18392

HIST 117

 Inclusion at Bard

Myra Armstead

 T        1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 101

HA

D+J

 

Cross-listed: American Studies  2 credits The nation's colleges and universities have clearly served as stepping stones, remediating against racial inequalities by providing pathways toward upward mobility for blacks and other minorities.  At the same time, historian Craig Wilder's EBONY AND IVY (2013), linking elite American institutions to slavery, Brown University's disclosures of the fortune made in the transAtlantic slave trade by its founders, and the recent acknowledgement by Georgetown University of its sale of slaves to pay off antebellum debts are just a few examples of the ways in which the role played by institutions of higher learning in reproducing racial and other social hierarchies in the United States has been proven.   How have these contradictory dynamics manifested themselves at Bard College?  In this Engaged Liberal Arts and Sciences (ELAS) course, we will explore this question by reviewing the College's evolving admissions policies toward blacks and the experiences of alumni of color at the College, and after graduation over time.  Social profile, oral history, and mapping methodologies will be utilized. While the focus will be primarily on African Americans, we will also consider the history of similar student populations at the College. Class size: 22

 

18393

HIST / LAIS 120

 Modern Latin America since Independence

Miles Rodriguez

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 204

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

This is an introductory survey of the history of Modern Latin America since Independence. The course traces the process of Independence of the Latin American nations from the Spanish and Portuguese Empires in North and South America in the early nineteenth century, and the long-term, contested, and often violent processes of nation and state formation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing primarily on the two largest Latin American countries, Brazil and Mexico, and a Caribbean island with an inordinate historical influence in the region, Cuba, the class studies themes like the results of empire, the survival of indigenous society, interracial mixture, and the legacies of African slavery. The class also examines the main historical issues and challenges of Latin America’s post-colonial independent national period, including persistent inequality, regional integration and disintegration, as well as revolution, military rule, and civil reconciliation. This class will reflect comparatively in economic, social, political, and cultural terms to understand the incredibly complex and diverse meanings and histories of Latin America to the present.  Class size: 22

 

18394

HIST 121

 United States in the 20th Century

Holger Droessler

M  W  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 203

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Global & International Studies  Four decades into the twentieth century, LIFE magazine editor Henry Luce declared it the “American Century.” In this survey course, we will explore the different meanings Americans and people elsewhere have ascribed to Luce’s term. Over the last century, the United States has changed in dramatic ways (global power, demographics, economics), while continuing longer-standing trajectories (sense of mission, racialized citizenship, socioeconomic inequality). Our course themes include the Gilded Age, imperialism, world wars, women’s rights, the New Deal, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the expansion of the federal government, and American popular culture. On our journey through the 20th century, we will put particular emphasis on social, cultural, and global history. Class size: 22

 

18395

HIST 135

 Imperial Chinese History

Robert Culp

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 203

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies  China’s imperial state, sustained in one form or another for over two millennia, was arguably history’s longest continuous social and political order. This course explores the transformations of imperial China’s state, society, and culture from their initial emergence during the Zhou period (1027-221 BCE) through the end of the Qing dynasty in 1911, when a combination of imperialism and internal stresses destroyed the imperial system. Through readings in philosophy, poetry, fiction, and memoir, and use of a rich array of visual sources, the course follows several major thematic threads. These include the ever-shifting definitions of and interactions between "China" and Central Asian "barbarians"; the interdependent relationship between the imperial bureaucracy and social elites; literati, consumer, and popular culture; state ritual, religious practice, and folk traditions; gender constructions and the relative social power of men and women; as well as changes in family organization and rural life. A sweeping overview of premodern Chinese history, the course provides a foundation for further study of East Asian history, society, culture, and politics.  Class size: 22

 

18396

HIST 158

 Apartheid in South(ern) Africa

Drew Thompson

M  W  10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 101

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights  Apartheid was a political beast that ravaged not only South Africa but also much of Southern Africa officially from the late eighteenth century until 1994 with the democratic election of South Africa’s first black president, Nelson Mandela. However, more recent economic struggles and the perceived failings of the elected national party, the African National Congress, has brought into recent light apartheid’s legacies of inequality, South Africa’s longstanding regional dominance, and served as the public’s call for “redistribution” and “nationalization.” This course uses primary source documents to intimately explore apartheid’s philosophical, economic, and social origins within political institutions and daily life from the time of the Great Scramble in Africa. Students will also be encouraged to take a wider lens on apartheid’s development and implementation from the perspectives of more regional histories of activism and war that involved South Africa’s neighboring countries.  Class size: 22

 

18397

HIST 181

 Jews in the Modern World

Cecile Kuznitz

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 101

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Jewish Studies  In the modern period Jews faced unprecedented opportunities to integrate into the societies around them as well as anti-Semitism on a previously unimaginable scale. In response to these changing conditions they reinvented Jewish culture and identity in radically new ways. This course will survey the history of the Jewish people from the expulsion from Spain until the establishment of the State of Israel. It will examine such topics as the expulsion and its aftermath; social, intellectual, and economic factors leading to  greater toleration at the start of the modern period; the varying routes to emancipation in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the  Islamic world; acculturation, assimilation, and their discontents;  modern Jewish nationalist movements such as Zionism; the Holocaust;  the establishment of the State of Israel; and the growth of the  American Jewish community.  Class size: 22

 

18398

HIST 184

 Inventing Modernity: peasant commune, renaissance, and reformation in the german and italian worlds, 1291 - 1806

Gregory Moynahan

M  W  11:50 am – 1:10 pm

RKC 115

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: German  Studies; Italian Studies; Science, Technology & Society   Using as its starting point Jacob Burckhardt's classic account The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, this course will examine the role of the drastic upheavals of the early modern period in defining the origins of such modern institutions as capitalism, political individuality, religious freedom, democracy, and the modern military. The geographic focus will be the towns, cities, and peasant communes of the Italian and German speaking regions of Europe, particularly the Italian peninsula, Holy Roman Empire, and Switzerland.  Two apparently opposed developments will be at the center of our approach: first, the role of the autonomous peasant commune, particularly in Switzerland, as a model and spur for political forms such as democracy and anarchism; second, the development of modern capitalism and technology as they came to impinge on the traditional feudal and communal orders. The course will also address the historiography and politics surrounding the "invention" of the Renaissance in the late nineteenth century, looking particularly at Burckhardt's relation with Ranke, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche. Historiography Course.  Class size: 22

 

18399

HIST 185

 Making of Modern Middle East

Omar Cheta

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies  In this survey course, we will discuss major transformations that the Middle East witnessed from the late 18th century to the present. Topics include reform movements in the Ottoman Empire, European imperialism, nationalist movements (including the Arab-Israeli conflict), political Islam, military intervention, and the Arab Spring (and its aftermath). The course emphasizes the interaction between society, culture, and politics. Therefore, in addressing each of these broad themes, we will pay particular attention to their social and cultural aspects such as gender, labor, popular culture, and forms of protest. In addition to exploring modern Middle Eastern history, students will acquire critical thinking skills through examining primary documents and reflecting on the uses of history in contemporary contexts. 

Class size: 22

 

18405

HIST 2007

 JAMES Bond’S WORLD

Richard Aldous

  W  F  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

HEG 308

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies  The character of James Bond has played a defining role in creating our understanding of what it means to be a spy and an Englishman. This course looks at the reality behind the fiction of one of Britain’s most glamorous and enduring exports, as well as the author, Ian Fleming, who created him and the context of the Cold War world.  Class size: 22

 

18406

HIST 2111

 High Middle Ages

Alice Stroup

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 107

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies  “High Middle Ages” focuses on Europe and the Middle East (with glances to Asia and North Africa), from the first millennium through the fourteenth-century Black Death.  We ask:  How did towns change and a middle class emerge in western Europe; how did capitalist cultures develop, then link East and West; how did universities complement or challenge the status quo in Europe; how did political patronage sustain ancient philosophy in the Muslim world; how did power and religious ideology affect political spheres; how did medieval climate, technology, and epidemic transform Asia, the Middle East, and Europe?  Our primary sources are literary, political, and philosophical.  We examine:  polemical writings about power and justice; Muslim and Jewish philosopher-theologians, whose work inspired their Christian counterparts; and the legend of The Cid, a complex hero, reimagined during the 12th-century Iberian reconquista, in a Spanish vernacular masterpiece of epic poetry.  Class size: 18

 

18407

HIST 2118

 Soviet Russia, 1917-1991

Sean McMeekin

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

RKC 102

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies; Russian  This course examines the Russian Revolution and Civil War; the New Economic Policy and the succession struggle after Lenin; the major phases of Stalinism, from collectivization and the Five Year Plans to the Great Terror, the “Great Patriotic War” (i.e, World War II) and the onset of the Cold War; the volatile Khrushchev era; “soft repression” and the growth of the Soviet bureaucratic elite of cadres (nomenklatura) under Brezhnev; the Kosygin reforms and efforts to improve Soviet economic performance; the KGB directorates and their roles in foreign espionage and domestic repression; dissidents and samizdat; Soviet foreign policy; the Soviet economic crisis of the 1980s and the rise to power of Gorbachev, perestroika and glasnost’; the re-emergence of submerged nations in the Baltics, Ukraine, and the Caucasus, and the collapse of the Soviet Union.  Class size: 24

 

18401

HIST 213

 Immigration in American Politics, past and present

Joel Perlmann

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 308

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Human Rights; Sociology  Dreamers and DACA, illegal aliens, dangerous Muslims, fear for jobs, “populism” gone rampan.  During and since the 2016 presidential election, immigrants and immigration policy have played a central role in American political debate and the rise of Donald Trump. There are also plenty of apparent parallels in Europe. Some of these developments are surely novel and we will try to specify just what is novel in the American case. At the same time we will ask, what is not so new? After all, immigrant cultural differences, race, and jobs often have been familiar themes in American political history. Class readings will focus both on historical accounts of the immigrant in American politics – and in emerging understandings of the present instance. Class size: 22

 

18408

HIST 2133

 Making of the Atlantic World

Christian Crouch

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 308

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; French Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies  The Atlantic: an English lake, an African lake, a Dutch lake, a French lake, a First Peoples lake, an Iberian lake, an American lake, a connector, a barrier, a source of trade, a source of sorrow. The Atlantic World encompasses the histories of the peoples, economies, ideas, and products that interacted around the oceanic basin in the early modern period. This was an international arena that shaped or destroyed new communities and developed as a result of voluntary and involuntary movement. If the rhetoric of empire ushered in the birth of the “Atlantic World”, today we live with the mature, and lasting, effects and memories of these vital interactions. Students will consider not only the histories of the actors and agents who shaped or were shaped by Atlantic systems but they will also investigate what the implications are of how we write or remember that history. Global Core Course.  Class size: 22

 

18402

HIST 220

 Famine

Alice Stroup

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 107

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights  Are famines inevitable? For Robert Malthus, 18th-century clergyman and political economist, famines were (along with war and plague) natural curbs to overpopulation, necessary because humans reproduce faster than their food supply.  For Amartya Sen, 20th-century philosopher and economist, famines result from social and economic policies, not food shortages.  To understand what causes famines, we will examine famines globally, from pre-modern times to the present.  Readings will include Malthus and Sen, plus historians William Chester Jordan, Mike Davis, Robert Conquest, Frank Dikotter, Rob Nixon, and Cormac O Grada.  Class size: 18

 

18403

HIST 222

 A History of the Modern Police

Tabetha Ewing

 T  Th 4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLINLC 118

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; French Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights (core course)  This course explores the invention and evolution of the police, including the international police, as a modern institution from late 17th century to the present. It focuses largely on France, Britain, and America, with a particular interest in institutional organization, appointments and promotion, training, dress, and public media. Students will be encouraged to think comparatively and globally (e.g., Brazil, South Africa, Palestine, India). We consider the early police as an expression of sovereign right and later of citizens’ rights, from enforcer of the king’s will to public servant. Changing ideas of security and order not only undergird the history of the police but have in turn developed through police practices. We observe how resistance to diverse forms of policing enters into civil and human rights discourses almost from the start. The course is organized chronologically and around public space, such as:  the market, food security, and price regulation; the port and contraband; the urban street, vice, and violence; the border, the road, highwaymen, and fugitives; state-subsidized housing and the problems of publicness and domesticity; the neighborhood and resistance to policing; and the more abstract (due to long-range and remote surveillance technologies) sites of early international cooperation to state and international investigative agencies, such as the FBI, MI 6, and Interpol. In these spaces, we study the vulnerabilities of individual bodies (including police agents’) and social groups that resulted from the institutional growth of the police. Beyond bold acts in the service of order or outstanding acts of resistance, we consider how the policed world contributed to evolving ideas of citizenship and personhood. Class size: 20

 

18409

HIST 2255

 Law in the Middle East: from ottoman edicts to contemporary human rights

Omar Cheta

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies  This course explores major debates on the character of legal development in the Middle East from the early modern period to the present. The course examines how law was constituted and applied among both the Muslim & non-Muslim communities of the Ottoman Empire (16th-18th centuries). Furthermore, it considers how this particular early modern legacy shaped the policies of the Ottoman and post-Ottoman states toward legal reform in the modern period (19th-20th centuries). Finally, the course investigates the contemporary politics of law in the contemporary Middle East. Readings and class discussions will revolve around the intersection of law with various social spheres such as religious conversion, gender, slavery, economy and human rights.  Class size: 22

 

