92086

LIT 3041

 POETICS OF THE CITY: The New York School OF POETRY AND CRITICISM

Ann Lauterbach

 T           1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 306

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Written Arts After the end of World War II, American artists and poets began to respond to a new sense of cosmopolitan energy as the locus for their creating new forms. The New York School of poetry, named after its famed counterpart in visual arts, drew an eclectic group, including Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, Barbara Guest, Kenneth Koch, Leroy Jones (Amiri Baraka) and James Schuyler. Almost all of these poets were engaged with and wrote about other arts, especially painting. A second generation, centered around the Saint Marks Poetry Project, will be considered, including Ted Berrigan, Alice Notley, Ron Padgett, Joe Brainard and Anne Waldman.   In this course, we will ask how the urban environment affects ideas of narrativity, community, domesticity, nature and place in a poetics of the city. Students will write poems, critical essays, and poems as critical essays.  Class size: 15

 

92088

LIT 3048

 EXTRAORDINARY BODIES: Disability in American Fiction AND CULTURE

Jaime Alves

   Th       6:10 -8:30 pm

OLINLC 118

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights  The course explicitly takes up questions about the histories of people with disabilities in this country and how those histories are documented in literary and non-fiction texts across three centuries. Though the course is primarily an upper-level study of literary texts, we also examine social and medical models of disability, as well as current issues in disability activism and the implications of such activism for young people in the nation's educational, social, and cultural institutions.  This course is cross-listed with MAT for students in the 4+1 program in literature. Class size: 5

 

92468

LIT 305

 AFRICAN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN NEO SLAVE NARRATIVES

Ena Harris

   Th       4:40 – 7:00 pm

OLIN 309

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights  This course has two inter-connected goals: to engage students in sustained literary analysis of “neo-slave narratives” while learning about the major ideas of “critical race theory.” Neo slave narratives are texts by contemporary writers who seek to re-imagine experiences of enslavement, often from multiple perspectives. In so doing, they provide powerful and insightful renditions of the institution of slavery and its impact not only on the enslaved but the enslavers as well. By weaving in various critical essays that examine constructions of race as they relates to power, control, and the law, we will grapple with the realities of crafted identities. The larger challenge is to arrive at a more complex understanding of the history of slavery and race in America via historical fiction and to have painful yet necessary conversations about how these ideas impact our lives.We will read texts [short stories, novels, essays] by Maryse Conde (Guadeloupe), Fred D’Aguiar (Guyana), Caryl Phillips (St. Kitts), James Baldwin (New York, USA), Richard Dyer (England), Ian F. Haney Lopez (Hawaii, USA), Paulo Freire (Brazil), and others.  Class size: 15

 

92428

LIT 306

 BLACK FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE: NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH

Brittney Edmonds

   W        1:30 – 3:50 pm

Barringer House

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: American Studies; Gender & Sexuality Studies This interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to past and contemporary expressions of black feminist thought. Through readings of works of literature, visual culture, music and theoretical texts from a variety of disciplines, we will explore how black feminist writers, artists, scholars and activists address and represent interlocking constructions of race, gender, socioeconomic status, sexuality and citizenship. Course texts include Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Ida B. Wells’ Southern Horrors,  Gayle Jones’ Corregidora, Sherley Anne Williams’ Dessa Rose,  Suzan-Lori Parks’ Venus alongside screenings of the Monster’s Ball, Girl 6,  Watermelon Woman, Without You I’m Nothing and clips from Gone with the Wind. Students will also engage with music and visual texts by Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Cassandra Wilson, and Beyonce, among others. Students will be expected to attend all screenings and/or arrange to view required films on their own time. Class size: 15

 

