92207

HR 213

 Gay Rights, Human Rights

Robert Weston

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 101

SA

D+J

HUM

DIFF

Human Rights Core Course  Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies  This course offers students an in-depth survey of historical and contemporary struggles for LGBT rights, from the right to association and repeal of anti-sodomy statutes, to privacy rights, equal protection, and military service, from employment discrimination, same sex marriage, and adoption rights, to  transgender rights around restroom access and incarceration. While the course focuses on LGBT rights in the U.S., we also consider broader contexts in American history, globalization and international human rights law. Topics in the first part of the course include 1) a brief introduction to homophobia and anti-gay legislation; 2) Pioneering early homosexual emancipation movements in Germany before the rise of National Socialism and 3) Pre-Stonewall “homophile movements” in the United States in the context of 1950s anti-communist hysteria. In the second part of the course, topics include: 1) The Stonewall Riots (1969) and development of a national gay rights movement in tandem with the Civil and Women's Rights movements of the 1960s; 2) Conservative anti-gay backlash and “moral panic” surrounding the anti-gay campaigns of the 1970s; and 3) The AIDS crisis and radical queer activism during the “culture wars” of the 1980s. In the third part of the course, we explore how the political struggle for gay rights has played out in elections, in the U.S. congress, and in the courts, including 1) Decriminalizing homosexuality from Bowers v. Hardwick (1986) to Lawrence v. Texas (2003);  2) Allowing gays to serve openly in the military, from “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (1994) to the Murphy Amendment (2010); 3) Legalizing same-sex marriage, from DOMA (1996) to Obergefell v. Hodges (2015); and 4) Transgender access to public restrooms, from Cruzan v. Special School District (2002) to North Carolina’s  HB2 (2016). Students will become familiar with major U.S. advocates for LGBT rights, such as the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force, the Human Rights Campaign Fund, and the Lambda Legal Defense Fund, as well as with important global developments concerning LGBT rights in the arena of International human rights law, such as the Yogyakarta Principles (2007).  Class size: 22

 

92208

HR 226

 Women's Rights, Human Rights

Robert Weston

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 101

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Human Rights Core Course  Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies  This course provides students with a broad overview of women’s struggles for liberation from the global patterns of masculine domination. Following a brief overview of first wave feminism, the bulk of the course engages students with second wave feminism—including, the critical appropriations and contestations of marxism, structuralism & psychoanalysis characteristic of post '68 feminist theory—post-structuralist theories of sexual difference, écriture féminine, 70s debates surrounding the NOW & ERA movements, and turning at the end of the course to the issues of race & class at the center of third wave feminism. While serving as a survey of the major developments in feminist theoretical discourse, the course is framed from a global human rights perspective, always mindful of issues ranging from suffrage, property rights & Equal Pay, to forced marriage, reproductive rights & maternal mortality, female genital mutilation, sex-trafficking, & prostitution, to coeducation, Lesbian, & Transgender rights. Readings may include texts ranging from Wollstonecraft, Stopes & Fuller, to Beauvoir, Friedan, Solanas, Koedt, Dworkin, Duggan, MacKinnon, & Allison (the "Feminist Sex Wars"), to Rubin, Wittig, De Lauretis, Traub, Irigaray, Kristeva, Cixous, Butler, Walker, Baumgardner, Richards, Moraga, Andalzùa, et al.  Class size: 22

 

92211

HR 233

 Problems in Human Rights: When do human rights campaigns succeed and when do they fail?

John Ryle

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 308

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Human Rights Core Course  Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Anthropology   The course approaches a set of practical and ethical human rights issues through the study of historical and contemporary rights campaigns. These include: the anti-slavery movement in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries (and later global campaigns against slavery, slave-like practices and human trafficking); the negotiations for the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in the aftermath of World War II; the campaign to ban anti-personnel landmines in the 1990s, ongoing debates around Female Genital Cutting; and campaigns for LGBTQI rights. The emphasis is on questions of strategy and organization and how these relate to wider ethical and philosophical issues. What were the challenges that campaigners faced? How did they resolve them? What alliances of interest did they confront? And what coalitions did they form to combat them? The course also considers the questions that emerge from consideration of these campaigns: how have human rights campaigners engaged with—and been part of—wider political, religious and economic changes? Have the successes of the human rights movement—particularly the expansion of international human rights legislation—changed its character? When are local values more important than universal principles? What is the relation of human rights to religion—should human rights ideology be understood a belief system? Or a political language? Is it a form of cultural imperialism? And is its global influence now on the wane? Finally the course considers the challenge that the animal liberation movement poses to the idea of rights and the limits of moral concern. Class size: 22

 

92238

HR / PS 243

 Constitutional Law

Roger Berkowitz

Peter Rosenblum

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

RKC 103

SA

SSCI

Human Rights Core Course  Cross-listed: American Studies; Philosophy; Political Studies (Core course) This course will provide an introduction to constitutional theory and practice in comparative context.   The first part of the semester looks at the history of the idea of constitutionalism in Ancient Greece, 18th century England,  France, and the United States. The remainder of the semester will be devoted to a critical examination of the contemporary workings of constitutional law, focusing primarily on decisions of the highest courts of United States, India and South Africa relating to critical human rights issues.  The course confronts core questions of the role of a constitution in the state and the particular challenges of a written constitution enforced by courts.  By looking at constitutional enforcement comparatively, the course offers the opportunity to test theoretical assumptions and get beyond the US-centered approach that has dominated constitutional study for a variety of reasons (not least of which, the fact that the US has the longest and best established tradition of constitutional enforcement.) In addition to theoretical and historical readings, the course will include substantial case law readings.  Students will also have the opportunity in their research to explore constitutional systems beyond South Africa, India and the United States. Beyond legal cases, readings include Aristotle, Montesquieu, Bodin, Arendt, and the Federalist Papers. Class size: 40

 

92080

LIT 2509

 Telling Stories about Rights

Nuruddin Farah

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 305

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights core course  What difference can fiction make in struggles for rights and justice? And what can this effort to represent injustice, suffering, or resistance tell us about fiction and literature? This course will focus on a wide range of fictions, from a variety of writers with different backgrounds, that tell unusual stories about the rights of individuals and communities to justice. We will read novels addressing human migration, injustices committed in the name of the state against a minority, and the harsh conditions under which some communities operate as part of their survival strategy, among other topics. We will look at the ways in which literary forms can allow universalizing claims to be made, exploring how racism, disenfranchisement, poverty, and lack of access to education and  health care, for instance, can affect the dignity of all humans.  Readings may include: Chronicles of a Death Foretold by Garcia Marquez; Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson; Smilla’s Sense of Snow by Peter Hoeg; Our Nig by Harriet Wilson; Balzac & the Chinese Seamstress by Sijai Dai; Winter is in the Blood by James Welch; The Way to Rainy Mountain by N. Scott Momaday; Wolves of the Crescent Moon by Yousef Al-Mohaimeed, and Bound to Violence by Yambo Ouleguem. We will also watch a number of films based on the novels (including Chronicles, Smilla's Sense, Balzac, Snow Falling), and The First Grader (2001, on the right to education in Kenya).   Class size: 20

 

92209

HR 252

 Far Right Populism

Adam Shatz

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLINLC 115

SA

SSCI

This course explores the rise of far-right populism in Europe and the United States by examining the literature (in history, sociology, political theory and journalism) of this ferocious, sprawling movement; we will also consider how the right has reconfigured itself, adopting (or making peace with) such traditionally liberal causes as gay and women’s rights, particularly in opposition to Muslim immigration. Particular emphasis would be placed on Marine Le Pen and the National Front, the extreme right in Norway (the Breivik case), and the emergence of Donald Trump. Readings by Jan-Werner Muller, Etienne Balibar, John Judis, Arlie Hochschild, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Sindre Bangstad, Edouard Louis (author of The End of Eddy), Michelle Goldberg, Ian Buruma, and Michel Houellebecq. Class size: 22

 

92330

 HR 258

 HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD: THEORIES AND PRACTICES

Chiara Ricciardone

Micah White

 (Hannah Arendt Center/National Endowment for the Humanities 2018 Distinguished Visiting Fellows)

See below for schedule

HANNAH ARENDT CENTER

NA

NA

1 credit  

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies Whether we are campaigning on civil rights, environmental justice, refugee rights, or LGBTQIA and women’s rights, the first prerequisite to success is a theory of social change that guides the methods we employ as activists. The range of potential protest tactics is so plentiful—from direct action in the streets to silent prayerful vigils and self-organized worker cooperatives to electoral ballot initiatives—that every activist, whether consciously or not, relies on a theory of change to decide their actions. If the theory of change underlying our activism is false, then our protests are bound to fail. At the same time, social change is a constant and complex phenomenon, involving factors both within and beyond human control. Often, an unexamined set of assumptions govern—and limit—our attempts to make change. This minicourse intends to refresh and expand our thinking about activism by studying four different theories of change: voluntarism, structuralism, subjectivism, and theurgism. We will track these theories through case studies from the ancient Greek as well as the modern world, considering how each practice of protest, civil disobedience, or resistance understands the interplay between individual and world, natural and supernatural. In our final session, students will present campaign proposals that grow out of the course material. These proposals will be integrated into a final presentation for “Civil Disobedience and Citizenship,” the 11th Annual Conference of the Hannah Arendt Center at Bard College, October 11–12, 2018. Readings may include: Hannah Arendt, Aristotle, Michel Foucault, Leo Tolstoy, Micah White.   Class size: 15

WORKSHOP DATES  (subject to change) Time:  in the evenings 

Monday 9/24/2018, Wednesday 9/26/2018, Friday 9/28/2018, Monday 10/1/2018, Wednesday 10/3/2018, Wednesday 10/10/201.

HOW TO APPLY:

1.        Send a short written response to the following: name a protest (of any kind) and explain why it is a good example of how protest should ideally be.

2.     2. Send a 1–2 minute informal video introducing yourself and your reasons for wanting to take the course. Video should be shared as a link to either a Dropbox or Google Drive file, YouTube or Vimeo video, or similar (due to video sizes typically exceeding email limits).

3.     Applications should be sent to Chiara Ricciardone at chiararicciardone@gmail.com before 11:59 pm EST on Friday, May 4, 2018.

Please note: seminar meetings will be filmed as part of a project to bring activist education to the wider world. Seminar participants must be willing to sign a media release form.

 

92324

HR 262

 TRUMP ABROAD: AMERICA FIRST and THE END OF HUMAN RIGHTS

Mark Danner

   Th        6:00-8:20 pm

       F     3:10 pm – 5:30 pm

 *** See note below.

OLIN 101

OLIN 101

SA

 

SSCI

(2-credits)  Before our eyes Donald J. Trump is demolishing a seven-decade-long consensus on US foreign policy and seeking to impose in its place his own America First vision. Trump has moved quickly to undermine the alliances that have anchored US foreign policy and brushed aside the human rights ideology that animated it. In this seminar we will take an unsparing look at this momentous real-time phenomenon and follow it where it leads. We will examine Trump's vision -- its roots and evolution -- and analyze his efforts to impose it, with special attention to the fate of the US human rights agenda.

*** The class meets 8 times, two times per month, Thurs 6:00-8:20; Fri 3:10-5:30

Thurs, September 13 ; Fri, September  14 

Thurs, October 18; Fri, October 19

Thurs, November 15;  Fri, November 16 

Thurs, December 13; Fri, December 14

 

92156

HIST 2631

 Capitalism and Slavery

Christian Crouch

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 204

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights (core course); Latin American Studies Scholars have argued that there is an intimate relationship between the contemporary wealth of the developed world and the money generated through four hundred years of chattel slavery in the Americas and the transatlantic slave trade. Is there something essential that links capitalism, even liberal democratic capitalism, to slavery? How have struggles against slavery and for freedom and rights, dealt with this connection? This course will investigate the development of this linkage, studying areas like the gender dynamics of early modern Atlantic slavery, the correlation between coercive political and economic authority, and the financial implications of abolition and emancipation.  We will focus on North America and the Caribbean from the early 17th century articulation of slavery through the staggered emancipations of the 19th century. The campaign against the slave trade has been called the first international human rights movement – today does human rights discourse simply provide a human face for globalized capitalism, or offer an alternative vision to it?  Questions of contemporary reparations, rising colonialism and markets of the nineteenth century, and the 'duty' of the Americas to Africa will also be considered.  Readings will include foundational texts on capitalism and a variety of historical approaches to the problem of capitalism within slavery, from economic, cultural, and intellectual perspectives.  There are no prerequisites, although HIST 130, 2133, or 263 all serve as introductory backgrounds. Class size: 22

 

92257

HR 354

 Reproductive Health  and Human Rights

Helen Epstein

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

Barringer House 104

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies  Beginning around the thirteenth century, a radical shift in attitudes and norms concerning family life began spreading from one human society to another.  To this day, they continue to influence relationships between women and men, between parents and children and ideas about identity and the self. Scholars call it the Demographic Transition, narrowly defined as a progressive reduction in the size of families and an increase in the survival of children, but its consequences have included political turmoil, personal and romantic upheavals, intellectual and artistic movements and the spread of diseases like syphilis and AIDS.  In this course, you will be introduced to the statistical evidence concerning the Demographic Transition as well as its consequences for women, children, men, societies and nations. We will cover population growth and family planning, AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, prostitution and sex trafficking, maternal mortality, gender violence, female genital mutilation, abortion and LGBT rights. Emphasis will be placed on how public policies concerning these issues have evolved over time in relation to historical events such as the Cold War, decolonization of the developing world, immigration, the war on terror and changing attitudes to the family. Class size: 15

 

92008

ARTH 247

 Photography since 1950

Laurie Dahlberg

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Photography;Science, Technology & Society.

 

92181

FILM 259

 Documentary in Residence

TBA

    F        1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 333

 

 

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

92315

THTR 352

 South African Theater

Jonathan Rosenberg

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 309

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Human Rights 

 

92034

CHI 216

 Travel & Travel Writing:China

Li-Hua Ying

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLINLC 118

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Literature

 

92060

ITAL 331

 Democracy and Defeat: Italy after Fascism

Franco Baldasso

M           1:30-3:50 pm

OLINLC 206

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

92026

LIT 215

 Heroes, Saints & Villains

Francine Prose

    F        1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

 

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

92075

LIT 236

 THE ARK OF MEMORY: Russian Documentary Prose

Olga Voronina

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 303

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Russian Studies

 

92015

LIT 253

 Isaac Babel & Revolution

Jonathan Brent

    F        3:00-5:20 pm

OLIN 201

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Jewish Studies; Russian Studies

 

92088

LIT 3048

 Disability in American Fiction

Jaime Alves

   Th       6:10-8:30 pm

OLINLC 118

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

92468

LIT 305

 AFRICAN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN NEO SLAVE NARRATIVES

Ena Harris

   Th       4:40 – 7:00 pm

OLIN 309

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights 

 

92089

LIT 3139

 Geography of Unease

Marina van Zuylen

    W       1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 303

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: French Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights

 

92082

LIT 351

 Journalism betwEEn Fact/Fiction

Nuruddin Farah

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

ASP 302

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Written Arts

 

92072

SPAN 345

 engaging The Other in Latin  American Theory

Nicole Caso

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLINLC 210

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Human Rights;  Latin American & Iberian Studies

 

92130

ANTH 275

 Post-Apartheid Imaginaries

Yuka Suzuki

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 205

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92131

ANTH 319

 Toxicity & Contamination

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies; Science, Technology, Society

 

92132

ANTH 350

 Contemporary Cultural Theory

Laura Kunreuther

    F        10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 301

SA

D+J

HUM

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

92133

ANTH 351

 The Interview

John Ryle

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 303

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Film and Electronic Arts; Human Rights; Written Arts

 

92144

ECON 221

 Economic Development

Sanjaya DeSilva

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies; Science, Technology, Society

 

92154

HIST 2237

 Radio Africa:Broadcasting Hist

Drew Thompson

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

HEG 204

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Experimental Humanities; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92151

HIST 225

 Migrants/Refugees in Americas

Miles Rodriguez

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 203

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies

 

92157

HIST 3103

 Political Ritual /Modern World

Robert Culp

   Th       10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 306

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Anthropology; Asian Studies; Experimental Humanities; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92158

HIST 3133

 Resistance & Collaboration

Cecile Kuznitz

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 306

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: German  Studies; Human Rights; Jewish Studies

 

92205

HIST 3148

 Postcolonial African History

Drew Thompson

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 306

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92227

PS 109

 Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

ASP 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Sociology

 

92235

PS / GIS  207

 Global Citizenship

William Dixon

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN LC 115

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights

 

92236

PS 222

 Latin America:Politics/Society

TBA

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies

 

92240

PS 314

 Political Econ. of Development

Sanjib Baruah

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

HEG 300

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92232

PS 325

 20thC French Political Thought

Kevin Duong

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

HEG 200

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: French Studies; Human Rights

 

92294

PS 341

 HUMANISM, HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE HUMAN CONDITION

Roger Berkowitz

M         4:40- 7:00 PM

 ARENDT CNTR.

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed:  Human Rights, Philosophy 

 

92239

PS 362

 Times of War

Christopher McIntosh

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 301

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92121

SOC 205

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

HDR 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92124

SOC 231

 The Environment & Society

Peter Klein

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 201

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Science, Technology, Society

 

92123

SOC 238

 Law and (Social) Order

Lauraleen Ford

 T  Th    4:40-6:00 pm

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights; Political Studies; Science, Technology, Society

 

92126

SOC 326

 Adv Sem:Punishment/Society

Allison McKim

   Th       1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights