A student choosing to major in music can develop a course of study intended to cultivate specific musical interests and abilities. Advisers in each music field may suggest the best academic plan for each student. Areas of focus include performance or composition in classical, jazz, or electronic music genres; western music research and history; music theory and analysis; and ethnomusicology. To fulfill requirements in a desired focus, students are suggested to take no fewer than six 200/300 level theory and history courses by the time of graduation. Additional requirements may include regular enrollment in one or more of the performance workshops, private lessons, composition workshops, or ensembles that are offered each semester. By the time of moderation, a student should ideally have completed half of their suggested course requirements. Students’ Moderation and Senior Projects should ideally reflect their expressed musical interests and goals, whether they are based in performance, composition, research, analysis, or any combination of these. The Moderation Project for a student focused on composition or performance usually consists of a 25-40 minute recital, highlighting original work and/or other repertoire. For students interested in music scholarship or analysis, a substantial music history or theory paper serves as an appropriate moderation project. A Senior Project in music can be accomplished in a variety of ways. Performers and composers usually present two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each. For some composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by The Orchestra Now. In certain circumstances, a finished, sophisticatedly produced recording or multimedia project serves in place of a live performance. Music History and Theory students typically present an advanced, scholarly research or analysis paper as the main component of a Senior Project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble, one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

 

91852

MUS 104

 Bard College COMMUNITY  Orchestra

Erica Kiesewetter

Zac  Schwartzman

M           7:30-10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PA

PART

2 credits  Auditions for new members will be on Monday, September 10, 2018, Olin Hall.  Please contact Greg Armbruster at garmbrus@bard.edu" regarding auditions. The first rehearsal is on Monday, September 17, 2018, Olin Hall.  Class size: 25

 

91828

MUS 105

 Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

 T           7:30-10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PA

PART

1 credit First rehearsal will be Tuesday, September 11 at 7:30 pm, Olin Hall.   Class size: 35

 

91848

MUS 106

 Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

    TBA

BLUM N104

PA

PART

Class size: 16

 

91880

MUS 108 CV

 Samba Ensemble

Carlos Valdez

    F        12:00-2:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

1 credit Samba Ensemble provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggai). Class size: 30

 

91867

MUS 108 MS

 Electroacoustic Ensemble

Matthew Sargent

M           6:41-8:00 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 15

 

91870

MUS 108 PS

 Mixed Trios, Quartets, and Quintets

Patricia Spencer

   To be arranged

 

PA

PART

1 credit Mixing winds and strings in an ensemble offers special challenges (such as matching tonguing and bowing) as well as unique colors, and taps into an wealth of repertoire. Choices for flute and strings include classics by Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn, strong works by more recent composers (Amy Beach, Alberto Ginastera, and others) and contemporary giants such as John Harbison, Thea Musgrave and Nicholas Maw.  Choices for clarinet or oboe or bassoon and strings likewise include a wide range:  Mozart, Danzi, Brahms, Joan Tower, Shulamit Ran, and many, many more. The ensemble will meet twice a week: once with the professor, and once independently at a time to be arranged by the ensemble members.  Class size: 6

 

91871

MUS 108 PS2

 Ensemble for Any Instruments

Patricia Spencer

 T           7:30-9:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

1 credit The large variety of works written “for any instruments” invites exploration of atypical groupings – flute, marimba and tuba have been known to project wonderful blends.  This repertoire often requires a high degree of responsibility on the part of the performer: not only choosing dynamics and tempos but also instrumentation of various phrases and sometimes overall structure.  Members of this ensemble will engage in musical thinking outside the bounds of “normal” chamber music, and will discover how (or if) that may open a new dimension in their approach to more conventional performance. The ensemble will meet twice a week: once with the professor, and once independently at a time to be arranged by the ensemble members.  

Repertoire under consideration:

Frederic Rzewski, Attica [or Les moutons de Panurge]

Arnold Schoenberg, Canon for Thomas Mann, and other canons

Christian Wolff, Snowdrop

Judith Shatin, Grito del Corazón

Kurt Schwitters, Ursonate (selection)

Stefan Wolpe, Selections from “Music for Any Instruments”

Class size: 6

 

91829

MUS 108D

 Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

 T  Th    4:40-6:40 pm

BITO CPS

PA

PART

2 credits Auditions will be Tuesday, September 4 at 4:40pm in Bito CPS.  Class size: 25

 

91834

MUS 108F

 Ensemble:Community Jazz Orchestra.

Thurman Barker

M           7:00-9:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 15

 

91874

MUS 108H I

 Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan I

Ketut Suadin

M           5:00-7:00 pm

OLIN GREEN ROOM

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 20

 

91875

MUS 108H II

 Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan II

Ketut Suadin

M           7:01-9:00 pm

OLIN GREEN ROOM

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 20

 

91833

MUS 108J

 Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

1 credit Class size: 15

 

91857

MUS 108N

 Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

M           4:40-6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composers’ works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting. Class size: 14

 

91836

MUS 108P

 Ensemble: Baroque

Alexander Bonus

 T           10:00-12:00 pm

BLM 117

 

PART

1 credit Performance ensemble focusing on music from 1550-1750. Instrumentalists and vocalists are welcome to audition.  Class size: 15   

 

91860

MUS 108R

 Bard Georgian Choir

Carl Linich

   Th       4:40-7:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

1 credit The Bard Georgian Choir is an all-vocal group that studies and performs traditional polyphonic songs from the Republic of Georgia (former USSR). Most songs are taught orally, and no previous singing experience or music reading skills are required. Special vocal techniques are also explored, including ornamented singing and yodeling. The group performs concerts at the end of each semester. Carl Linich, the choir’s director, has been a scholar, teacher and acclaimed performer of Georgian polyphonic singing since 1990, and is a founding member of Trio Kavkasia. A basic ability to match pitch is required. Please contact the instructor directly: clinch@bard.edu to arrange auditions. Class size: 30

 

 

 

MUSIC COURSES

 

91855

MUS 112

 Introduction to Music

Peter Laki

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 104

AA

AART

The orchestra is one of the most extraordinary musical organizations in the world.  The Western symphony orchestra can have as many as 100 members, with a well-defined hierarchy, well-established customs and conventions, rules and regulations.  The music written for orchestra—symphonies, concertos, tone poems, etc.—is an extremely diverse, colorful and exciting repertory, which animates large communities of music-lovers around the world.  This course will explore the institution of the orchestra, and the music written for it, through reading and—most importantly—through listening.  We will follow the concerts of the Bard Conservatory Orchestra, study the music they will be playing, attend their concerts and discuss them afterwards. Readings and listenings will be assigned on a weekly basis, through handouts, library reserves, and internet links.  There will be three short papers. Class size: 22

 

91850

MUS 169

 Listening to String Quartets

Marka Gustavsson

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 104

AA

AART

Many composers of string quartets reserved that particular genre for their most profound and unusual utterances. We will listen to the expressive, conversational music in this form, from its roots in the Classical First Viennese School, through German Romanticism, European Nationalism, the Second Viennese School, up to and including American and European Modernism. In addition to developing tools for listening to this complex polyphonic texture, through classroom experience with recordings, and attending concerts, we will read composers’ letters such as Beethoven’s Heiligenstadt testament, as well as articles from current publications including such authors as Alex Ross, Kyle Gann, Christopher Gibbs, and Richard Taruskin. Assignments will include two papers (5 pages), one concert review, informal writing in class, and a final project. Knowledge of music notation is not required.  This course does not fulfill a music history credit. Class size: 16

 

91842

MUS 171

 Jazz Harmony I

John Esposito

M  W      9:40-11:30 am

BLM N211

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  Introduces the basic harmonic structures that are components of the Blues and the Tin Pan Alley songs that modern Jazz musicians used as vehicles for improvisation. Basic keyboard skills are learned including transposition. The semester includes a short historical survey of Blues and of Jazz from Ragtime to the Swing era as part of the effort to understand the practice of the technical/aesthetic fundamentals specific to Jazz as a 20th-century African American music including an introduction to the contribution of female musicians to the Jazz legacy. There is an ear-training component to this course. The melodic component includes singing the basic 20th-century harmonic materials, Blues melodies and transcriptions of solos by Jazz masters. It includes the practice of the syncopated rhythmic language underlying linear melodic phrasing. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors. Required course for moderating into the Jazz program.   Class size: 22

 

92342

MUS 185

 INTRODUCTION TO ETHNOMUSICOLOGY

Whitney Slaten

  T  Th  10:10 am – 11:30 am

BLM N217

SA

SSCI

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of ethnomusicology, the study of music in and around its social and cultural contexts. Through our exploration of the materiality and meaning of music, we will listen to wide-ranging examples of sounds from around the globe. We will consider ways to listen deeply and to write critically about music. We will examine how music has been represented in the past and how it is variously represented today, and will develop ethnographic research and writing skills. We will ask questions about the utility and value of music as a commodity in our everyday lives and in our globalized world. We will debate the ethics of musical appropriations and collaborations. We will examine both the foundational questions of the discipline (addressing debates about musical authenticity, musical origins, universals, comparative frameworks, and the preservationist ethos) as well as recent subjects of ethnomusicological concern. Topics will include: media and technology; post-colonial issues; music and language; hybridity; circulation and consumption; music and labor; music and gender; and the relevance of music to contemporary indigenous politics and human rights.   Class size: 20

 

91835

MUS 201

 Music Theory / Ear Training

Alex Bonus / David Sytkowski

M T W Th                1:30-2:50 pm

BLM N217

PA

PART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This fulfills theory requirements.   Class size: 22

 

91866

MUS 209

 Gender & Sexuality in Italian Opera

Karen Raizen

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

BLM N210

AA

D+J

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Italian Studies Opera, at its birth in Italy, was a drama of identities: from lovers to mythological figures, comic to tragic archetypes, characters declared their identities through song. Gender and sexuality played a crucial role in these identities, and were often quite fluid: there were men playing women’s parts, women dressed as men, women dressed as men dressed as women, and countless plots and subplots with homoerotic overtones. This course explores the construction of gender and sexuality in early Italian opera, from the very first productions at the beginning of the seventeenth century through the end of the eighteenth century. We will focus on castrati—castrated male singers—as well as the complex characterization of women and female desire in various productions. Operas will include Claudio Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo, Francesco Cavalli’s La Calisto, George Frideric Handel’s Giulio Cesare, and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro. Through secondary readings from gender and queer theory, we will delve into the rich questions of subjectivity and identity in early opera.  Class size: 22

 

91856

MUS 210

 The Roaring Twenties

Peter Laki

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

BLM N211

AA

AART

This course will explore the music of the 1920s in New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna and Petrograd/Leningrad.  The emphasis will be placed on the relationships between composers and other artists and musical institutions in their historical and social context.  Among the issues explored will be the meaning of the term “avant-garde,” as well as interactions between various Western and non-Western art-forms.  No technical knowledge of music is necessary.  Among the composers studied will be Gershwin, Copland, Stravinsky, Milhaud, Weill, Schoenberg, Berg, and Shostakovich.  There will be an eclectic reading list, as well as some film screenings in the evening that will require attendance two or three times during the semester.  Students will write one term paper whose contents they will also present in class; in addition, there will be a mid-term quiz and a final exam.  It will count towards the music history requirement for music majors and Conservatory students.  Class size: 22

 

91831

MUS 211

 Jazz in Literature I

Thurman Barker

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

BLM N210

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies  This course presents some of the short stories and poems by Rudolph Fisher, Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, and Julio Cortazar. The texts used in this section is Hot and Cool by Marcela Briton and the Harlem Renaissance Reader, edited by David Lewis.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for the music program.  Class size: 22

 

91830

MUS 230

 Interaction between Music & Film: a historic overview

James Bagwell

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

BLM N211

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Film and Electronic Arts  This course will trace the use of music in film beginning with silent films in the early twentieth century through the present.  We will examine how music was incorporated into such films as Citizen Kane (Welles), Rapsodia Satanica (Oxilia), King Kong (Cooper), Black Orpheus (Camus) Singing in the Rain (Donen), On the Waterfront (Kazan), Forbidden Planet (Wilcox), A Woman is a Woman (Godard), 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick), Easy Rider (Hopper), and Pulp Fiction (Tarantino), among others.  While the main focus of the course will be historical, we will analyze specific techniques that composers and directors use to heighten storytelling through music.  Course projects will include three short scene analysis papers and one research paper due at the end of the term.  This course is open to both upper level music majors and non-majors and will satisfy a music history requirement for music majors.   Class size: 15

 

91869

MUS 240

 Introduction:Electronic Music

Matthew Sargent

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

BLM N119

PA

PART

This hands-on course will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog tools and processes. Students will be introduced to foundational practices in electro-acoustic sound production and their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on signal processing, studio and field recording, and modes of diffusion, including multichannel installation and live performance, and instruction in digital audio workstation software (Logic Pro, Pro Tools, and others). Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring contemporary approaches to electronic music software and technology. Enrollment in the course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. Class size: 20

 

92343

MUS 253

 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ETHNOMUSICOLOGY: LOUDSPEAKERS AS CULTURE

Whitney Slaten

 M  W     11:50 am – 1:10 pm

BLM N210

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities  How do loudspeakers construct musical culture? How does listening to loudspeakers reorganize social behavior? Critical organology, intersections of local and global influences, manufacturing and nationalism, cultural imperialism, strategies of resistance, generational change, race and bass, gender and power, digital technology, fidelity and loss as technological and cultural ideas, and ethnographic inquiry will be themes that organize the course. Students will understand the importance of loudspeakers from the perspectives of ethnomusicology, sound studies, and audio science. Class sessions will include experiments with audio transducers, as well as critical listening for the contributions of audio transducers in recorded and amplified music. Through weekly reading and writing assignments, short papers, and an ethnographic research paper, students will complete the course with a nuanced understanding of the relationship between music, technology, and culture.

 

92159

MUS 262

 TOPICS IN MUSIC SOFTWARE

Matthew Gantt

M  W   11:50 am – 1:10 pm

BLM N119

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities  In this course, students will learn how to integrate sound and music into interactive experiences, primarily using the Unity game engine and editor. Unity is a widely used tool in interactive media design, allowing users to publish stand-alone applications on multiple platforms, including desktop, mobile, web and virtual reality. Specific topics will include contrasting sample-based vs. procedural sound design, musical cues that adapt to user input, algorithmic or generative music, and techniques for designing convincing spatial audio. Students will also learn basic programming concepts, using easy-to-integrate scriptable behaviors in the C# language. This course is open to majors and non-majors. Students should have some previous classroom experience in electronic music (such as Introduction to Electronic Music), electronic arts, or computer science. 

Class size: 15

 

91844

MUS 266C

 Jazz Repertory: BEBOP Masters I

John Esposito

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  This course will include acquisition of the basic skills that make up the foundation of all jazz styles.  We will also study the jazz language from the BEBOP ERA up to the 60’s. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors. Class size: 22

 

91843

MUS 266D

 Jazz Repertory: John Coltrane

John Esposito

 T           9:30-11:45 am

BLM N211

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  An immersion in the music of a Jazz master; includes readings, recorded music and films.  Coltrane’s music will be performed in a workshop setting by students and instructor.  Visiting artists will play and discuss the music. Prerequisites: Jazz Harmony II, or permission of Instructor. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 22

 

92002

MUS 268

 Literature and Language of Music of the  20th  & 21st  Centuries

Peter Laki

 T  Th    11:50 am – 1:10 pm

BITO 210

AA

AART

This course is a survey of Western art music of the last 100 years.  Using the Oxford History of Western Music, College Edition, we will study some of the major trends and major composers of the era, including the most recent developments.  The emphasis will be on active, critical listening and discussion.  Parallel phenomena in literature and the visual arts will be explored as time permits.  There will be three short historical-analytical papers, a midterm and a final exam.  Supplementary readings, in addition to the textbook, may be assigned.  Class size: 20

 

91846

MUS 304

 Arithmetic of Listening

Kyle Gann

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

BLM N217

AA

AART

The human ear can distinguish about 250 pitches per octave; why do we satisfy ourselves with only twelve? This introduction to the mathematics of harmony and the history of tuning will ponder and explore that question. First we will study the development of scales and harmony from the ancient Greeks onward, through the tuning arguments of the 15th through 18th centuries, including the various meantone systems (such as Mozart’s 55-step octave) and temperaments that preceded the bland homogeneity prevalent today. In the second half we will explore modern experimental tunings, including quarter-tone music, 72-tone music, and the just intonation of Ben Johnston, La Monte Young, and other microtonal composers, plus pitch tendencies of Indian, Thai, Indonesian, and Arabic musics. The class will be graded on two exams, midterm and final projects (analysis, construction of new instruments, and/or performance or composition of microtonal works), occasional smaller assignments, and active class participation. We will read Harry Partch’s Genesis of a Music, and a textbook by the professor will be provided. Basic ability to read music is recommended, though it may be compensated for by a background in mathematics or acoustics. This course represents either a theory or history requirement for music majors. 

Class size: 22

 

91878

MUS 326

 History of Electronic Music

Richard Teitelbaum

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N119

AA

AART

In the 1920’s, a number of new electronic instruments such as the Theremin, the Ondes Martenot, and the Trautonium were invented, and a number of composers, including Hindemith and Messiaen, composed new works for them.  After the invention of magnetic recording tape in the late 40’s electronic music became an enterprise that was produced in special studios and fixed on tape for later playback. Starting around 1960, John Cage and David Tudor began experimental performances with such works as Cartridge Music (1960), Variations II and other pieces that reintroduced the live performer to the electronic medium.  Many composers, such as Mumma, Behrman, Lucier, Ashley, Stockhausen, Nono, and Boulez, as well as collective improvisationally-based groups such as AMM Music in London, and Musica Elettronica Viva in Rome soon followed suit.  During the 60’s and 70’s, with the advent of smaller and the more personal synthesizers invented by Moog, Buchla and others, the field of live electronic music became a practical reality. Some ten years later, a similar sequence of events took place with regard to computer music, where the large mainframes of the 50’s and 60’s were superseded by the PC revolution of the late 70’s and 80’s.  This was followed by the more recent development of the laptop that has enabled performers to carry powerful, portable computers on stage. This course will trace these developments, examine the literature of the field, encourage live performances of “classic” pieces, and the creation and performance of new compositions and improvisations. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken in conjunction with Electro-Acoustic Ensemble.  This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 15

 

91837

MUS 329

 MONSTERS! MADNESS! MAYHEM!:

The Wild Side of Baroque Music

Alexander Bonus

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

BLM N217

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities Music from the Baroque era is full of wild things -- Furious gods; enraged lovers; clashing armies; hideous villains; and chaotic storms, just to name a few. This course explores a rich variety of French, German and Italian compositions that embrace these more volatile and violent aspects of Baroque culture. Particular emphasis is placed on the mythological origins and literary inspirations for these musical works. Each week, students will synthesize diverse materials and contribute to class discussions by offering analyses and opinions on reading and listening assignments. A final project consists of a well-researched paper and class presentation, which gives each student an opportunity to explore other “wild” Baroque compositions or composers not addressed in weekly lectures or discussions. Class size: 14

 

91832

MUS 331

 Jazz: The Freedom Principle I

Thurman Barker

M           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N210

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies A jazz study of the cross-pollination between Post-Bop in the late fifties and Free Jazz. The course, which employs a cultural approach, is also designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music to examine its effects on the music from 1958 to the mid-sixties. Emphasis will be on artists and composers such as Cecil Taylor, Ornette Coleman, Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Max Roach, Eric Dolphy, Charles Mingus, and Horace Silver. Illustrated with recordings, films, and videos.  Class size: 15   This course counts towards the music history requirement for the music program.  Class size: 15

 

91868

MUS 352

 ELECTRONIC, Electroacoustic  AND COMPUTER Composition

Matthew Sargent

M           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM N119

PA

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled. The course will serve as a workshop environment for student work: participants will be expected to regularly present and discuss their ongoing compositional projects. These will be examined by the instructor and other class members. Students may also take on collaborative works, installations, and intermedia projects. Analyses and class presentations of contemporary electroacoustic repertoire will also be expected of the students during the semester. This fulfills a music theory requirement. Class size: 15

 

91858

MUS 356

 Arranging Techniques: Jazz - ACCELERATED

Erica Lindsay

  W         6:00-9:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

This class will focus on the various techniques used in jazz ensemble writing from trio to large ensembles. Classic drop-two voicings and tertiary approaches will be covered as well as more contemporary cluster, quartal and line part writing. The various approaches to textural issues that arise in each particular instrumentation will be examined as well as various approaches to section writing. Final projects ranging from Sextet to Big Band will be either recorded or performed live at the end of the semester. This is an advanced seminar class for moderated music majors. Prerequisite are Jazz Composition I and II or the permission of the instructor.  Class size: 10

 

91845

MUS 359

 Analysis of 20th CENTURY Modernist Music

Kyle Gann

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

BLM N217

AA

AART

Analysis of the formative works of 20th-century modernism is a primary basis of musical creativity today. Unlike that of earlier eras, 20th-century music is highly contextual, and no particular method of analysis will apply to every example; techniques helpful for earlier music, particularly Roman Numeral analysis, will rarely be of use here. Instead we will learn to deduce what kind of analysis is appropriate by looking for both small- and large-scale patterns. In some cases (Bartok’s Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta; Stockhausen’s Gruppen; Babbitt’s All Set; Crawford’s String Quartet), an appropriate method of analysis can be applied from what we know of the composer's pre-compositional ideas; in others (Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du Printemps; Satie’s Socrate; Ives’s Concord Sonata; Feldman’s Rothko Chapel), the method of composition is more intuitive or even improvisatory, and we may need to be content with descriptive analysis. The course will be graded on class participation – everyone is expected to be able to contribute vocally in class by bringing up analytical insights gained as they study the works independently - and on two musical analysis papers. This course fulfills a theory requirement for music majors. Prerequisite: Theory 1 and 2 or the equivalent.  Class size: 15

 

91847

MUS PROJ

 Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

    By arrangement              -

BLUM N104

PA

PART

See Prof. Garcia- Renart. Class size: 8

 

 

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS

Workshops carry 2 credits, unless otherwise noted.

 

92662

MUS WKSH LA

 THE ART OF INTERPRETATION

Lera Auerbach

    F        1:30 pm – 3:50 pm

BLUM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits The “Art of Interpretation” will provide a creative environment designed to offer a broad palate of personal tools to succeed in real-world scenarios to instrumentalists, singers, composers, and conductors. The course will provide opportunities for students to try out their current repertoire and receive constructive feedback on interpretative issues. Through live performances and interactions with composers and interpreters from among fellow students and the faculty, the course will bring fresh eyes to the music score and to music notation. Experiencing mutual perspectives and different points of view will enrich the understanding and effectiveness of interpretation. Learning to see the score through the composer’s eyes will give participants a deeper understanding of the composer’s choices in both standard and contemporary repertoire, leading to more insightful interpretations and to finding your artistic voice while conquering possible fears and limitations. Additionally, the course will give students experience and a set of skills to deal with real-life challenges such as the pressures of auditioning, stage nerves, rehearsal and practicing techniques, instrumentalists/singers/conductors/composers’ psychology, and perspectives of collaboration. Evaluation and grading will be based on participation, including student’s discussions and performances.

Class size: 15

 

91853

MUS WKSH EK

 AdvANCED Orchestral Audition Preparation Workship

Erica Kiesewetter

    F        4:00-6:00 pm

BITO 202

PA

PART

2 credits This class is for advanced violinists (and any orchestral instrumentalist) who would like to learn orchestral excerpts for festival and orchestra auditions. The student is expected to prepare 3-5 excerpts in the semester, play in class most weeks, and participate in feedback. The class will involve detailed coaching on the excerpts including a focus on understanding the work in context and the composer's style, advice on preparation and performance anxiety and mock audition practice. Final is a mock audition with 3-5 excerpts. Class size: 8

 

91849

MUS WKSH G/M

 Sonata & Chamber Workshop

Marka Gustavsson

Blair McMillen

    TBA

 

PA

PART

2 credits This workshop explores a wide range of chamber music repertoire from duo sonatas to larger ensembles. Students are encouraged to sign up as a pre-formed group, or be placed by audition. Groups should plan to rehearse together every week prior to their coaching with faculty. Schedule tbd. Open to college and conservatory students. Class size: 12

 

91879

MUS WKSHA

 Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M           1:30-3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's musical soul onto the page, pass that page first to players in the class and then to Conservatory players as well as the College Players who record and play these pieces.  All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower (tower@bard,edu) prior to registration to determine eligibility. Class size: 8

 

91863

MUS WKSHB

 Workshop: Performance Class – “wherE the bee sucks” texts by shakespeare set to song

Rufus Muller

M           4:40-7:00 pm

BITO CPS

PA

PART

2 credits Song recitals can often be boring, or even alienating.  In this class we explore ways to make the performance of art song moving and satisfying for performer and public alike.  For collaborative pianists as well as singers.  Class size: 15

 

91840

MUS WKSHD

 Sight Reading Workshop

Michael DeMicco

 T           12:00-1:00 pm

BLM HALL

PA

PART

2 credits This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well. Class size: 14

 

91839

MUS WKSHL

 Workshop: Opera Workshop

Teresa Buchholz

Rufus Muller

Ilka LoMonaco

  W         4:40-7:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

2 credits In the Fall Semester we prepare a themed program of operatic excerpts (choruses, ensembles, solos), which is performed in the Fisher Center, fully staged and with orchestra, in the early part of the Spring Semester. Typically this involves intensive rehearsals during the week before Spring Semester, and evening rehearsals in the first week of semester. Students enrolling in the Fall Semester for two credits thus commit themselves to the final rehearsals and performances in the Spring Semester, which earn them an additional two credits.  Enrollment is by audition. Please contact Professors Müller (rumu2000@earthlink.net) and LoMonaco (ilka98@aol.com) for details.  Class size: 16

 

91873

MUS WKSHN

 "Hands-on" Music History

Patricia Spencer

Peter Laki

 T           5:00-7:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

2 credits Members of this class will explore our musical past by playing it!  Also improving sight reading, the course will cover a sampling of chamber music

from different eras.  Members will build familiarity with a wide variety of harmonies and musical styles (mostly European) from the Renaissance through

the present.  Background readings and class discussion about the composers will provide historical context for the works being played. Parts and scores

will be provided one week in advance for those who prefer to prepare their sight-reading.  Composers may include but are not limited to: Gesualdo,

Machaut, di Lasso, Monteverdi, Purcell, Frederick the Great, J.S. Bach and his sons, Vivaldi, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Dvorak,

Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Ravel, Copland, Cage, Carter, Rzewski and many more. Works will not be rehearsed to a performance level, but may occasionally be repeated.  Class size: 15

 

91859

MUS WKSP3

 Workshop: Jazz Improvisation

Erica Lindsay

   Th       4:40-7:40 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

2 credits This class is an ensemble performance workshop focused on developing improvisational skills within the harmonic context of both jazz harmony and free improvisation. The goal is to develop facility in being able to improvise over harmonic structures from the blues to more free form styles of improvisation. Students are assigned to an ensemble that is appropriate to the level of their experience. Class size: 15

 

91865

MUS WKSP7

 Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

 T           4:00-7:00 pm

BLM N211

PA

PART

2 credits The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class.

 

91876

MUS WKSPR

 Vocal Collaboration for Pianists

Erika Switzer

    F        11:00-1:00 pm

BITO CPS

PA

PART

2 credits Open to pianists of the College and Conservatory programs, this course introduces students to vocal collaboration.  With the assistance of guest singers and conductors, students will have the opportunity to study and play music from the operatic, oratorio and song repertoires.  Skills in listening, poetic interpretation, and coaching will be developed.  This course prepares students to join Bard’s Opera Workshop as rehearsal pianists and to partner undergraduate vocal majors in moderation and senior project recitals.  It also counts for chamber music credit for Conservatory pianists. Class size: 8

 

 

 

PRIVATE LESSONS   (register for lessons with a drop/add form.)

All students are eligible for private music instruction. Lessons can be taken for either one or two credits or audited (no credit). In order to receive credit, the student must be registered with the Registrar's office. Registration for private lessons must be completed by the end of the add/drop period (Sept. 12th).

When lessons are taken for credit, the student must also be enrolled in a music ensemble or the equivalent, to be determined by the instructor. The ensemble can be taken for credit or audited. Students taking lessons for credit are assessed a nominal lab fee of $250. per semester by the college (approximately $20.83 per lesson x 12 lessons) whether it is 1 or 2 credits. Students receive 12 lessons per semester. If private lessons are audited (no credit), a fee is mutually agreed upon by the student and the instructor. Audited lessons will not appear in the student's registration or on the transcript. If students are taking more than one lesson the student must be enrolled in another ensemble to receive the lesson rate of $250. per semester.

 

Ø   

Ø  Kathryn Aldous - violin

Ø  David Arner - piano (jazz, classical and improvisation)

Ø  Teresa Buchholz   classical voice

Ø  Ira Coleman - jazz bass

Ø  David Degge - percussion

Ø  Mike DiMicco - jazz guitar

Ø  Greg Dinger – classical guitar

Ø  Dani Dobkin-  Serge modular synthesizer

Ø  Akua Dixon – jazz cello

Ø  John Esposito – piano (jazz)

Ø  Greg Glassman - jazz trumpet

Ø  Marka Gustavsson -  violin, viola

Ø  Larry Ham -  jazz piano

Ø  Jessica Jones – saxophone (jazz)

Ø  Ryan Kamm - classical bass

Ø  Erica Kiesewetter   violin

Ø  Gwen Laster – jazz violin

Ø  Hsiao-Fang Lin - trombone

Ø  Teresa Lin – oboe

Ø  Erica Lindsay – saxophone (jazz)

Ø  Ilka LoMonaco- classical voice

Ø  Blair McMillen - piano

Ø  Rufus Müller   classical voice

Ø  Peter O'Brien - jazz drums

Ø  Isabelle O'Connell - piano

Ø  Pamela Pentony - voice (jazz)

Ø  Steve Raleigh -  jazz guitar

Ø  Raman Ramakrishnan - cello

Ø  Patricia Spencer -  flute

Ø  Erika Switzer -  classical piano

Ø  Francesca Tanksley – jazz piano

Ø  John Charles Thomas - trumpet (classical and jazz), French horn and didjeridu

Ø  Viktor Toth - clarinet

Ø  Carlos Valdez - Latin jazz, hand percussion and drums

Ø  Bruce Williams - jazz and classical saxophone

Ø  James Zimmerman - tuba

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

92066

RUS 327

 Russian Opera:History/Myths

Marina Kostalevsky

M           3:30-5:50 pm

OLIN 309

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Music