18508

HR 101

 Introduction to Human Rights

Thomas Keenan

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HDR 106

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

(HR core course.)  Cross-listed:  Global & International Studies  An intensive introduction to contemporary discussions of human rights in a broad context. The course mixes a basic historical and theoretical investigation of these contested categories, 'human' and 'rights,' with some difficult examples of the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions of claims made in these terms. What are humans and what count as rights, if any? We will ask about the foundations of rights claims; about legal, political, non-violent and violent ways of advancing, defending and enforcing them; about the documents and institutions of the human rights movement; and about the questionable 'reality' of human rights in our world. Is there such a thing as 'our' world? The answers are not obvious. We will try to find them by exploring, among other things, the French and American revolutions, the 'decline of the nation-state' (Arendt), humanitarian intervention (medical and military), public space and democracy, testimony and information (from Shoah to the CNN effect), war crimes and the concept of the civilian, and the challenges to human rights orthodoxy posed by terrorism and the wars against it. Using The Face of Human Rights (Walter Kalin) as our primary text, along with work in philosophy, history, literature, politics, and with the contemporary news flow, we will examine some tricky cases and troubled places, among them our own.   Class size: 22

 

18509

HR 218

 Free Speech

Roger Berkowitz

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

ALBEE 106

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Political Studies   (Human Rights core course) An introduction to debates about freedom of expression. What is 'freedom of speech'? Is there a right to say anything? Why? We will investigate who has had this right, where it has come from, and what it has had to do in particular with literature. and the arts. What powers does speech have, who has the power to speak, and for what? Debates about censorship, hate speech, the First Amendment and Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights will be obvious starting points, but we will also explore some less obvious questions: about faith and the secular, confession and torture, surveillance, the emergence of political agency. In asking about the status of the speaking human subject, we will look at the ways in which the subject of rights, and indeed the thought of human rights itself, derives from a 'literary' experience. These questions will be examined, if not answered, across a variety of literary, philosophical, legal and political texts, with a heavy dose of case studies (many of them happening right now) and readings in contemporary critical and legal theory. This course will be done in collaboration with other courses offered in Bard's international network. This course is part of the Courage to Be College Seminar and students will participate in common lectures in the Courage To Be Lecture Series sponsored by the Arendt Center. Class size: 22

 

18507

HR 223

 Epidemiology from a Human Rghts Perspective

Helen Epstein

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 103

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Biology; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies; Psychology  Epidemiologists investigate patterns in the spread of diseases, predict when and where outbreaks will occur and identify who is most at risk.   Modern epidemiology emerged in the 19th and 20th centuries when populations in the US and Europe encountered a spate of new diseases including cholera, typhus, lung cancer and lead poisoning.  These epidemics arose from new methods of industrial production, changing patterns of trade, urbanization and migration, and new personal habits and ways of life.  This course how the spread of many diseases are governed by social, political and economic forces.  We will also learn how epidemics have been addressed throughout history, in some cases through medical or technological intervention and in others through social, economic and political transformation. Today, some of our most serious public health threats are emerging not from the material realm of microbes and toxins, but from the political, social and psychological environment itself.  For example, we'll examine how epidemiologists have recently exposed the role of racism in mental illness and of "shock therapy" economic policies on soaring rates of alcoholism, drug abuse and suicide. Class size: 22

 

18533

HR 227

dissent, ethics & politics

Helena Gibbs

 M  W 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 304

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Literature; Russian Studies  V clav Havel, in his seminal essay "The Power of the Powerless" (1978), defines Eastern European dissidents as "those who decided to  live in truth'."  This course will examine the various conceptions and strategies of political resistance in former Soviet Bloc countries, with a focus on the specific role of intellectuals and writers. Central to this examination will be the question of what it means "to say no to power," whether and how such an ethical position can be political in its effects, and the relevance of this question today, beyond the framework of totalitarian regimes of Eastern Europe and Soviet Union. Readings will include a spectrum of philosophical, political, and literary texts by Havel, Jan Patočka, Milan Kundera, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Andrei Sakharov, Danilo Ki , Mikl s Haraszti, Czeslaw Milosz, and Milovan Djilas; supplemental readings by Sophocles, Aristotle, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Tom Stoppard; as well as excerpts from Jacques Derrida, Emmanuel Levinas, and others. This course is part of the Courage to Be College Seminar and students will participate in common lectures in the Courage To Be Lecture Series sponsored by the Arendt Center. The core Seminar texts include Hannah Arendt, "Thinking and Moral Considerations" and Paul Tillich, The Courage to Be. 

