18102

SCI 125 A

 Photographic Processes

Simeen Sattar

M         8:30 am-10:30 am

W        8:30 am-11:30 am

HEG 201 / ROSE 205

HEG 201 / ROSE 205

LS

SCI

Topics covered in this course range from the chemistry of silver and non-silver photographic processes to the physics of CCD cameras.  Laboratory work emphasizes the chemical transformations involved in making gum dichromate prints, cyanotypes, blueprints, salted paper prints and black-and-white silver emulsion prints.  Registered students undertake to review elementary topics from high school chemistry and take an online quiz before the start of the semester to assess their understanding of these topics.  Class size: 18

 

18103

SCI 125 B

 Photographic Processes

Simeen Sattar

 T        3:00 pm-5:00 pm

   Th    3:00 pm-6:00 pm

HEG 201 /ROSE 205

HEG 201 / ROSE 205

LS

SCI

See above.  Class size: 18

 

18051

SCI 150

 Thinking about Thinking

George Rose

  W  F  1:30 pm-3:30 pm

RKC 100

LS

SCI

This course is designed for both science and non-science majors. It poses the question, how have we learned to make sense of the physical world? The answer is far from obvious. Indeed, most of our knowledge is counter-intuitive. We know the earth goes around the sun, not the converse, but that's not the way it seems. All too often seeing is misleading, and our contemporary grasp of reality is rooted instead in deep thinking and testable models. The course goal is to achieve a better appreciation of our extraordinary intellectual capacity to explain complex phenomena by discovering compact descriptions, preferably ones having predictive power. The course plan involves grappling with five transformative ideas that shaped modern science and changed the way we now see the world. In addition, we will examine a promising but ultimately incorrect hypothesis and an unsolved problem that is currently under investigation. Our continuing focus will be: (1) What does it mean to explain something quantitatively, and (2) How do we test the validity of that explanation. Today, the computer is our most versatile tool for developing models. Accordingly, the course includes a related, two-tiered computer modeling lab, for which students will self-select into either a beginner or more advanced group. Pre-requisite: A passing grade on part 1 of the Math Placement Diagnostic. Class size: 12

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18101

IDEA 130

 Chernobyl: Man-made Disaster

Matthew Deady

Jonathan Becker

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

 W       10:10 am-12:10 pm

HEG 201

HEG 107

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Political Studies; Russian & Eurasian Studies; Science   6 credits  We will employ the Chernobyl disaster as a case study of the environmental and human consequences of technology. In April 1986, the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine suffered a major technical problem leading to a meltdown in the reactor core. The radiation release and ensuing clean-up operation required the Soviet authorities to evacuate a large local region, affecting millions of people and leaving a region which is mostly uninhabited to this day. Chernobyl remains the worst civilian nuclear accident in history and its aftermath offers scientific, social, and political insights. This “big ideas” course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the meaning of Chernobyl: it will explore the issue of nuclear power, the social and technological aspects of the plant’s construction and operation, what led to the accident, the authorities’ response to it, and the environmental and social impacts on the region since that time. Laboratory sessions will focus on the physics of nuclear power and radiation, the biological effect of radiation, and the environmental impact of the Chernobyl accident. Parallel consideration will be given to its implications for Soviet governance, nuclear energy and proliferation, and the social impacts of Chernobyl and human-created nuclear and non-nuclear disasters. Examining this event in readings, lectures, and laboratory investigations will foster a deeper appreciation of the complex and interconnected contexts in which such disasters must be studied in order to be understood. The course will feature guest lectures in science, politics, human rights and literature, speaking on issues arising from the accident. Class size: 16