92327

LIT 354

 Global Cultural Cold War

Elizabeth Holt

   Tu       10:10 am – 12:30 pm

HDR 101A

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Latin American & Iberian Studies; Middle Eastern Studies  In the wake of WWII, the Americans and Soviets vied for global cultural influence as part of the decades-long Cold War, with both Cominform and the CIA's own Congress for Cultural Freedom facing off in a propaganda culture war.  From the Bandung conference in 1955 and its calls for nonalignment and Afro-Asian solidarity, anti-colonial and decolonizing struggles articulated a Third World revolutionary aesthetic.  This course reads diplomatic history, archival documents, and recent scholarship on the cultural Cold War alongside journal excerpts and novels by authors including Arthur Koestler, Tayeb Salih, Richard Wright, Allen Ginsberg, Ghassan Kanafani, Layla Baalbaki, Chinua Achebe, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Marlon James, and Viet Thanh Nguyen.  This course is a Literature Junior Seminar and a World Literature Course.  Class size: 15

 

92089

LIT 3139

 Geography of Unease

Marina van Zuylen

  W         1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 303

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: French Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights  How do we acquire cultural and social capital?  What are the subtle mechanisms by which symbolic power is transferred? The books we read, the tastes we acquire, and the ambitions we hold make us into insiders or outcasts, depending on where we stand.  Do social structures inevitably reproduce themselves or can we ever hope to start over? Using literary and philosophical texts, this class will explore the tenuous process of passing from one condition to another.  Whether this integrative process involves race, country, sexuality, gender, or socio-economics, it explodes the notion of a stable and unchanging self and focuses on border zones of culture and being.  We will explore the threatening and liberating resonances of hybrid states and deterritorialized sensibility. Double-consciousness (W.E.B. Du Bois), double temporality (Spinoza), and double diaspora are some terms that will help us study the pain and loss involved in the plasticity of self, in the broken and rebuilt habits at the heart of our desire to be accepted. Readings from Bourdieu, Rancière, Nella Larsen, W. D. Howells, Annie Ernaux, Foucault, Didier Eribon, Claudia Rankine. This course is a Literature Junior Seminar.  Class size: 15

 

92090

LIT 3143

 Women on the Edge

Mary Caponegro

   Th       1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 306

LA

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  In this class, we will study numerous experimental female authors and their predecessors, concentrating on those who might be least familiar. Emphasis will be on formal innovation, especially as it intersects preoccupations of sexuality and gender. Some theoretical texts may also be employed. Authors read will be chosen from among the following: Dorothy Richardson, Nathalie Sarraute, Anna Kavan, Djuna Barnes, Ann Quin, Clarice Lispector, Marguerite Young, Kathy Acker, Annie Ernaux, Jaqueline Woodson, Carmen Maria Machado, Helen DeWitt, Elfriede Jelinek, Angela Carter, Rikki Ducornet , Chris Kraus, Jeanette Winterson, Giannina Braschi, Valeria Luiselli, Jaimy Gordon, Renata Adler. Some familiarity with Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein will be assumed but is not a prerequisite.  Class size: 15

 

92298

LIT 331

 TRANSLATION WORKSHOP

Peter Filkins

   Th       1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 301

FL

FLLC

The workshop is intended for students interested in exploring both the process of translation and ways in which meaning is created and shaped through words. Class time will be divided between a consideration of various approaches to the translation of poetry and prose, comparisons of various solutions arrived at by different translators, and the students' own translations into English of poetry and prose from any language or text of their own choosing. Prerequisite: One year of language study or permission of the instructor.   Class size: 12

 

92336

LIT 3316

 RENAISSANCE REBELS

Joseph Mansky

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 308

LA

ELIT

The Renaissance was an age of humanism and republicanism. It was also an age of censorship, persecution, and tyranny. This course explores the relationship between literature and rebellion in early modern England. From scatological verse libel to subversive autobiography to popular tragedy, English literature challenged the social, religious, and political norms of the day. Through literature, marginalized individuals and groups—including women, religious dissidents, and commoners—made their voices heard. Why and how did literature become a form of resistance? How did early modern writers imagine and perform dissent? Our inquiry will begin with controversial poetry and prose, from Elizabethan libel to Milton’s divorce tracts. We will then study how women like Aemilia Lanyer and Margaret Cavendish crafted radically public personae in print. In our final unit, we will examine the varieties of rebellion in plays by Shakespeare and Marlowe. Throughout, we will read these literary works in dialogue with selected texts of social and political theory, both early modern and modern.  Class size: 15

 

92077

LIT 344

 Calderwood seminar IN LITERATURE:  Literature Live

Joseph Luzzi

  W         10:10 -12:30 pm

OLIN 310

LA

ELIT

This Calderwood Seminar in Literature will examine the culturally significant literary works that are being produced in the United States today. We will discuss, analyze, and consider these works both for their literary merit and their social impact. Students will be expected to produce a body of writing in the style of the “public intellectual,” the critic or commentator who is able to communicate her ideas—even complex ones—in an accessible style geared for the general reader (i.e., without academic jargon). Our goal will be to develop the tools of cultural commentary and literary analysis that will enable students to take part in the broader cultural conversation. Assignments will include book reviews in the style of the New Yorker, New York Review of Books, New York Times Book Review, Bookforum, London Review of Books, TLS, and other such publications (especially through essays, reviews, and “thought” pieces); a profile of an author, including an interview; and studies of contemporary American readership and literary culture. As part of their assignments, students will maintain a weekly blog that will serve as both a record of their engagement with the course material and an archive for their work. Authors we will discuss are likely to include Jonathan Franzen, Jhumpa Lahiri, Claudia Rankine, Adelle Waldman, Leslie Jamison, Dave Eggers, and many others. Weekly meetings will include discussion of the particular book or work under review; workshops of student work; and analysis of individual authors as well as consideration of the broad cultural trends related to the reception of their work. The Calderwood Seminars are designed primarily for junior and senior majors in the field (or in some cases affiliated fields-- check with the faculty member if you are unsure). They are designed to help students think about how to translate their discipline (e.g. art history, biology, literature) to non-specialists through different forms of public writing. Depending on the major, public writing might include policy papers, book reviews, blog posts, exhibition catalog entries, grant reports, or editorials. Students will be expected to write or edit one short piece of writing per week. Class size: 12

 

92100

LIT 345

 Difficulty

Joseph O'Neill

M           11:50 -2:10 pm

OLIN 107

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Written Arts  What do we mean when we say a piece of writing is “difficult” or “easy?” In what sense is, say, a children’s tale less difficult than a modernist poem?  In this course we will closely examine a variety of short texts in order to investigate such questions, and to think about the different roles a reader might assume in order to productively receive a “difficult” or “easy” text:  decoder, technician, philologist, ideologue, initiate, psychoanalyst, aesthete, and so forth.  In this way, we will lay a foundation for literary theory and develop strategies for engaging with writings that are often deemed to be too forbidding (or too simple) for our attention.  Readings will include the Gospel of St. Mark and work by Thomas Browne, the Grimm brothers, James Joyce, Hermann Broch, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Plath, Emmanuel Levinas, John Ashbery, Lydia Davis, the 9/11 Commission, Annie Dillard, and Arnold Lobel (author of the Frog and Toad books).  Class size: 15

 

92081

LIT 347

 the Late Novels of Henry James

Elizabeth Frank

  W Th   10:10 -11:30 am

ASP 302

LA

ELIT

It is no exaggeration to claim that modernism in Anglo-American fiction begins with the late novels of Henry James (1845-1916).  In their innovative representations of the complexities of consciousness, these novels break ground later excavated by Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Marcel Proust, and William Faulkner. We will begin by reading one or two early short works of James’s, followed by his “middle period” masterpiece, The Portrait of a Lady (1881), after which we will plunge into his three maddeningly difficult but equally resplendent masterworks: The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903), and The Golden Bowl (1904).  We will discuss James’s theory of fiction as high art, savor the pleasures of his tortuous (and torturous) prose while at the same time tracking the adventures of the rich turn-of-the-century Americans he plops down in the middle of European high society.  Equipped with nothing but their new American money and their entrenched American innocence, they are nonetheless forced to comes to terms with grown-up sexuality, adultery, venality, and predatory self-interest, on the one hand, while discovering, on the other, selfless generosity, moral imagination, and the experience of what it truly means to live.  This course is a Literature Junior Seminar.  Class size: 15

 

92082

LIT 351

 Journalism between Fact and  Fiction

Nuruddin Farah

 T           10:10 -12:30 pm

ASP 302

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Written Arts  Literature and journalism have an uneasy and uneven relationship. Artifice, rhetoric, plot, and especially fiction would seem to have no place in the conveyance of news and information. And who wants to read an informative poem? Journalism, by definition, belongs to the here and now, to the everyday (the 'jour' in journalism), while literary writing would seem to have higher aspirations. But sometimes journalism and literature converge.  This course seeks to complicate the opposition between literature and reportage, fiction and fact, news and opinion, and explore what constitutes very fine writing at its most informative. Texts to be considered include various essays by Orwell, Buruma's Death in Amsterdam, Steinberg's Numbers, Baldwin's The Fire Next Time, Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking, Lindquist's Exterminate all the Brutes, Appiah's In My Father's House, Mendes's Bay of Tigers, and Boo's Behind the Beautiful Forevers. Class size: 15

 

92087

LIT 389

 Different Voices, Different  Views

Justus Rosenberg

 T           10:10 -12:30 pm

OLIN 304

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies Significant short works by some of the most distinguished contemporary writers of Africa, Iran, India, Pakistan, Korea, Vietnam and the Middle East are examined for their intrinsic literary merits and the verisimilitude with which they portray the socio-political conditions, spiritual belief systems, and attitudes toward women in their respective countries.  Through discussions and short analytical papers, we seek to determine the extent to which these writers rely on indigenous literary traditions, and have been affected by Western artistic models and developments by competing religions and ideologies.  Authors include Assia Djebar, Nawal El Saadawi, Ousmane Sembene, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Chinua Achebe, Naguib Mahfouz, R.K. Narayan, Anita Desai, Nadine Gordimer, Mahmoud Darwish, Mahasveta Devi and Tayeb Salih.   Class size: 15

 

92091

LIT 405

 Senior Colloquium: Literature

Rebecca Heinowitz

M           4:40 -6:00 pm

OLIN 204

LA

 

1 credit  Literature Majors writing a project are required to enroll in the year-long Senior Colloquium.   Senior Colloquium is an integral part of the Senior Project.  An opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students, the colloquium explicitly addresses challenges arising from research and writing on this scale, and presentation of works in progress.  A pragmatic focus on the nuts and bolts of the project will be complemented with life-after-Bard skills workshops, along with a review of internship and grant-writing opportunities in the discipline. Senior Colloquium is designed to create a productive network of association for student scholars and critics: small working groups foster intellectual community, providing individual writers with a wide range of support throughout this culminating year of undergraduate study in the major.  Class size: 40

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

92034

CHI 216

 Travel & Travel Writing:China

Li-Hua Ying

M  W      3:10 -4:30 pm

OLINLC 118

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Literature

 

92253

CLAS 236

 The Fall of the Roman Empire

David Ungvary

 T  Th    3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 203

HA

 

Cross-listed: Historical Studies; Literature

 

92050

FREN 315

 Literature & Tyranny of Facts

Eric Trudel

M           1:30 -3:50 pm

RKC 200

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Literature

 

92029

RUS 220

 Appointment with Dr. Chekhov

Marina Kostalevsky

 T  Th    3:10 -4:30 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Literature

 

92083

WRIT 342

 The Long-Form Memoir

Daniel Mendelsohn

  W         1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 307

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Literature