Class size: 18

 

18510

HR 234

 Defining the Human

Robert Weston

M  W  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 101

SA

D+J

HUM

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  (Human Rights core course) At least since Aristotle, philosophers have sought to delineate the contours of the human, to define what it means to be a specifically human being. To define what it means to be human is at once to exclude those modes of being deemed not human a process of exclusion that produces various categories of otherness as non-human, or even inhuman. In this course, students engage with a range of theoretical discussions that attempt to situate the human being vis- -vis its "other," traditionally as a kind of intermediary being, poised uncomfortably between animality, on the one hand, and divinity, on the other. Readings may include: Greco Roman & Judeo-Christian conceptions of the human (Aristotle, Paul, Augustine Luther); 17th-and 18th-century theories of "human nature" (e.g., Hobbes, Larochefoucauld, Mandeville, LaMettrie, Condillac, Rousseau, Herder, Kant, Schiller); 19th century Social Darwinism (Spencer) and Philosophy (Marx, Nietzsche); contemporary socio-biology (Wilson, et. Al.); Philosophical Anthropology (Teilhard, Bergson, Bataille, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Scheler, Uexküll, Plessner, Gehlen) and Post-structuralism (Deleuze, Derrida, Foucault).  Class size: 20

 

18989

HR 248

 CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP: COPING WITH INTOLERANCE

Malia Du Mont

Bruce Chilton

M  6:00 pm   8:00 pm

Every other Monday

OLIN 205

1 credit  The concept of citizenship is fundamental to democracy. Critical engagement, lucid expression, and the capacity to empathize with others are always necessary, and are notable for their absence in the American political scene. This workshop will engage students in a topic of their choice within the theme (intolerance), privileging their ability to convey their opinions orally and through essays that might be used as a part of public discourse. A volume of relevant essays on the theme of intolerance will be provided to students and will serve as the point of departure for class discussion. For admittance to the course, students will need to submit to the professors: one question, identifying a crucial issue of intolerance they have encountered and is worthy of deeper exploration throughout the course.  Class size: 12

 

18511

HR 261

 Child Survival & Human Rights

Helen Epstein

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

HDR 106

SA

 

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies  This course will describe efforts past and present by governments, health agencies and foundations to promote the health of children around the world, and explore new challenges facing children today. The importance of prevailing social attitudes towards children and women, as well as the political and economic imperatives that drive government action, will be emphasized.  We will begin with efforts led by UNICEF to save children in poor countries from the scourges of pneumonia, malaria and other diseases of poverty.  We will then learn how American public health officials reduced the toll from these same diseases during the early 20th century using very different methods.  We'll also learn how children today are being affected by AIDS and new forms of mental illness.  We'll discuss America's resistance to the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the special challenges face by LGBTQ children.  Class size: 22

 

18514

HR 303

 Research in Human Rights

Peter Rosenblum

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

AVERY 117

MBV

HUM

What is it to do research, academic or otherwise, in the field of human rights? What are the relevant methods, and tools? How do the political and ethical considerations central to the discourse of human rights enter into the actual conduct of research? The seminar, required for junior Human Rights majors, will explore a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the field, reading a variety of examples across an interdisciplinary landscape. Readings include texts in continental philosophy, political and social theory, literary and cultural studies, international law, media and visual culture, gender and identity research, documentary and testimony, quantitative analysis including GIS and statistical data, oral and archival history, among others, and many case studies in actual human rights reporting.  The seminar is required for Juniors in Human Rights, and is also open to others if there is space.  Class size: 15

 

18515

HR 323

 Race and the Pastoral

Ann Seaton

 T        4:40 pm-7:00 pm

RKC 200

LA

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities  We will begin by exploring what is meant by the literary and cultural category of the 'pastoral.' Is it a mode, a genre, an affect, or something else?  The same critical investigation applies to the category of 'race.' The seminar will consider what 'race' and 'the pastoral' might have to do with one another.  The first half of the class traces the pastoral from Ancient Greece to the Renaissance.  These canonically pastoral bodies, landscapes, and (often same-sex) desires are our pastoral "primal scenes," to be returned to, reshaped, and internalized.  Soon, though, the pastoral emerges in relation to more explicit difference--in early modern travel narratives, Montaigne, and the utopian-pastoral of Bacon's "New Atlantis."  In the second part of the class, we consider the American pastoral (Emerson, Thoreau, Hudson River School paintings), and19th century landscape theories about gardens and liberal arts colleges.  Students will also research local histories and issues related to the Hudson Valley landscape.  Readings include texts by Theocritus, Moschus, Bion, Longus, Milton, Shakespeare, Montaigne, Hakluyt, Mandeville, Francis Bacon, Kant, Burke, Hegel, Emerson, Thoreau, Heidegger, Derrida, Benjamin, Sontag, Edith Wharton, Frederick Olmsted, Adrian Piper, and Mike Davis.  Students will also read Simon Schama's Landscape and Memory, Nancy Duncan's Landscapes of Privilege:  The Aesthetics of an American Surburb, and Cheryl Miller's "Whiteness as Property." The course will culminate in an experimental mini-conference on "Race and the Pastoral" this spring that may include text, video, and performance.   Interested students should email aseaton@bard.edu.  Class size: 15

 

18512

HR 358

 LGBTQ+ Issues in US Education

Michael Sadowski

 T  Th 4:40 pm-6:00 pm

HEG 204

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  2 credits This course will examine both the history and contemporary landscape of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and related (LGBTQ+) issues in U.S. education. Students will explore the legal, political, pedagogical, and empirical questions that have been central to this field over the last three decades, such as: What are the rights of LGBTQ+ students and educators, and what are the obstacles to their being realized? What strategies have been successful in advocacy for more LGBTQ+ positive schools, and what lessons do they hold for future change? What do LGBTQ+ supportive school environments look like, and what does research tell us about their effectiveness? Although K 12 schooling will be the primary focus of the class, we will also examine the landscape of undergraduate education vis- -vis LGBTQ+ issues. As a final project, students will present an "educational change plan," in which they envision how they might contribute to positive change in an area related to this relatively nascent field.  This class will meet from March 27th   May 17th.  Class size: 17

 

18513

HR 359

 languages of history and politics: Human Rights & Bosnian War

Thomas Keenan

Gilles Peress

 T        3:10 pm-5:30 pm

CCS

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities; Global & International Studies  The breakup of Yugoslavia and in particular the war in Bosnia between 1991-95 is something like the birthplace of contemporary human rights discourse and practice. 100,000 people died, in what courts later judged to be a genocide, and phrases like 'ethnic cleansing,' 'humanitarian intervention,' and "international criminal justice' entered our lexicon. It was a human, ethical, and political catastrophe -- and it was the site of many remarkable activist, legal, civic and journalistic innovations. Much of the debate about what to do in Bosnia revolved around the interpretation of the region's ancient and recent history, and often that recourse to history functioned as a manner of turning  a blind eye toward terrible violence. How can we come face to face with history in an honest way, not as alibi or excuse but as the condition within which we take positions andact in the world?  This research workshop, linked to the production of a book, will explore the concepts and narratives, the languages, in which the conflict was played out, through close and intensive work with documents, historical accounts, political analyses and images from the war.

Class size: 18

 

Core Courses

 

18403

HIST 222

 A History of the Modern Police

Tabetha Ewing

 T  Th 4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLINLC 118

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; French Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights (core course)  This course explores the invention and evolution of the police, including the international police, as a modern institution from late 17th century to the present. It focuses largely on France, Britain, and America, with a particular interest in institutional organization, appointments and promotion, training, dress, and public media. Students will be encouraged to think comparatively and globally (e.g., Brazil, South Africa, Palestine, India). We consider the early police as an expression of sovereign right and later of citizens' rights, from enforcer of the king's will to public servant. Changing ideas of security and order not only undergird the history of the police but have in turn developed through police practices. We observe how resistance to diverse forms of policing enters into civil and human rights discourses almost from the start. The course is organized chronologically and around public space, such as:  the market, food security, and price regulation; the port and contraband; the urban street, vice, and violence; the border, the road, highwaymen, and fugitives; state-subsidized housing and the problems of publicness and domesticity; the neighborhood and resistance to policing; and the more abstract (due to long-range and remote surveillance technologies) sites of early international cooperation to state and international investigative agencies, such as the FBI, MI 6, and Interpol. In these spaces, we study the vulnerabilities of individual bodies (including police agents') and social groups that resulted from the institutional growth of the police. Beyond bold acts in the service of order or outstanding acts of resistance, we consider how the policed world contributed to evolving ideas of citizenship and personhood. Class size: 20

 

18411

HIST 2356

 Native American History

Christian Crouch

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights (core course)  From Sacajawea's appearance on the dollar coin to Squanto's role in elementary school classrooms teaching the first Thanksgiving, Americans obsess, discuss, question, imagine, construct, impose, and ponder the role and place of the indigenous population in this country.  Of less awareness is the history of interactions between indigenous Americans and the Africans and African Americans after the Columbian exchange.  This course provides an overview of the history created by and between native peoples, Africans, and Europeans from the fifteenth through the twentieth century.   Special attention will be paid to the exchanges and contests between Native Americans and African Americans in the colonial and early national period, as well as today.   The focus will be on both primary sources and historical interpretations of interactions in order to provide a context for evaluating questions of current Native American politics and the question of financial and land reparations.  Class size: 22

 

18189

SPAN 240

 Testimonies of Latin America

Nicole Caso

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLINLC 120

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Latin American Studies (core course)  This course provides the opportunity for students to engage critically with texts that serve as a public forum for voices often silenced in the past. Students will also learn about the broader context of the hemisphere's history through the particular experiences of women from Bolivia, Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, and the U.S.-Latino community, including Rigoberta Mench , Domitila Barrios de Chungara, and Cherr e Moraga.  We will read testimonial accounts documenting the priorities and concerns of women who have been marginalized for reasons of poverty, ethnic difference, political ideologies, or sexual preference.  The semester will be devoted to analyzing the form in which their memories are represented textually, and to the discussion of the historical circumstances that have led to their marginalization.  Some of the central questions that will organize our discussions are: how to represent memories of violence and pain? What are the ultimate effects of mediations of the written word, translations to hegemonic languages, and the interventions of well-intentioned intellectuals?  How best to use writing as a mechanism to trace a space for dignity and "difference"?  We will integrate films that portray the issues and time-periods documented in the diaries and testimonial narratives to be read - including "Men With Guns", "El Norte," "Historia oficial," and "Rojo amanecer."  Conducted in English.  Class size: 22

 

Cross-listed Courses:

 

18374

ANTH 266

 Anthro:Youth & Youth Politics

Jeffrey Jurgens

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 201

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

18578

ANTH 324

 Doing Ethnography:  Fieldwork and Representation

Michele Dominy

   Th    10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 202

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

18504

ARTH 307

 Contested Spaces

Olga Touloumi

  W      10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights  

 

18194

ARTH 375

 Mexican Muralism

Susan Aberth

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies, Human Rights, Latin American Studies 

 

18388

ECON 321

 SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC Development

Sanjaya DeSilva

 T        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18349

FILM 321

 Harun Farocki: Inextinguishable Fire

Peggy Ahwesh

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Human Rights 

 

18396

HIST 158

 Apartheid:South(ern) Africa

Drew Thompson

M  W  10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 101

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18399

HIST 185

 Making of Modern Middle East

Omar Cheta

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

18401

HIST 213

 Immigration:American Politics

Ari Perlmann

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 308

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights; Sociology

 

18402

HIST 220

 Famine

Alice Stroup

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 107

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

18417

HIST 331

 Latin America:Race/Relig/Revol

Miles Rodriguez

  W      10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 305

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies

 

18408

HIST 2133

 Making of the Atlantic World

Christian Crouch

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 308

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; French Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies

 

18409

HIST 2255

 Law in the Middle East

Omar Cheta

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

18414

HIST 2701

 The Holocaust, 1933-1945

Cecile Kuznitz

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLINLC 208

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: German  Studies; Human Rights; Jewish Studies

 

18418

HIST 3145

 Jamestown

Christian Crouch

   Th    10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Experimental Humanities; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights

 

18419

HIST 3234

 Your Papers Please?

Gregory Moynahan

   Th    1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 106

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: German  Studies; Human Rights; Science, Technology, Society

 

18101

IDEA 130

 Chernobyl: Man-made Disaster

Matthew Deady

Jonathan Becker

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

 W       10:10 am-12:10 pm

HEG 201

HEG 107

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Political Studies; Russian & Eurasian Studies; Science   6 credits  

 

18522

IDEA 210

 people on the move: Causes and Consequences of  Migration

Aniruddha Mitra

Peter Rosenblum

 T  Th 1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

18135

LIT 229

 primo levi:  Scientific Imagination  & the Holocaust

Franco Baldasso

M         1:30 pm-2:50 pm

    W     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 310

OLIN 309

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Italian Studies; Jewish Studies

 

18160

LIT 232

 Middle Eastern Cinemas

Dina Ramadan

                    Screenings:

 T        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

W        6:00 pm-9:00 pm

OLIN 301

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Film and Electronic Arts; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

18147

LIT 322

 Representing the Unspeakable

Marina van Zuylen

   Th    1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights

 

18314

LIT 2203

 Balkan Voices:Writing from South East Europe

Elizabeth Frank

  W Th     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

ASP 302

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Russian

 

18426

PHIL 254

 Popular  Sovereignty in Theory and Practice

Thomas Bartscherer

M  W  6:20 pm-7:40 pm

HEG 308

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Human Rights, Political Studies

 

18433

PS 104

 International Relations

Michelle Murray

M  W  8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18529

PS 202

 radical Political thought

Samantha Hill

M  W  3:10 pm   4:30 pm

OLIN 202

MBV

HUM

 

18439

PS 273

 Diplomacy in Int'l. Politics

James Ketterer

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18436

PS 284

 American Protest: disobedience, dissent, & resignation

Samantha Hill

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

ASP 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

18440

PS 290

 Totalitarianism

Kevin Duong

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 304

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18442

PS 324

 Critical Security Studies

Michelle Murray

M         1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLINLC 208

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18443

PS 330

 Global Crisis of Democracy

Omar Encarnacion

M         4:40 pm-7:00 pm

OLIN 301

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18444

PS 363

 Ethics & International Affairs

Christopher McIntosh

 T        10:10 am-12:30 pm

HEG 300

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18454

REL 237

 Contemporary Islam

Matthew Lynch

M  W  10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 304

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies

 

18462

SOC 205

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

HDR 101A

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18463

SOC 213

 Sociological Theory

Laura Ford

 T  Th 4:40 pm-6:00 pm

HEG 308

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Human Rights

 

18464

SOC 224

 Punishment/Prisons/Policing

Allison McKim

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 203

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights

 

18465

SOC 246

 Race, Ethnicity & Assimilation

Ari Perlmann

 T  Th 4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLIN 309

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights

 

18467

SOC 332

 Seminar on Social Problems

Yuval Elmelech

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 308

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights

 

18468

SOC 333

 Qualitative Research Practicum

Allison McKim

 T        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18327

WRIT 244

 Imagining Nonhuman Consciousns

Benjamin Hale

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

HEG 201

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights