19367

PS 104

 International Relations

Michelle Murray

M  W      8:30-9:50 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights  This course provides an introduction to competing theories about the structure, functioning and transformative potential of the international system.  Part 1 deals with the traditional problem of international life, maintaining order among relatively equal states in a condition of anarchy.  Part 2 calls the assumption of anarchy into question by looking at hierarchical power relationships in a variety of issue areas.  Part 3 addresses contemporary challenges to the state’s authority and the problems of governing in an increasingly global community.  Throughout the course an effort will be made to illustrate the relevance of theoretical disagreements for the real world.  Students will be evaluated on their understanding of the assumptions and logics of competing theories as well as their ability to apply those theories to historical and contemporary global problems.  Class size: 22

 

19368

PS 109

 Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 308

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Sociology  The term Political Economy refers to the interrelationship between politics and economics. However, political scientists and economists do not always use the term in the same sense. Even within these two disciplines the term has multiple meanings. The course will review the ideas of a few major thinkers such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Karl Polanyi, Thorstein Veblen, John Maynard Keynes, and John Kenneth Galbraith, and will introduce students to two subfields in particular: international political economy and the political economy of development. Among the questions we would ask are: Why are some countries rich and others poor? What is development? What are the prime movers of globalization? Is the US an empire given its influence and power in the global economy? How can development be redefined to tackle the challenge of climate change? Among issues that we will look at closely is the role of organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization in managing the global economy and the current debates about reforming these institutions.  Class size: 18

 

19369

PS 115

 Political Theory

Kevin Duong

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 201

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

This course offers a survey of Western political thought. We will examine themes like justice, freedom, and equality by exploring the writings of thinkers stretching from Plato to Malcolm X. In each case, we will attend to the particular crises these theorists addressed in their work, like civil war, revolution, democracy, and capitalism. We'll also learn how authors used their concepts and ideas to address the problems of their day, and how we may draw on them in our own political struggles.  Class size: 22

 

19370

PS 122

 American Politics: Issues and  Institutions

Simon Gilhooley

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

HEG 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies  This course introduces students to the basic institutions and processes of American government. The class is meant to provide students with a grasp of the fundamental dynamics of American politics and the skills to be an effective participant in and critic of the political process. During the semester, we will examine how the government works, interpret current political developments and debates, and consider how to influence the government at various levels.  Class size: 22

 

19371

PS 212

 North Africa and the US:

case studies in foreign policy challenges

James Ketterer

M           11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 307

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Middle Eastern Studies  1 credit, to be taught in the first half of the semester.  North Africa as a region is understudied in the US and often neglected by US policymakers until dramatic events require immediate attention.  This course examines five different policy challenges the US has faced, thereby highlighting key overall aspects in the history, formulation and implementation of American foreign policy and exploring specific aspects of the US relationship with the countries across North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Egypt).  For a variety of historical reasons Egypt is not usually included in this regional grouping but is included here to offer the full complement of countries across the region.  Its inclusion also allows for a presentation of one case that is a traditional bulwark of US policy. The full set of cases covered by the course includes: Morocco - human rights versus monarchical stability; Algeria - Islamist revolt and the implications of US ambiguity; Tunisia - Hopes for change and US indifference; Libya - regime change and ensuing chaos; and, Egypt - American misreadings and missed opportunities following the revolution. Readings will include US government documents, policy analyses and scholarly articles. Students will engage in simulations and meet with guest lecturers who have been or are currently in policymaking positions. Class size: 18

 

19372

PS 240

 The Courage to Judge

Samantha Hill

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 203

MBV

HUM

If we are in a world, as many fear, where truth no longer matters and cultural criticism is dictated by Internet mobs, how are we to judge?

With the phenomenal appearance of totalitarianism in the middle of the 20th century, Hannah Arendt famously argued that the traditional moral categories of good and bad have lost their relevance. The inability to discern fact from fiction, and make critical judgments paves the ground for the emergence of fascist propaganda and rhetoric. So, how do we preserve and nurture our ability to make judgments? This course will examine the political concept of judgment and the way it has evolved within the western tradition of political theory. Primarily examining the works of Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Nietzsche, Hannah Arendt, and Theodor Adorno we will ask: What does it mean to judge in the world today?  This course is a part of the Courage to Be program.

Class size: 22

 

19375

PS 273

 Diplomacy and International Politics: Arab-Israeli Conflict Resolution efforts, 1948-2018

Frederic Hof

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

Barringer House 104

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights   This course explores the history, complexity and changing nature of diplomacy. Students will gain an understanding of the goals, constraints, and structures of diplomacy: diplomatic corps, embassies, consulates, envoys, and non-traditional diplomats. They will then examine the evolution of these components as new diplomatic tools have appeared: public diplomacy, cyber diplomacy; expeditionary (combat zone) diplomacy, and track II diplomacy. Using case studies drawn from seventy years of national, multi-national, and international diplomatic efforts to mitigate and ultimately end the Arab-Israeli conflict, students will be exposed to the application of real world diplomacy under the most complex, contentious, and difficult circumstances. This course will enhance students’ understanding of international relations, foreign policy formulation and implementation, the history of diplomacy, diplomatic tradecraft, and the multigenerational diplomatic efforts to end Arab-Israeli conflict. Class size: 22

 

19544

PS 275

 (Super) heroic politics

Elizabeth Barringer

  T  Th        4:40 pn – 6:00 pm

 OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Heroes have been a constant feature of Western culture stretching back to classical times. Yet their role in political orders is complex, varied, and dynamic—and frequently not aligned with the common good, or with democratic conceptions of politics. Our task in this course is to look at recent superhero movies as a continuation of this long tradition of heroic politics and to critically examine their potential for (or against) democratic practices: what kinds of political relationships do these stories imagine or support? Do superheroes function as good ethical and political role models that empower audiences? Or are they disempowering, teaching audiences to trust in the strengths of exceptional individuals (or exceptional states) instead of their own capacities? Can these stories teach us to be better citizens or are heroic narratives dangerous? To address these questions, this class will consider a selection of recent super-hero films alongside works of political theory, analyzing questions of democratic agency, courage, and state power. Among others, we will read works by Arendt, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Schmitt, and Plato; films such as Wonder Woman, Black Panther, and The Avengers will also be assigned. This course is part of the Courage to Be Seminar Series and students will be required to attend 3 Monday evening lectures associated with the series.  Class size: 20

 

19376

PS 280

 Nations, States, AND Nationalism

Sanjib Baruah

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 305

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies  The twentieth century was the century of nationalism and the century when the nation-state as a form of political organization became universalized. But the difficulties with the idealized model of the nation-state are quite apparent for all to see.  For instance, various forms of ethno-national mobilization--based on solidarities both larger and smaller than the nation-state—have challenged official state nationalisms.  The twenty first century opened with talk of moving beyond the nation-state. But at that time in certain parts of the world multi-national political spaces were getting reorganized along national lines.  This was also when failing and collapsed states became top foreign policy concerns of major powers, and a new form of international regimes of intervention came into being.  The course will examine the idea of the nation -- its historical and contemporary competitors -- the emergence of the nation-state system, and the challenges confronting this system.  Our approach will be comparative and we will draw on the experiences of all world regions.   Interested students should email Prof. Baruah prior to registration (baruah@bard.edu) with a short statement of why they would like to take this class.  Class size: 15

 

19465

PS 314

 Political EconOMY  of Development

Sanjib Baruah

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights  The study of economic development of the “Third World” has gone through several intellectual phases. The first generation of scholars viewed the process somewhat optimistically as the global extension of modernity. Neo-Marxist critics tried to locate Third World underdevelopment in the history of colonialism and in the persistence of structures of dependency of Third World countries.   “Post-development” theorists took on the idea of development itself.   Globalization and the emergence of a new international division of labor, has reframed the debates. Developing countries like Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico and South Africa are now members of the G-20 group of countries, which many see as a likely successor to the G8 group of leading industrial economies.  After reading representative authors of competing theoretical traditions, we will move on to concrete cases. This segment will be shaped partly by student interest. The course is meant as an Upper College seminar for students with some prior background in issues of development (through  PS 222: Political Economy, or other courses).  Research papers and class presentations are among the requirements.  Class size: 10

 

19466

PS 326

 Nuclear Proliferation

Michelle Murray

M           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 307

SA

SSCI

In January 2018 the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists moved its iconic Doomsday Clock to two minutes to midnight, reflecting the group’s “grim assessment” that in the current political moment the danger of a nuclear catastrophe is as high as it was during the height of the Cold War.  Indeed, with the possibility of nuclear war on the Korean peninsula, the emergence of a new nuclear arms race between the United States and Russia and the appearance of new nuclear powers, the proliferation of nuclear weapons has become an increasingly urgent threat to global security.  This seminar will critically examine the problem of nuclear proliferation. Topics addressed include:  How does the nuclear nonproliferation regime incentivize and discourage the pursuit of nuclear weapons?  Why are some states' nuclear arsenals considered instruments of international security whereas others’ nuclear ambitions are the source of instability in the system?  Why are only some of the insecurities generated by the existence and proliferation of nuclear weapons conceptualized as threats to national security?  How has the development and proliferation of nuclear weapons shaped the ways we understand what constitutes national security in the first place?  Is global zero, a world without nuclear weapons, possible?  In answering these questions we will consider nuclear proliferation as a material, social and cultural phenomenon that structures the international and domestic spheres and with this in mind develop an informed view of the various policy tools available to manage the spread of nuclear weapons.  This course is reading intensive and students will complete a significant research paper related to the themes of the course.  Class size: 15

 

19509

PS 330

 the global crisis of democracy

Omar Encarnacion

  Th     10:10 am – 12:30 pm

OLIN 310

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights This seminar examines why, after decades of relentless global expansion, democracy is facing mounting challenges and outright reversals.  We begin with an exploration of the so-called “third wave of democratization,” the explosion of democratic transitions which brought democracy to some three-dozen nations between 1974 and 1992.  It was capped by the collapse of Communism, an event heralded in some quarters as signaling “the end of history.”  This section capitalizes upon a wide range of post-war theories of democratization, such as transitology, modernization, post-materialism, social capital, and diffusion.  We will then examine the uneven legacy of the spread of democracy across Latin America, post-Communist Russia and Eastern Europe, and the Arab World, and the factors contributing to this legacy--from persistent poverty and inequality, to the rise of illiberal political cultures, to tepid support by the international community.  We conclude by examining the challenges to democracy in the developed West, especially the rise of right-wing populism across Western Europe and in the U.S.  With permission from the instructor, this class can be taken as a pre-moderation requirement in lieu of Introduction to Comparative Politics.  Class size: 15

 

19462

PS 347

 American Foreign Policy TraditION

Walter Mead

Malia DuMont

   Th       1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 305

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Historical Studies  This overview of American foreign policy, offers students a chronological and thematic overview of American foreign policy through the Age of Trump. The course examines the rise of a distinctive American foreign policy tradition marked by contentious democratic debate and the participation of many different voices and viewpoints in the formation and discussion of American foreign policy. Students will see how foreign policy and domestic politics have been closely linked throughout American history and understand the ideological and interest based politics that shaped the American foreign policy process over time. In addition to Professor Mead’s Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World, students will study works by realist scholars such as James Chace and George Kennan. Students will review the national security strategy statements of the Obama and Trump administrations to gain insight into the ideological differences between the two presidencies. The course instructors are both practitioners who will share their real world experiences and perspectives with members of the class.  Class size: 15

 

19463

PS 356

 THE Individual & American DemocracY

Simon Gilhooley

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 305

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies  Since its formation as the United States and even before, this country has been associated with the idea of the Individual. At the same time, the assumption that the People govern the United States has informed political life. Balancing the interests of the one against the many has therefore emerged as an important theme within American political thought. Writers and political thinkers engaging with American politics have sometimes extolled the virtues of the individual and sought to protect the individual from the “threat” of the masses; at other times the individual has been presented by commentators as a threat to the People’s authority. This course seeks to examine the ways in which the concept of the individual has informed thinking about American Democracy and vice-versa, each appearing at different times as an assumption of, an aim for, and a threat to the other. Authors engaged will include Crevecoeur, de Tocqueville, William Graham Sumner, the Abolitionists, F.A. Hayek, Emma Goldman, and Du Bois

Class size: 15

 

19464

PS 367

 Afro-Modern Political Thought

Kevin Duong

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

HEG 300

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies Among the traditions of modern political thought, there is none which theorizes freedom as convincingly as Afro-modern political theory. This advanced seminar is an intensive study of the meaning of freedom in Black political thought and intellectual history. Students can expect to read both classic works as well as contemporary social criticism. Particular attention will be paid to W. E. B. Du Bois, his critics, and his relation to other black intellectuals at home and abroad. Our goal will be to use Afro-modern political thought as a point of observation, the better to see the broader shape of twentieth century radical politics from the civil rights movement to communism and decolonization.

Class size: 15

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

19310

ECON 203

 Game Theory

Aniruddha Mitra

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLINLC 115

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

19344

HIST 301

 Rsch Techniques in History

Sean McMeekin

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 201

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

19344

HIST 301

 The Second World War

Sean McMeekin

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 201

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies