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Bard Learning Commons courses: (no distribution credit)

 

19110

BLC 150

 Algebra Workshop

Daniel Newsome

    F        1:30 pm – 2:50 pm

OLIN 310

(2 credits) This course provides a review of the algebra used in math, science, and social science courses. It is designed for students who would like to improve their algebra skills while taking or in preparation to take an introductory math, science, economics or statistics course. Topics include linear equations and their graphs, quadratic equations, fractions, rational expressions, and exponents. This course will be graded Pass/Fail. No distributional credit is earned.   Class size: 22

 

19111

BLC 190

 Algebra, Trigonometry, & Functions

Daniel Newsome

   T         5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

OLIN 310

(2 credits) This course is designed for students who have taken a pre-calculus course in high school or at Bard, but would like more computational practice with algebra, trigonometry, logarithms and exponentials. This course can be taken at the same time as a math, science, or economics course, or in preparation to take such a course in a subsequent semester. This course will be graded Pass/Fail. No distributional credit is earned.  This course will meet for the first 10 weeks of the semester.  Class size: 22

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19062

MATH 102

 Elementary Statistics

Jules Albertini

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

HEG 102

MC

MATC

The main focus of this course is to introduce core ideas in statistics that are needed to make sense of what is found in media outlets, online surveys, and scientific journals. Most concepts are introduced in a case-study fashion; statistical software will be used to analyze data and facilitate classroom discussions. The goal of this course is to foster statistical reasoning, and to assist in making informed conclusions about topics involving data. Intended for non-math majors.  Prerequisites: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic.  Class size: 22

 

19539

MATH 103

 QUADRIVIUM: MATHEMATICS AND METAPHYSICS IN THE PREMODERN WORLD

Daniel Newsome

  T   Th       8:30am – 9:50 am

HEG 102

MC

MATC

What does the Music of the Spheres sound like? What influence did astrology have on mathematics?  Why does Newton's rainbow (ROYGBIV) have 7 colors? Does mathematics exist if there is nobody to think about it? These questions are addressed by the quadrivium, a term coined by the 6th century philosopher Boethius for the mathematical program of the medieval university. The quadrivial disciplines make up 4 of the 7 Liberal Arts: arithmetic, music, geometry and astronomy.  Taken as a whole the quadrivium is the metaphysics of Pythagoras and Plato.  Number is the structure of the universe and One-ness is its source. This course will explore each of the quadrivial disciplines using primary sources in English translation and show how mathematics was seen as the structure of everything.  Primary authors will include Plato, Euclid, Ptolemy, Boethius, Martianus Capella, al Khwarizmi, Sacrobosco, Fibonacci, Oresme, Alberti, Cardano, and Kepler.  Other than a working knowledge of basic algebra, the class requires only a willingness to explore new ideas and construct convincing arguments. Prerequisite: Passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic. Class size22

 

19063

MATH 105

 TIME, SPACE, AND INFINITY: MathEMATICAL PERSPECTIVES ON PHILOSOPHICAL PARADOXES

Steven Simon

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

HEG 204

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Philosophy If time is composed of moments with zero duration, is change an illusion? Beginning with Zeno’s ancient paradoxes, fundamental problems on the nature of time and space – and intimately related ones regarding infinity – have bedeviled thinkers through the contemporary period. This course will provide a beginner-friendly tour of some of mathematics’ most profound discoveries (irrational numbers, limits, uncountability) and the concerns (e.g., how can there be the “same” amount of whole numbers as there are fractions, yet “fewer” fractions than real numbers?) which arise in answering such intractable questions. Other than a working knowledge of basic algebra, the class requires only a willingness to explore new ideas and construct convincing arguments. Prerequisite: Passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic.  Class size: 22

 

19064

MATH 110

 Precalculus Mathematics

Matthew Goodell

  W  F     8:30-9:50 am

HEG 204

MC

MATC

A course for students who intend to take calculus and need to acquire the necessary skills in algebra and trigonometry. The concept of function is stressed, with particular attention given to linear, quadratic, general polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Graphing in the Cartesian plane and developing the trigonometric functions as circular functions are included.  Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic. Class size: 22

 

19065

MATH 141 A

 Calculus I

Japheth Wood

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

RKC 101

MC

MATC

An introduction to the basic ideas of differentiation and integration in one variable. Topics include limits, techniques of differentiation, definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and applications.  Prerequisite: MATH 110,  Precalculus or the equivalent. Class size: 22

 

19066

MATH 141 B

 Calculus I

Ethan Bloch

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 204

MC

MATC

See above. Class size: 22

 

19067

MATH 142 A

 Calculus II

Silvia Saccon

M  W  F  8:30-9:50 am

HEG 308

MC

MATC

This course, a continuation of Calculus I, reinforces the fundamental ideas of the derivative and the definite integral.  Topics covered include techniques of integration, l'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, applications of integration, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals.  Prerequisite:  MATH 141 Calculus or the equivalent.  Class size: 22

 

19068

MATH 142 B

 Calculus II

Silvia Saccon

M  W  F  10:10-11:30 am

HEG 308

MC

MATC

See above. Class size: 22

 

19069

MATH 242

 Elementary Linear Algebra

Stefan Mendez-Diez

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

ALBEE 100

MC

MATC

This course will cover the basics of linear algebra in n-dimensional Euclidean space, including vectors, matrices, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, as well as applications of these concepts to the natural, physical and social sciences.  

Prerequisite: Math 142 or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 18

 

19070

MATH 245

 Intermediate Calculus

Japheth Wood

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

RKC 101

MC

MATC

This course continues the study of calculus begun in MATH 141-142.  Topics covered include double and triple integrals in curvilinear coordinates, sequences and series, power series, and an introduction to ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 142 or permission of the instructor. 

Class size: 18

 

19071

MATH 261

 Proofs and Fundamentals

Silvia Saccon

M  W  F  1:30-2:50 pm

HEG 308

MC

MATC

This course introduces students to the methodology of mathematical proof. The logic of compound and quantified statements, mathematical induction, and basic set theory including functions and cardinality are covered. Topics from foundational mathematics are developed to provide students with an opportunity to apply proof techniques. Prerequisite: MATH 142 Calculus II, or permission of instructor.   Class size: 15

 

19072

MATH 318

 Number Theory

John Cullinan

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

HEG 308

MC

MATC

This is a proofs-based introduction to the theory of numbers and covers the fundamentals of quadratic number fields.  Topics include factorization, class group, unit group, Diophantine approximation, zeta functions, and applications to cryptography.  Prerequisites: Math 261.  Class size: 15

 

19074

MATH 321

 Differential Equations

Steven Simon

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

RKC 102

MC

MATC

This course is an introduction to the theory of partial differential equations. The primary focus is the derivation and solutions of the main examples in the subject rather than on the existence and uniqueness theorems and higher analysis. Topics include hyperbolic and elliptic equations in several variables, Dirichlet problems, the Fourier and Laplace transform, Green's functions, and numerical and approximation methods. Prerequisites: MATH 213 or permission of the instructor. Class size: 15

 

19075

MATH 331

 Abstract Linear Algebra

Ethan Bloch

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

HEG 204

MC

MATC

This course is an introduction to the study of linear algebra as an abstract algebraic system.  The main focus of this course is the study of vector spaces, and linear maps between vector spaces.  Topics covered will include vector spaces, linear independence, bases, dimension, linear maps, isomorphisms, matrix representations of linear maps, determinants, eigenvalues, inner product spaces and diagonalizability.  This course satisfies the  Abstract Algebra requirement of the Mathematics Program.  Prerequisite: MATH 261, and one of MATH 213 or MATH 242, or permission of the instructor.

Class size: 15

 

19461

MATH 341

 Mathematical Modeling

Stefan Mendez-Diez

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

ALBEE 100

MC

MATC

This is a project based course where students will create mathematical models of real world problems. The first part of the course will cover some standard mathematical models, some examples of which might include random walks on a grid and the convection-diffusion equation. In the second part of the course, students will choose their own real world problems to work on, in consultation with the instructor, and create a mathematical simulation; these problems could involve a topic from another class or project, or a topic of interest from outside of class. We will be using the software package MATLAB to build our models, and will explore how we can apply the mathematics we already know to problems outside of the field. Prerequisite: One of Math 301 or Math 321; or Math 242 or Math 245, and prior experience with MATLAB or NumPy, and permission of the instructor. Class size: 15

 

19076

MATH 361

 Real Analysis

John Cullinan

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

HEG 308

MC

MATC

The fundamental ideas of analysis in one-dimensional Euclidean space are studied. Topics covered include the completeness of the real numbers, sequences, Cauchy sequences, continuity, uniform continuity, the derivative, and the Riemann integral. As time permits other topics may be considered, such as infinite series of functions or metric spaces.  Prerequisite: MATH 261 (Proofs and Fundamentals) and a course in multivariable calculus (such as MATH 241, MATH 245, or PHYS 221), or permission of the instructor.  At least one other 300-level mathematics course is recommended. Class size: 15

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

19030

BIO 244

 Biostatistics

Gabriel Perron

M  W      3:00-5:00 pm

RKC 115

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global Public Health; Mathematics  Class size: 18

 

19056

CMSC 145

 Discrete Math

Robert McGrail

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

RKC 101

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Mathematics  Class size: 18

 

19059

CMSC 275

 Statistics for Computing

Kerri-Ann Norton

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

RKC 107

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Mathematics  Class size: 18

 

19084

PHYS 222

 Mathematical Methods II

Harold Haggard

M  W  F  10:10-11:30 am

HEG 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Mathematics  Class size: 16