A student choosing to major in music can develop a course of study intended to cultivate specific musical interests and abilities. Advisers in each music field may suggest the best academic plan for each student. Areas of focus include performance or composition in classical, jazz, or electronic music genres; western music research and history; music theory and analysis; and ethnomusicology. To fulfill requirements in a desired focus, students are suggested to take no fewer than six 200/300 level theory and history courses by the time of graduation. Additional requirements may include regular enrollment in one or more of the performance workshops, private lessons, composition workshops, or ensembles that are offered each semester. By the time of moderation, a student should ideally have completed half of their suggested course requirements. Students’ Moderation and Senior Projects should ideally reflect their expressed musical interests and goals, whether they are based in performance, composition, research, analysis, or any combination of these. The Moderation Project for a student focused on composition or performance usually consists of a 25-40 minute recital, highlighting original work and/or other repertoire. For students interested in music scholarship or analysis, a substantial music history or theory paper serves as an appropriate moderation project. A Senior Project in music can be accomplished in a variety of ways. Performers and composers usually present two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each. For some composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by The Orchestra Now. In certain circumstances, a finished, sophisticatedly produced recording or multimedia project serves in place of a live performance. Music History and Theory students typically present an advanced, scholarly research or analysis paper as the main component of a Senior Project.

 

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble, one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

 

19238

MUS 104

 Bard College CommunITY Orchestra

Erica Kiesewetter

Zachary Schwartzman

M           7:30-10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PA

PART

2 credits  Auditions for new members will be on Monday, February 4, 2019, Olin Hall.  Please contact Greg Armbruster at garmbrus@bard.edu" regarding auditions. The first rehearsal is on Monday, February 11, 2019, Olin Hall.

 

19225

MUS 105

 Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

 T           7:30-10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PA

PART

1 credit First rehearsal will be Tuesday, February 5th at 7:30 m in Olin Hall.  Class size: 35

 

19234

MUS 106

 Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

    TBA

 

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 16

 

19269

MUS 108 CV

 Samba Ensemble

Carlos Valdez

    F        12:00-2:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

1 credit Samba Ensemble provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggae). Class size: 30

 

19257

MUS 108 MS

 Electroacoustic Ensemble

Matthew Sargent

M           6:41-8:00 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 15

 

19261

MUS 108 PS

 Mixed Trios / Quartets / Quintets

Patricia Spencer

    TBA

  TBA

PA

PART

1 credit Mixing winds and strings in an ensemble offers special challenges (such as matching tonguing and bowing) as well as unique colors, and taps into an wealth of repertoire. Choices for flute and strings include classics by Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn, strong works by more recent composers (Amy Beach, Alberto Ginastera, and others) and contemporary giants such as John Harbison, Thea Musgrave and Nicholas Maw.  Choices for clarinet or oboe or bassoon and strings likewise include a wide range:  Mozart, Danzi, Brahms, Joan Tower, Shulamit Ran, and many, many more. The ensemble will meet twice a week, once with the professor and once independently. Class meetings are arranged according to the schedules of those who sign up.

Class size: 6

 

19262

MUS 108 PS2

 Ensemble for Any Instruments

Patricia Spencer

 T           7:30-9:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

1 credit The large variety of works written “for any instruments” invites exploration of atypical groupings – flute, marimba and tuba have been known to project wonderful blends.  This repertoire often requires a high degree of responsibility on the part of the performer: not only choosing dynamics and tempos but also instrumentation of various phrases and sometimes overall structure.  Members of this ensemble will engage in musical thinking outside the bounds of “normal” chamber music, and will discover how (or if) that may open a new dimension in their approach to more conventional performance.

The ensemble will meet twice a week, once with the professor and once independently.

Repertoire under consideration:

Frederic Rzewski, Attica [or Les moutons de Panurge]

Arnold Schoenberg, Canon for Thomas Mann, and other canons

Judith Shatin, Grito del Corazón

John Cage, Living Room Music

Kurt Schwitters, Ursonate (selection)

Stefan Wolpe, Selections from “Music for Any Instruments”

Kenneth Amis, Interludes I - V

Class size: 6

 

19226

MUS 108D

 Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

 T  Th    4:40-6:40 pm

BITO CPS

PA

PART

2 credits Auditions will be by appointment.  Class size: 25

 

19286

MUS 108F

 Community Jazz Orchestra

Thurman Barker

M           7:00-9:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 15

 

19264

MUS 108H I

 Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Nyoman Suadin

M           5:00-7:00 pm

OLIN GREEN ROOM

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 20

 

19265

MUS 108H II

 Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan II

Nyoman Suadin

M           7:01-9:00 pm

OLIN GREEN ROOM

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 20

 

19285

MUS 108J

 Percussion Ensemble

Thurman Barker

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 12

 

19242

MUS 108N

 Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

M           4:40-6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composers’ works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting.  Class size: 10

 

19229

MUS 108P

 Bard Baroque Ensemble

Alexander Bonus

 T           10:00-12:00 pm

BLM 117

PA

PART

1 credit Performance ensemble focusing on music from 1550-1750. Instrumentalists and vocalists are welcome to audition.  Class size: 12

 

19245

MUS 108R

 Bard Georgian Choir

Carl Linich

   Th       4:40-7:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

1 credit The Bard Georgian Choir is an all-vocal group that studies and performs traditional polyphonic songs from the Republic of Georgia (former USSR). Most songs are taught orally, and no previous singing experience or music reading skills are required. Special vocal techniques are also explored, including ornamented singing and yodeling. The group performs concerts at the end of each semester. Carl Linich, the choir’s director, has been a scholar, teacher and acclaimed performer of Georgian polyphonic singing since 1990, and is a founding member of Trio Kavkasia. A basic ability to match pitch is required. Please contact the instructor directly: clinch@bard.edu to arrange auditions.  Class size: 30

 

 

MUSIC COURSES

 

19251

MUS 122

 Introduction to Music Theory

Isabelle O'Connell

  W         1:30-2:50 pm

 Th         10:10-11:30 am

BLM HALL

BLM N211

PA

PART

This course will serve as an introduction to reading, studying, and analyzing tonal music. Introduction to Music Theory is geared toward non-music majors as well as potential music majors who have had little or no exposure to reading music. We will begin with the basics of musical notation, progressing to the identification of scales, triads, and seventh chords.  (This course does not count towards the theory requirement for the music program.  Class size: 20

 

19255

MUS 139

 Intro to Electronic Music

Matthew Sargent

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

BLM N119

PA

PART

This hands-on course will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog tools and processes. Students will be introduced to foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on signal processing, studio and field recording, and modes of diffusion, including multichannel installation and live performance, and instruction in digital audio workstation software (Logic Pro, Pro Tools, and others). Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring contemporary approaches to electronic music software and technology. Enrollment in the course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios.  Class size: 20

 

19258

MUS 146

 Jazz Histories OF Sound AND CommunICATION

Whitney Slaten

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

BLM N211

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies  Jazz history is plural. It begins as histories of expressions by African descendants in the New World, as well as how their sounds and social positions have both attracted and resisted the participation of allies and oppressors in the construction of jazz as American culture. Histories such as these foreground assertions of jazz as both an American sound and the sound of something broader. The various lifeworlds of jazz—local and global, past and present—lead to questions about the music’s folk, popular, and art music categorization. Through a framework of exploring the history of jazz through specific sounds and surrogate communications, this course surveys the development of musical aesthetics set within specific social contexts that reveal how improvisation wields the production and reception of sounds and communications within and beyond the bandstand. Students in the survey course will read, present, and discuss writing about jazz and its periods. Lectures will situate specific media examples of performances across folk, popular, and art contexts, in ways that also foreground the significance of individual and group agency. Examples of race, gender, class, nationality, generation, and their intersections in jazz music will be the focus of the final research paper assignment. Class size: 20

 

19287

MUS 172

 Jazz Harmony II

John Esposito

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

BLM N211

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the jazz language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors.  Class size: 22

 

19800

MUS 202

 Music Theory / Ear Training

Alexander Bonus

David Sytkowski

M T W Th                1:30-2:50 pm

BLM N217

PA

PART

Continuation of Music Theory I, introduction to harmony, various seventh chords, secondary dominants, basics of modulation, four-part writing and voice-leading.  End result: ability to write a hymn, song or brief movement of tonal music.  Theoretical work will be complemented by ear-training classes focused on the singing and recognition of harmonies, score-reading and rhythmic studies. Prerequisite: Music Theory I or equivalent (knowledge of scales and keys).  This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. ( *Note: course will meet 4 days weekly, two days cover theory, 2 days cover ear-training.)  Class size: 20

 

19283

MUS 212

 Jazz in Literature II

Thurman Barker

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

BLM N210

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies  We will study Gary Giddens’ book Visions in Jazz and Robert Gottlieb’s Reading Jazz in order to bring attention to some important literature on Jazz. Some of the writers look beyond Jazz as an art form, but also bring attention to its historical influence on culture, race, tradition, and our social experience, as well as connecting with writers like Albert Murry, Ralph Ellison, Eudora Welty. There is an attempt in their works to illuminate the significance of the musical potential the musicians inherit and the creative options they exercise. This course includes the words of many who have been hailed as Jazz’s greatest musicians.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 22

 

19241

MUS 213

 Sounds of a World in Uproar

Peter Laki

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

BLM HALL

AA

AART

Nineteen-sixty-eight was a year of world-wide student protests, wars and assassinations.  It was also a banner year in music, in classical, jazz and rock alike.  By focusing on a single year (allowing for a few side glances a couple of years ahead and back), we will attempt a time travel fifty years into the past, and place the music in a broad historical, political and artistic context.  Ranging from Stockhausen and Ligeti to the Beatles and Rolling Stones and beyond, the class will seek to transcend conventional boundaries of genre.  There will be a number of reading and listening assignments the whole class will be required to complete, but students will be expected to identify and pursue individual areas of interest for term papers and class presentations. 

Class size: 20

 

19541

MUS 228

 renaissance counterpoint

Kyle Gann

 T  Th    3:10 pm – 4:30 pm

BLM N217

AA

AART

The ancient musical technique of counterpoint seems of questionable relevance today.  And yet, its premise- that human attention is riveted when a unified impression is created via maximum variety- is a fertile psychological principle relevant to many fields.  Overall, this course will follow classical species counterpoint as outlined by the eminent Knud Jeppesen, based on the style of Palestrina.  However, we will also examine the freer styles of earlier composers such as Josquin and Ockeghem, and generalize from contrapuntal concepts to such derivatives as the dissonant counterpoint of Charles Seeger and others.  The ability to read music, and basic knowledge of musical terminology (intervals, cadences) are prerequisites.  This fulfills a theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 20

 

19259

MUS 247

 Ethnography: Music & Sound

Whitney Slaten

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

BLM N210

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Anthropology; Experimental Humanities  How have recent ethnomusicologists and anthropologists written about traditional and popular musics around the world? How does this writing respond to representing culture, locally and globally? How does this writing about musics’ social contexts respond to changing academic attitudes within the humanities and social sciences, as well as the interdisciplinary development of sound studies? Students will read, present, and discuss chapters from recent book length examples of musical ethnography. Lectures and discussions will focus on the writing strategies of ethnographers, continually assessing how writing represents and analyzes local and global practices of production, circulation, and consumption, as well as how such works participate in emergent scholarly traditions. The course will culminate in a written comparative ethnography analysis paper in which students will compare two ethnographic monographs.  Class size: 20

 

19267

MUS 252

 Electronic Music Composition

Richard Teitelbaum

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM 117

PA

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing, original work in the form of recordings, scores, and/or digital realizations. These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members. Installation and inter-media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Lucier, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills a music theory requirement.  Class size: 15

 

19247

MUS 257

 Production & Reproduction

Thomas Mark

   Th       1:30-3:50 pm

BLM 117

PA

PART

This course will focus on the theory and practice of sound recording. Students will learn the use of recording equipment including digital tape recorders, mixing consoles, signal processing devices, and microphones. A/B listening tests will be used to compare types of microphones, microphone placement and many different recording techniques. ProTools software will be available for digital editing and mastering to CD. Assigned projects will include both multitrack and direct to stereo recordings of studio and concert performances. Class size: 12

 

19530

MUS 265

 literature and language of music: romantic music

Christopher Gibbs

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

BLM N217

AA

AART

This course will examine a limited number of exemplary composers and works in different genres from the nineteenth century, ranging from Beethoven to Mahler. Discussions will focus on the style and structure of individual pieces, as well as on issues of biographical, cultural, and historical context in which the music was created and received. The course counts toward the music history requirement for majors and conservatory students. It is not necessary to be able to read music to take the course.    Class size: 20

 

19289

MUS 266C

 Jazz Repertory II: BEBOP Masters

John Esposito

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the jazz language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors.  Class size: 22

 

19288

MUS 266D

 Jazz Repertory II: John Coltrane

John Esposito

 T           9:10-11:50 am

BLM N211

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  An immersion in the music of a Jazz master; includes readings, recorded music and films.  Coltrane’s music will be performed in a workshop setting by students and instructor.  Visiting artists will play and discuss the music. Prerequisites: Jazz Harmony II, or permission of Instructor. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 15

 

19260

MUS 269

 Sound Studies / Critical Listening

Whitney Slaten

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

BLM N210

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities  From the perspective of both ethnomusicology and the audio sciences of sound reproduction, this course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary work on sound studies. Throughout, it engages how specific critical listening techniques and features of sound studies discourses can be mutually informative for both musicians, sound artists, listeners, writers and cultural theorists who are interested in identifying the significance of musical or extramusical sounds within specific social contexts. Students will read, present, and discuss chapters and articles that each focus on singular keywords that are prominent within sound studies discourse. Lectures and demonstrations will juxtapose this terminology to a set of audio based ear training exercises that will develop students’ abilities to both hear and listen to the centers and peripheries of musical sounds and the evidence of related social life. Final projects for the course will take the form of an analysis that is informed by a blended critical listening and writing practice.  Class size: 20

 

19227

MUS 283

 High / Low: Tensions & Agreements in  20th and 21st century american music

James Bagwell

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

BLM N211

AA

AART

Musicologist H. Wiley Hitchcock described American music as often being caught between vernacular traditions (folk and popular idioms) and cultivated traditions (European-based classical music).  This seminar will examine the tensions and agreements between these two distinct traditions by investigating specific musical works that reflect these characteristics in both categories.  Each class meeting will focus on works composed in a separate decade in the both the 20th and 21st centuries.  Works to be studied will include music by Igor Stravinsky, Charles Ives, Miles Davis, Philip Glass, among others.  Evaluation will be based on several response papers and a major research project.  Class size: 20

 

19542

MUS 319

 19th century harmony

Kyle Gann

M   W     3:10 pm – 4:30 pm

BLM N217

AA

AART

The most important ongoing innovation in 19th-century music was in the field of harmony, and this course will trace that development in historical context. After starting with Field and Chopin, we will be weaving back and forth between the so-called “Music of the Future” – Berlioz, Liszt, Wagner, Bruckner, Mahler – and the “New German” composers – Mendelssohn, Robert and Clara Schumann, Brahms – ending at the dawn of the 20th-century with Scriabin, Debussy, and Schoenberg.  We will look at form and orchestration, but mostly we will be involved with Roman numeral analysis of augmented sixth chords, borrowed chords, enharmonic modulations, and chromatic voice-leading, applying Neo-Riemannian techniques where appropriate.  More compositionally, we will study the wealth of thematic transformation techniques that made late Romanticism such a fluid and often extramusically referential language. Primary grading points will be two analysis papers (10 pages each) and two composition projects, plus occasional smaller assignments, along with active participation in class analyses.  Class size: 15

 

19284

MUS 332

 Jazz: The Freedom Principle II

Thurman Barker

M           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N210

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies  This is a survey course in Jazz history, part II of a four-part sequence, which concentrates on Jazz from 1927 to 1942, the big band or swing era. Emphasis will be on band leaders such as Jimmie Lunceford, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, Teddy Wilson, Count Basie and Duke Ellington. This course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music from 1927 to 1942 and examine its effect on the music. This will be illustrated with recordings, films and videos. This class requires an oral presentation and critical listening.  Class size: 15

 

19266

MUS 340

 Introduction to Experimental Music

Richard Teitelbaum

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N119

PA

PART

This course deals with the experimental tradition starting from Henry Cowell’s radical innovations early in the 20th century, through those of his students, pre-eminently John Cage and others of the “California School” of the 30’s and 40’s, and “The New York School” around Cage that included Feldman, Brown, Wolf and Tudor in the 50’s. The primary focus however will be on the development of new forms, media and social organizations begun in the sixties and seventies, as exemplified by: text-based “event” pieces of the international Fluxus movement; the early minimalist works of La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich and Philip Glass; live electronic music of AMM in London, Musica Elettronica Viva in Rome and Sonic Arts Union in New York; the work of Cornelius Cardew and the Scratch Orchestra in London; and the influence of “open form” “free jazz” and “creative music” in establishing improvisationally-based compositional techniques and systems in the works of Anthony Braxton, George Lewis and others. In addition to studying the works this tradition has produced and discussing their aesthetic and philosophic underpinnings, students will be encouraged to realize and perform works by these composers, and to create new ones of their own.  Class size: 15

 

19256

MUS 346

 Topics in Music Software: MAX/MSP

Matthew Sargent

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N119

PA

PART

This course will focus on MAX/MSP, an object-oriented programming environment for real-time audio processing, computer-assisted composition, live laptop performance, musical interactivity, video generation, and more. Students will learn fundamental concepts of digital audio and computer programming while engaging in creative projects. We will explore examples of MAX programming utilized in contemporary music and sound art repertoire. The course will conclude with a final project. Introduction to Electronic Music is recommended as prerequisite. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 10

 

19243

MUS 370

 Chamber Jazz Composition Wksp.

Erica Lindsay

  W         6:00-9:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

This class is for students who have completed Jazz Composition I & II, as well as Jazz Arranging, or with the permission of the instructor. We will combine genres and instrumentations found in both jazz and classical orchestration, exploring the possibilities for melding traditional chamber instrumentation with that of the jazz ensemble. The focus will be on exploring ways to combine improvisation with thru composed material. There will be weekly writing assignments with a final project that will be performed and recorded at the end of the semester.  Class size: 15

 

19235

MUS PROJ LGR

 Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

    By arrangement with the professor.

 

PA

PART

Class size: 8

 

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS

Music Workshops carry two credits, unless otherwise noted.

 

19240

MUS WKSH EK

 UPPER String Practice & Technique Wkshop

Erica Kiesewetter

    F        4:00-5:30 pm

BITO 203

PA

PART

2 credits This class will explore a comprehensive collection of string left and right hand techniques, including string crossings, various strokes, vibrato and double-stops. We will explore a variety of practice techniques including self-recording and mental playing. This class is open to advanced violin (and viola) players in the college and conservatory.  Class size: 8

 

19399

MUS WKSH ES

 Moderation Performance Wkshop

Erika Switzer

    F        1:30-3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

1 credit  This workshop will support the preparation of moderation concerts in tandem with your advisor’s guidance. Skills will be developed in repertoire research, practice techniques, rehearsal leadership, program and program notes writing, venue logistics, and stagecraft. Each student will have the opportunity to present ideas about their programs in a roundtable format, opening up conversations about the process and the purpose of their projects. Segments of recital programs may also be presented in preparation for final performance. Open to all students preparing for moderation in music performance.  Class size: 15

 

19400

MUS WKSH ES2

 Senior Project Performance Workshop

Erika Switzer

    F        10:10-12:30 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

1 credit  This workshop will support the preparation of senior project concerts in tandem with your advisor’s guidance. Students will develop skills in repertoire research, practice techniques, rehearsal leadership, program and program notes writing, venue logistics, and stagecraft. Each student will have the opportunity to present ideas about their programs in a roundtable format, opening up conversations about the process and the purpose of their projects. Segments of recital programs may also be presented in preparation for final performance. Open to all students preparing for senior projects in music performance.  Class size: 15

 

19236

MUS WKSH GM

 Chamber Music Workshop

Marka Gustavsson

Erica Kiesewetter

Blair McMillen

Raman Ramakrishnan

              TBA

 

PA

PART

2 credits Coaching assignments and schedule will be determined TBD.  Class size: 12

 

19268

MUS WKSHA

 Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's musical soul onto the page, pass that page first to players in the class and then to Conservatory players as well as the College Players who record and play these pieces.  All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower (tower@bard,edu) prior to registration to determine eligibility. Class size: 6

 

19290

MUS WKSHA SB

 Workshop: Vocal Composition

Susan Botti

   Th       1:30-3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits Exploring the craft of composition through the creation of new vocal works and the study of existing contemporary vocal repertoire. Open to performers who are interested in composition as well as composers - reading music required. In addition to actualizing new and existing scores, we will utilize improvisation and find new ways to "capture" music on the page to communicate to performers.  Class size: 10

 

19249

MUS WKSHB

 Workshop: Performance Class

GRENOUILLÈRES: FRENCH ART SONG FROM CRADLE TO SWAMP.

Rufus Muller

M           4:40-7:00 pm

BITO CPS

PA

PART

2 credits  Song recitals can often be boring, or even alienating, as well as frightening for the performers!  In this class we explore ways to make the performance of art song moving and satisfying for performers and public alike.  For collaborative pianists as well as singers.  Class size: 15

 

19232

MUS WKSHD

 Sight Reading Workshop

Michael DeMicco

 T           12:00-1:00 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C (concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well. Class size: 14

 

19231

MUS WKSHL

 Workshop: Opera Workshop

Teresa Buchholz

Ilka LoMonaco

Rufus   Muller

  W         4:40-7:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

2 credits Part II of Opera Workshop which began In the Fall Semester. We prepare a themed program of operatic excerpts (choruses, ensembles, solos), which is performed in the Fisher Center, fully staged and with orchestra, in the early part of the Spring Semester. Typically this involves intensive rehearsals during the week before Spring Semester, and evening rehearsals in the first week of semester. Students enrolling in the Fall Semester for two credits thus commit themselves to the final rehearsals and performances in the Spring Semester, which earn them an additional two credits.  Enrollment is by audition.  Please contact one of the professors for details - their email addresses are:  Professor LoMonaco: Ilka98@aol.com, Professor Muller: rumu2000@earthlink.net, Professor Buchholz: buchmezzo@hotmail.com.  lass size: 20

 

19244

MUS WKSP3

 Workshop: Jazz Improvisation

Erica Lindsay

   Th       4:40-7:40 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

2 credits This class is an ensemble performance workshop focused on developing improvisational skills within the harmonic context of both jazz harmony and free improvisation. The goal is to develop facility in being able to improvise over harmonic structures from the blues to more free form styles of improvisation. Students are assigned to an ensemble that is appropriate to the level of their experience. Class size: 15

 

19253

MUS WKSP7

 Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

 T           4:00-7:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

2 credits The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class.

 

 

PRIVATE LESSONS   (register for lessons with a drop/add form.)

 

All students are eligible for private music instruction.  Lessons can be taken for either one or two credits or audited (no credit).

 In order to receive credit, the student must register the lessons with the Registrar's office and the student must be enrolled in a music ensemble, performance workshop or the equivalent, to be determined by the instructor.

The ensemble can be taken for credit or audited.  Students taking lessons for credit are assessed a nominal lab fee of $250. per semester by the college (approximately $20.83 per lesson x 12 lessons) whether it is 1 or 2 credits. Students receive a maximum of 12 lessons per semester.

 If private lessons are audited (no credit), a fee is mutually agreed upon by the student and the instructor and the student pays the instructor directly.

 Audited lessons will not appear in the student's registration or on the transcript.  If students are taking more than one lesson, the student must also be enrolled in another ensemble to receive the lesson rate of $250. per semester.  Registration for private lessons must be completed by the end of the add/drop period (February 6, 2019).

 

Kathryn Aldous – violin

Lera Auerbach - composition

Teresa Buchholz   classical voice

Ira Coleman - jazz bass

David Degge - percussion

Mike DiMicco - jazz guitar

Greg Dinger – classical guitar

Dani Dobkin-  Serge modular synthesizer

Akua Dixon – jazz cello

John Esposito – piano (jazz)

Greg Glassman - jazz trumpet

Marka Gustavsson -  violin, viola

Larry Ham -  jazz piano

Jessica Jones – saxophone (jazz)

Ryan Kamm - classical bass

Erica Kiesewetter   violin

Gwen Laster – jazz violin

Hsiao-Fang Lin - trombone

Erica Lindsay – saxophone (jazz)

Ilka LoMonaco- classical voice

Blair McMillen - piano

Rufus Müller   classical voice

Peter O'Brien - jazz drums

Isabelle O'Connell - piano

Pamela Pentony - voice (jazz)

Eric Person – jazz saxophone

Steve Raleigh -  jazz guitar

Raman Ramakrishnan - cello

Patricia Spencer -  flute

Erika Switzer -  classical piano

Francesca Tanksley – jazz piano

John Charles Thomas - trumpet (classical and jazz), French horn and didjeridu

Carlos Valdez - Latin jazz, hand percussion and drums

Bruce Williams - jazz and classical saxophone