19292

ANTH  / GIS / HR 224

 A Lexicon of Migration

Jeffrey Jurgens

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

201

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights (core course) Migration is one of the most important and contested features of today’s interconnected world. In one way or another, it has transformed most if not all contemporary nation-states into “pluralist,” “post-migrant,” and/or “super-diverse” polities. And it affects everyone—regardless of their own migratory status. This course examines the history of migration from local, national, and global perspectives, with particular emphasis on the uneven economic and geopolitical developments that have produced specific forms of mobility into and through the U.S. The course also traces the emergence of new modes of border regulation and migration governance as well as novel forms of migrant cultural production and representation. Above all, it aims to provide students with the tools to engage critically with many of the concepts and buzzwords—among them “asylum,” “border,” “belonging,” “citizenship,” and “illegality”—that define contemporary public debates. A Lexicon of Migration is a Bard/HESP (Higher Education Support Program) network course that will collaborate with similar courses at Bard College Berlin, Al-Quds Bard, and the American University of Central Asia.  Class size: 22

 

19297

ANTH / HR 261

 Anthropology of Violence and Suffering

Laura Kunreuther

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 204

SA

D+J

HUM

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights (core course); Science, Technology, Society   Why do acts of violence continue to grow in the ‘modern’ world?  In what ways has violence become naturalized in the contemporary world?  In this course, we will consider how acts of violence challenge and support modern ideas of humanity, raising important questions about what it means to be human today.  These questions lie at the heart of anthropological thinking and also structure contemporary discussions of human rights.  Anthropology’s commitment to “local culture  and cultural diversity has meant that anthropologists often position themselves in critical opposition to “universal values,” which have been used to address various forms of violence in the contemporary world. The course will approach different forms of violence, including ethnic and communal conflicts, colonial education, torture and its individualizing effects, acts of terror and institutionalized fear, and rituals of bodily pain that mark individuals’ inclusion or exclusion from a social group.  The course is organized around three central concerns.  First, we will discuss violence as a means of producing and consolidating social and political power, and exerting political control.  Second, we will look at forms of violence that have generated questions about “universal rights” of humanity versus culturally specific practices, such as widow burning in India and female genital mutilation in postcolonial Africa. In these examples, we explore gendered dimensions in the experience of violence among perpetrators, victims, and survivors. Finally, we will look at the ways human rights institutions have sought to address the profundity of human suffering and pain, and ask in what ways have they succeeded and/or failed.  Readings will range from theoretical texts, anthropological ethnographies, as well as popular representations of violence in the  media and film.  Class size: 22

 

19185

LIT/HR 218

 Free Speech

Thomas Keenan

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

RKC 102

MBV

D+J

HUM

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights (core course) An introduction to debates about freedom of expression. What is 'freedom of speech'? Is there a right to say anything? Why? We will investigate who has had this right, where it has come from, and what it has had to do in particular with literature and the arts. What powers does speech have, who has the power to speak, and for what? Debates about censorship, hate speech, the First Amendment and Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights will be obvious starting points, but we will also explore some less obvious questions: about faith and the secular, confession and torture, surveillance, the emergence of political agency. In asking about the status of the speaking human subject, we will look at the ways in which the subject of rights, and indeed the thought of human rights itself, derives from a 'literary' experience. These questions will be examined, if not answered, across a variety of literary, philosophical, legal and political texts, with a heavy dose of case studies (many of them happening right now) and readings in contemporary critical and legal theory.  This course will be taught as a network course with parallel classes at Bard Berlin, Smolny, Al-Quds Bard, EHU, and AUCA.  Class size: 22

 

19347

HR 234

 (Un)Defining the Human

Robert Weston

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 101

SA

D+J

HUM

Human Rights (core course) At least since Aristotle, philosophers have sought to delineate the contours of the human, to define what it means to be a specifically human being. To define what it means to be human is at once to exclude those modes of being deemed to be not human—a process of exclusion that produces various categories of otherness as non-human, or even inhuman: thing, animal, savage, slave, other, foreigner, stranger, cyborg, alien. In this course, students engage with a range of theoretical discussions that attempt to situate the human being vis-à-vis its varying “others.” Readings—drawn from a range of periods and discourses—may include: classical (Aristotelian) conceptions of the human, 17th- & 18th-century theories of “human nature” (e.g., Hobbes, Larochefoucauld, Mandeville, La Mettrie, Condillac, Rousseau, Herder, Kant, Schiller), 19th Century Materialist & Social Darwinist thought (e.g., Marx, Nietzsche, Darwin, Spencer) and more contemporary discussions in the fields of cognitive science, socio-biology, philosophical biology, phenomenology, ontology, theology, discourse analysis, Post-Structuralism, Post-Humanism and OOO (e.g., Bergson, Bataille, Teilhard, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Scheler, Uexküll, Lorenz, Wilson, Dawkins, Gould, Plessner, Gehlen, Scheler, Elias, Cassirer, Fromm, Lyotard, Deleuze, Ansell-Pearson, Derrida, Agamben, Lingis, Beniger, Nagel, Janicaud, Morton, Bennet, Harman, Ingold. Class size: 20

 

19346

HR 223

 Epidemics and Human Rights

Helen Epstein

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 301

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Biology; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies; Psychology  Epidemiologists study how diseases and other health-related events spread through populations.  They track down the sources of outbreaks, they explore trends in the incidence of cancer, heart disease and mental illness, and they try to understand the social forces that influence sexual behavior, weight gain and other complex human phenomena.  Because the spread of diseases is frequently influenced by economic conditions and/or government policies, epidemiology can also serve as a powerful forensic tool in the hands of human rights activists. By the end of the course, students will understand how epidemiological studies are designed and carried out; be able to generate hypotheses about the underlying causes of diseases based on prevalence and incidence data; and understand how the presentation of data and the design of studies can restrict or expand our understanding of the human condition.  Examples will be drawn from many sources, including research on international public health emergencies such as Ebola and AIDS and recent mysterious increases in specific mental illnesses. Class size: 22

 

19348

HR 261

 Epidemiology of Childhood

Helen Epstein

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 201

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies  Childhood has always been treacherous. In many parts of the world, infants and toddlers still succumb in vast numbers to pneumonia, malaria and other killer diseases; in the West, doctors and parents are flummoxed by soaring rates of developmental and learning disabilities like autism and attention deficit disorder and psychological conditions like depression and psychosis that disproportionately strike adolescents and young adults. Many children have been   conscripted into armies or rebel groups, or taken from their families and sold.

In this course, you will learn  how researchers study the major afflictions of childhood, from birth to early adulthood, and how the public health and human rights communities have been attempting to protect them, often successfully, over the past two hundred years. Class size: 22

 

19349

HR 303

 Research in Human Rights

Thomas Keenan

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

MBV

HUM

What is it to do research, academic or otherwise, in the field of human rights? What are the relevant methods, and tools? How do the political and ethical considerations central to the discourse of human rights enter into the actual conduct of research? The seminar, required for junior Human Rights majors, will explore a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the field, reading a variety of examples across an interdisciplinary landscape. Readings include texts in continental philosophy, political and social theory, literary and cultural studies, international law, media and visual culture, gender and identity research, documentary and testimony, quantitative analysis including GIS and statistical data, oral and archival history, among others, and many case studies in actual human rights reporting.  The seminar is required for Juniors in Human Rights, and is also open to others if there is space. 

Class size: 15

 

19350

HR 323

 Race and the Pastoral

Ann Seaton

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

HEG 200

LA

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities “Race and the Pastoral”: Ekphrasis, Education, Anecdote(s) begins in the third century BCE, not in Greece, but in Hellenistic Egypt. Theocritus, an Alexandrian court poet, wrote pastoral "idylls" memorializing earlier Greek literature. The pastoral begins with this paradox: it writes about being Greek, but not in Greece itself. Theocritus's "idylls," or "little pictures" feature frolicking shepherds and bubbling Greek springs. Their Egyptian context is almost always ignored, except in a few poems that refer to "Egyptian ruffians" or to the Ptolemies as conquerors. Later critics have enacted their own boundaries, insisting that Theocritean poems explicitly set in Egypt are "urban," and not "pastoral." We will follow this conflict inside alongside the texts we read, noticing how pastoral ekphrasis is often used to elaborate or disguise racial, ethnic, or aesthetic boundaries. After Theocritus, Virigl, and Longus, the pastoral spreads virally--not only in poetry, but also through philosophy and theory, landscape art and architecture, biology, and even in the framing design and practices of the liberal arts college itself, informing the very structure of how knowledge is both created and transmitted. This class will use experimental practices (personal narrative, ethnographic writing, creative/multimedia responses) in addition to close reading and critical analysis. Since the class is (also) a work-in-progress, some course sessions will also be recent lectures, or book chapters. Students are also encouraged to connect their work in the class with their own projects. We will begin with ancient poets, and keep circling back to them even as we look forward to Bacon, Locke, Emerson, the Hudson River School/the "Manor Estate Pastoral" and Heidegger/the "Nazi Pastoral." Throughout, our readings will be informed by queer practices, eccentric readings, critical race theory, ethnographic critique, and archival research. Class size: 15

 

19482

HR 333

 Pax Americana in the Movies

Ian Buruma

M           1:30-4:30 pm

Sun        6:00-9:00 pm

HDR 106

PRE 110

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Film and Electronic Arts  Hollywood played an important role in telling ordinary Americans why World War Two had to be fought to its conclusion. A new world order, shaped by the US and her allies, and protected by American power, was designed to promote the ideals of freedom, democracy, international cooperation, and human rights. This course examines those postwar ideals by analyzing some of the popular movies that promoted them. Through these films, we will discuss the ideas themselves: why were democracy and human rights so much part of US idealism? What was their provenance? What is the connection between human rights and democracy promotion? Films from the US, Europe, South America and Asia will be screened to show how America and American ideals affected the outside world. Screenings will be complemented by a short reading list.

Class size: 15

 

19580

HIST / HR 335

 SYRIA AND LEBANON: A SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY

Ziad Abu-Rish

   T         4:40- 7:00 pm

OLIN 309

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies  This seminar explores the complex relationship between history, modernity, social relations, and cultural production in the territories that today form Syria and Lebanon. The course begins with the late Ottoman period (the 19th century) and continues through the formation of the Syrian and Lebanese states, including the colonial, post-colonial, and contemporary periods. Of particular interest will be the changes and continuities in class composition, gender relations, sectarianism, and national identities. The focus will be on how social practices (e.g., urban planning, family organization, rural-urban migration, etc.) and cultural forms (e.g., novels, plays, songs, films, etc.) intersect with those changes and continuities. For example, how do transformations in the public sphere (e.g., the proliferation of newspapers, squares, and cafes) relate to the emergence of middle and working classes? Alternatively, how were new articulations of masculinities and femininities reflected in literary production, commercial advertisements, and/or school curricula? In what ways did realities of border demarcation and enforcement, along with the organization of representative institutions, challenge, create, or reinforce specific notions of self and community? Moreover, how did prolonged civil war in Lebanon or authoritarian rule in Syria shape the form and content of artistic practices produced in each of those two countries? The course will explore these and many other questions through a chronologically organized syllabus, adopting a comparative perspective that will consider developments in Syria and Lebanon in relation to one another, to the broader Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and to the world. Class size: 15

 

19554

HR 356

 CURATING WITHIN OBSCURITY: RESEARCH AS EXHIBITION STRUCTURE AND FORM

Tiona Nekkia McClodden

   W   10:30 am– 1:00 pm

CCS Seminar Room

 

 

What happens when the research behind a posthumous curatorial subject influences the structure and form of an exhibition or the exhibition of an artwork? This course will examine what happens when research lends itself to formal and structural aspects of exhibition.  We will consider key concepts such as authority, authenticity, preservation, and circulation by retracing the steps taken to produce artistic and curatorial-based work of Essex Hemphill, Brad Johnson, and Julius Eastman – three important yet obscured artists who are at the center of Tiona Nekkia McClodden’s current/ongoing research-based artistic practice. Readings from Hemphill, Johnson, Eastman, José Esteban Muñoz, and Robert Reid-Pharr. Students will be expected to produce a research project about an artist that they feel has been obscured posthumously.  Class size:  15    

 

19107

HR 358

 LGBTQ+ Issues/US Education

Michael Sadowski

 T  Th    4:40-6:00 pm

HEG 308

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  2 credits  This course will examine both the history and contemporary landscape of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and related (LGBTQ+) issues in U.S. education. Students will explore the legal, political, pedagogical, and empirical questions that have been central to this field over the last three decades, such as: What are the rights of LGBTQ+ students and educators, and what are the obstacles to their being realized? What strategies have been successful in advocacy for more LGBTQ+ positive schools, and what lessons do they hold for future change? What do LGBTQ+ supportive school environments look like, and what does research tell us about their effectiveness? Although K -12 schooling will be the primary focus of the class, we will also examine the landscape of undergraduate education vis-a-vis LGBTQ+ issues. As a final project, students will present an "educational change plan," in which they envision how they might contribute to positive change in an area related to this relatively nascent field. The class meets for half of the semester, March 25 - May 21. Class size: 17

 

19555

HR 362

 BLACK AND QUEER IN LEATHER: BLACK BDSM MATERIAL CULTURE

Tiona Nekkia McClodden

     Th     4:00 – 6:30 pm

CCS Seminar Room

 

 

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies Black Queer BDSM archives and spaces resist contextualization in relationship to biographical narratives because of the subcultural and underground elements of the community.  This course will explore the material culture of this community from three perspectives with a significant research focus on finding and presenting new materials: Architecture + Location – When LGBT clubs and queer social spaces closed in large numbers in the 80s, BDSM and cruising spaces were the first to go. We will look at the cartography of clubs in San Francisco, Chicago and New York to highlight dense areas of BSDM community convenings. Visual Artists and Exhibitions –  We will examine conditions that led to the rise to prominence of BDSM-related work by artists such as Robert Mapplethorpe and Catherine Opie while Black artists producing BSDM-related and referenced work during the same period were relegated to obscurity. Black Queer BDSM communities – We will consider the fragility of what an archival engagement with these communities really looks like first hand by surveying existing BDSM archives in research libraries, community groups, and individuals and their personal ephemera. Class size:  15  

 

19298

ANTH 207

 Cultural Politics of Empire: from the raj to humanitarian aid

Laura Kunreuther

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 203

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Historical Studies; Human Rights

 

19295

ANTH 239

 Social Serv/Comm Organizing

Gregory Morton

  W         3:10-4:30 pm

      F      9:30-1:30 pm

OLIN 302

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights

 

19299

ANTH 265

 Race & Nature in Africa

Yuka Suzuki

 T  Th    8:30-9:50 am

OLIN 201

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19300

ANTH 324

 Doing Ethnography

Yuka Suzuki

   Th       10:10-12:30 pm

RKC 200

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

19302

ANTH 349

 Political Ecology

Yuka Suzuki

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 310

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights 

 

19412

ART 200 AC

 Digital II: Manufacturing Dissent

Adriane Colburn

 T           1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER 161

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

19317

ECON 331

 International Migration

Aniruddha Mitra

 T           3:10-5:30 pm

OLIN 303

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

19315

ECON 338

 Seminar in Discrimination

Michael Martell

M           3:10-5:30 pm

ALBEE 106

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies. Human Rights 

 

19396

FILM 259

 Documentary in Residence

Farihah Zaman

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

19152

GER 324

 Confronting Injustice

Jason Kavett

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed:Human Rights

 

19568

 HIST 112

  THREE CITIES: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE URBAN HISTORIES OF Lagos, Nairobi, & Johannesburg

Drew Thompson

M  W      1:30 – 2:50 pm

Barringer House 104

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Int’l Studies; Human Rights  

 

19331

HIST 185

 Making of Modern Middle East

Omar Cheta

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 202

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

19335

HIST 213

 Immigration:American Politics

Joel Perlmann

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights; Sociology

 

19333

HIST 231

 Political Hist/Common  Sense

Tabetha Ewing

 T  Th    4:40-6:00 pm

OLIN 107

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; French Studies; Human Rights

 

19341

HIST 322

 Captive Children and Empire

Christian Crouch

M           1:30-3:50 pm

RKC 200

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Experimental Humanities; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19345

HIST 331

 Latin America:Race/Relig/Revol

Miles Rodriguez

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 306

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights; Latin American and Iberian Studies

 

19332

HIST 1001

 Revolution

Robert Culp

Gregory Moynahan

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLINLC 115

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Human Rights

 

19171

LIT 231

 Art/Aesthetic/Modern Arab Wrld

Dina Ramadan

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 202

FL

D+J

FLLC

Cross-listed: Art History; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

19184

LIT 245

 Palestinian Lit in Translation

Elizabeth Holt

  W  F     10:10-11:30 am

OLINLC 206

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

19367

PS 104

 International Relations

Michelle Murray

M  W      8:30-9:50 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19368

PS 109

 Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 308

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Sociology

 

19375

PS 273

 Diplomacy in Int'l. Politics

Frederic Hof

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

Ward Manor Gate House

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19376

PS 280

 Nations/States/Nationalism

Sanjib Baruah

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 305

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

19465

PS 314

 Political Econ. of Development

Sanjib Baruah

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19509

PS 330

 the global crisis of democracy

Omar Encarnacion

  Th     10:10 am – 12:30 pm

OLIN 310

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19099

PSY 348

 THE Work AND Legacy of Stanley Milgram

Stuart Levine

 T           3:00-6:00 pm

LB3 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

19277

SOC 120

 Inequality in America

Yuval Elmelech

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

HEG 201

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights

 

19270

SOC 205

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

HDR 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19271

SOC 213

 Sociological Theory

Laura Ford

 T  Th    4:40-6:00 pm

OLIN 201

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

19272

SOC 224

 Punishment/Prisons/Policing

Allison McKim

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 202

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights

 

19273

SOC 262

 Sexualities

Allison McKim

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 204

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights

 

19275

SOC 332

 Seminar on Social Problems

Yuval Elmelech

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

RKC 200

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights

 

19454

THTR 253

 THE Politics of Interactive Performance

Tania El Khoury

  W         10:30-1:00 pm

FISHER PAC STUDIO NORTH

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, Human Rights

 

19458

THTR 330

 One-to-One Performances

Tania El Khoury

 T           4:40-7:40 pm

FISH RESNICK

PA

D+J

PART

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

19492

WRIT 345

 Imagining Nonhuman Consciousns

Benjamin Hale

M           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 308

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights