18093

PHYS 142 I

Introduction to Physics II

Paul Cadden-Zimansky

M W F 8:30 am-9:50 am

HEG 102

LS

SCI

Part II of a calculus-based survey which will focus on electricity and magnetism, light, electromagnetic radiation, and optics. The course stresses ideas - the unifying principles and characteristic models of physics. Labs develop the critical ability to elicit understanding of our physical world.Prerequisites:Physics 141, Mathematics 141.Class size: 24

 

18094

PHYS 142 II

Introduction to Physics II

Antonios Kontos

M W F 10:10 am-11:30 am

HEG 102

LS

SCI

See above. Class size: 24

PHYS 142 LAB OPTIONS: (register separately)

 

18095

PHYS 142 LBA

Introduction to Physics II Lab

Paul Cadden-Zimansky

M††† †††† 1:00 pm-3:00 pm

HEG 107

LS

SCI

Class size: 12

 

18096

PHYS 142 LBB

Introduction to Physics II Lab

Antonios Kontos

M††† †††† 3:10 pm-5:10 pm

HEG 107

LS

SCI

Class size: 12

 

18097

PHYS 142 LBC

Introduction to Physics II Lab

Matthew Deady

T†† †††† 1:30 pm-3:30 pm

HEG 107

LS

SCI

Class size: 12

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18098

PHYS 222

Mathematical Methods II

Matthew Deady

M W F 8:30 am-9:50 am

HEG 106

MC

MATC

This is the second part of a two-part course series that introduces mathematical topics and techniques that are commonly encountered in the physical sciences, including complex numbers and analytic functions, Fourier series and orthogonal functions, standard types of partial differential equations, and special functions.Prerequisites: MATH 141 and 142, or the equivalent.Recommended: PHYS 221, Mathematical Methods I.Class size: 12

 

18099

PHYS 312

Electricity and Magnetism

Paul Cadden-Zimansky

TTh11:50 am-1:10 pm

††† F†††† 10:10 am-11:30 am

HEG 107

HEG 107

MC

MATC

Electrostatics, conductors, and dielectrics. Laplace's Equation and characteristic fields. Magnetostatics, magnetodynamics, and the magnetic properties of matter. Flow of charge and circuit theory. Maxwell's Equations and the energy/momentum transfer of electromagnetic radiation.Prerequisites: Physics 142; co-requisite either Physics 222,Mathematics 241, or Mathematics 312.†† Class size: 16

 

18100

PHYS 321

Quantum Mechanics

Antonios Kontos

M W F 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

HEG 106

MC

MATC

Quantum mechanics is our most successful scientific theory: spectacularly tested, technologically paramount, conceptually revolutionary.This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to this remarkable theory.We will begin by establishing the structure of quantum mechanics in the context of its simplest case, the so-called qubit.Simultaneously, we will refresh the mathematical apparatus required to formulate quantum mechanics.To explore some of quantum mechanicís most interesting phenomena, including contextuality, entanglement, and nonlocality, we will next study systems of qubits. After an interlude on the interpretation of quantum mechanics, we will consider a variety of applications of quantum mechanics: 1-dimensional systems, including the harmonic oscillator, 3-dimensional systems, including the hydrogen atom, and quantum statistical mechanics, including that of identical particles as well as scattering and perturbation theory.We will conclude by learning the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics.Time permitting, we will touch on such topics as decoherence and quantum computation. Prerequisites: Physics 241, and eitherPhysics 221,Mathematics213 or Mathematics 242.Class size: 16