The course ends with a discussion of the ethics of national security by looking at the politics of torture, human rights and the suspension of civil liberties in the state of exception. Class size: 15

 

18443

PS 330

 Global Crisis of Democracy

Omar Encarnacion

M         4:40 pm-7:00 pm

OLIN 301

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights  In this seminar we will examine what is ailing democracy around the world, after decades of relentless expansion.  We begin with an exploration of the so-called third wave of democratization, the wave of democratic transitions which brought democracy to some three-dozen nations between 1974 and 1992 in Western Europe, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and Asia and Africa, taking note of such domestic and external developments as the postwar economic boom, the rise of the international human rights regime, and the advent of globalization. In the second part of the seminar we will examine the uneven legacy of the third wave, especially the rise of illiberal democracy in Latin America, creeping authoritarianism across the post-Communist world, and the failure of democracy to reach the Middle East, and the cultural, economic and political factors contributing to these outcomes--from persistent poverty and inequality, to the rise of radical Islam, to uneven support for democracy by the US and the international community. We conclude by examining the challenges to democracy in the developed West, especially the rise of Trumpism in the U.S., and what this might mean for the so-called liberal international order. Signaled by the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international financial institutions such as the World Bank and the IMF, this order is usually credited with making the world safe for democracy in the postwar era.  Class size: 15

 

18444

PS 363

 Ethics & International Affairs

Christopher McIntosh

 T        10:10 am-12:30 pm

HEG 300

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights  Current debates in US foreign policy have centered on questions surrounding drone strikes, civilian casualties, the targeted killing of Americans, and humanitarian intervention with advocates on both sides of these issues citing moral and ethical justifications for their respective positions.  Each of these debates beg a central question what does it mean to be ethical in international politics? To whom are we responsible? Do ethical concerns cross borders? What does it mean to be ethical in an arena defined by the modern sovereign state? This class will explore the underlying issues and tensions informing these questions by engaging the theoretical traditions and larger ethical conflicts underlying these policy questions.  Theories/issues to be covered include cosmopolitanism, just war, and post-structural approaches to international obligation.   After working through the larger questions theoretically, we will examine and apply these to contemporary debates surrounding intervention, terrorism, targeted killing, and torture.  Class size: 15

 

18438

PS 377

 Grand Strategy: from Sun Tzu to Clausewitz

Malia Du Mont

Walter Mead

   Th    1:30 pm-3:50 pm

RKC 200

SA

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Global & Int'l Studies, Human Rights   The question of what war is and how wars can be won has exercised great minds from the dawn of recorded history.  In this advanced seminar, students will explore classic texts on conflict from ancient China to modern Europe.  The class will examine the nature of conflict, the role of chance in human affairs, the definition of power and the development of strategic thought.  Students will be expected to produce a significant research paper.  Class size: 18

 

18445

PS 378

 The American Presidency

Bill Dixon

M         10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 310

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Historical Studies  This course examines the political and historical development of the US presidency from the founding until the present day. The course is divided into three parts.  In the first part of the course, we explore the emergence of the modern presidency as the central institution of the American political system.  In addition to the founding, we will give special attention to the Jeffersonian, Jacksonian, and Progressive Eras as well as the expansion of executive power under FDR.  Throughout this first part of the course we will also examine how the presidency developed various powers beyond the formal constitutional responsibilities of the office, including party leadership, control of the executive branch, and relations with the public. In the second part of the course, we will critically explore the operation of the modern presidency from FDR to the present. In particular, we will see how modern presidents contend with multiple, and, at times, conflicting roles and responsibilities (party leader, chief executive, commander in chief, media celebrity, world leader) in an increasingly complex political environment. In the third part of the course, we will consider the problem of contemporary presidential power.  In particular, we will ask whether presidential power is enlarged or diminished in the present era of hyper-partisanship, intensified media culture, economic and ecological volatility, and the shifting geopolitical environment confronting the United States. We will also ask what role presidential power and leadership should play in the life of contemporary American democracy. We will consider these questions in light of the Trump presidency and the 2016 election.  Class size: 18

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18385

ECON 203

 Game Theory

Aniruddha Mitra

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

ALBEE 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

18446

GIS 102

 Global & Int'l Studies:Climate

Michelle Murray

 T        4:40 pm-7:00 pm

RKC 103

SA

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Political Studies

 

18404

HIST 240

 20th C. Diplomatic History

Sean McMeekin

M  W  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 103

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

18407

HIST 2118

 Soviet Russia, 1917-1991

Sean McMeekin

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

RKC 102

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies; Russian

 

18410

HIST 2308

 China's Environment/Hist Persp

Robert Culp

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 203

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

18509

HR 218

 Free Speech

Roger Berkowitz

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

ALBEE 106

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Political Studies

 

18101

IDEA 130

 Chernobyl: Man-made Disaster

Matthew Deady

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

   W     10:10 am-12:10 pm

HEG 201

HEG 107

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Natural Science; Political Studies

6 credits 

 

18528

IDEA 215

 OF Utopias

Kevin Duong

Olga Touloumi

 T Th   10:10am-12:30pm

HEG 204

AA

SA

AART

SSCI

Cross-listed: Art History, Environmental & Urban Studies, Experimental Humanities, Political Studies

6 credits  This class explores the theory and practice of utopia from an interdisciplinary perspective. Utopias have always been imagined through a variety of mediums like the manifesto, the blueprint, and visual and performing arts. The course investigates the manifold scales of utopian articulation and realization, from tiny communities to project designing the entire globe. Combining the history of political thought and architectural history, the class will use the concept of utopia to map out the ways that men and women have sought to transform the spatial, psychic, and social landscapes they inhabited. What can we learn from the utopian imperative? What is the shape of utopia? How should we understand the relationship between thought and practice, hope and disappointment, idealism and realism? Projects presented range from early industrial colonies, socialist utopias, Christian communities, and anarchist utopias to settlement housing, shopping malls, and factories. The projects will be discussed in conjunction with major texts by Sir Thomas More, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Karl Marx, Robert Owen, Louis Marin, to name a few. Apart from regular writing assignments, students will engage with creative designs, building toward a final exhibition of design projects for future utopias. The course will include a field trip to Shaker's Village.  Class size: 22

 

18426

PHIL 254

 Popular Sovereignty in  Theory  and Practice

Thomas Bartscherer

M  W  6:20 pm-7:40 pm

HEG 308

MBV

HUM

 

Cross-listed: Political Studies