18410

HIST 2308

 China's Environment

Robert Culp

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 203

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies  The fate of the global environment in the 21st century depends in large part on how China handles its current environmental challenges. Its massive coal consumption is the single largest contributor to global climate change. Domestic environmental problems like desertification, catastrophic air pollution, and a rapidly degrading water supply threaten to undermine its unprecedented economic growth and political stability. In this course we explore the economic, social, cultural, and political dynamics that have generated this environmental crisis. We also analyze how and why the PRC government has dramatically shifted its approach during the past two decades, from avoiding confronting domestic environmental issues and resisting international pressure regarding climate change to vigorously pursuing environmental protection strategies while emerging as a global leader in climate change mitigation. The course will mobilize a range of disciplinary approaches, drawing on anthropology, history, sociology, economics, and political science.  Class size: 22

 

18411

HIST 2356

 Native American History

Christian Crouch

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights (core course)  From Sacajawea's appearance on the dollar coin to Squanto's role in elementary school classrooms teaching the first Thanksgiving, Americans obsess, discuss, question, imagine, construct, impose, and ponder the role and place of the indigenous population in this country.  Of less awareness is the history of interactions between indigenous Americans and the Africans and African Americans after the Columbian exchange.  This course provides an overview of the history created by and between native peoples, Africans, and Europeans from the fifteenth through the twentieth century.   Special attention will be paid to the exchanges and contests between Native Americans and African Americans in the colonial and early national period, as well as today.   The focus will be on both primary sources and historical interpretations of interactions in order to provide a context for evaluating questions of current Native American politics and the question of financial and land reparations.  Class size: 22

 

18404

HIST 240

 20th Century Diplomatic History

Sean McMeekin

M  W  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 103

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies  This course examines in depth the tumultuous history of the “short twentieth century.”  While one cannot understand the period without grappling with social movements and ideas, our emphasis will be primarily on high politics, war and diplomacy from the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, with a brief epilogue on the post-Cold-War era. This course may also be taken for credit in REAS program, so long as students write a paper on a topic in Russian/Eurasian Studies.   Class size: 24

 

18316

HIST 2551

 Joyce’s Ulysses, Modernity, Nationalism

Gregory Moynahan

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

HEG 201

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Literature  Although it concerns only the single day of June 16th, 1904, each chapter of James Joyce’s Ulysses is written in a radically different historical and literary style. This course will complement Joyce’s stylistic innovation by using contemporary documents (newspaper accounts, advertising, folksongs, etc.) and historical texts  (epics, medieval chronicles, a variety of early and late modern histories) to unfold the historical context and resonance of each of Joyce’s chapters.  We will examine how these various means of casting the reader in time and history illuminate the modernism and political reality of Dublin in 1904. Our particular focus will be the three “nets” of power -- organized religion, imperialism, and ethnic nationalism -- that Joyce feared would enthrall him and which led to his strategic exile from Ireland. Key issues addressed will be the function of historical and mythical time in everyday life, Joyce’s narrative as an anti-nationalist (yet, somehow, nationalist) epic, the role of popular scientific writing and technology in modernism, the politics of gender and sexuality in the fin-de-siècle, the function of terrorism in politics, and the effect of politics and mass media on “personal” experience. Although demanding in its range, this course has no prerequisites other than a familiarity with the Odyssey; admission preference is for motivated lower-college students. Class size: 18

 

18414

HIST 2701

 The Holocaust, 1933-1945

Cecile Kuznitz

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLINLC 208

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: German  Studies; Human Rights; Jewish Studies  This course will provide an overview of the Nazi attempt to exterminate the Jewish people during the Second World War. We will examine topics including the background of modern anti-Semitic movements and the aftermath of World War I; the reactions of German Jews during 1933-1939; the institution of ghettos and the cultural and political activities of their populations; the turn to mass murder and its implementation in the extermination camps; the experiences of other groups targeted by the Nazis; the reactions of  “bystanders” (the populations of occupied countries and the Allied powers;) and the liberation and its immediate aftermath. Emphasis will be on the development of Nazi policy and Jews’ reactions to Nazi rule, with special attention to the question of what constitutes resistance or collaboration in a situation of total war and genocide. This course satisfies the historiography requirement for Historical Studies majors.  Class size: 22

 

18400

HIST 280

 American Environmental History

Holger Droessler

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 202

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies  For centuries, nature has played a pivotal role in the imagination of America. At the same time, Americans have dramatically reshaped their own environment and those of places far beyond. In this seminar, we will explore the environmental history of North America, with a special focus on the 19th and 20th century. Topics include settler colonialism, Native American resistance, railroads, meat production, conservation, environmental disasters, dams, nuclear energy, space travel, environmentalism, and contemporary debates about the Anthropocene. This course satisfies the historiography requirement for Historical Studies majors. Class size: 22

 

18418

HIST 3145

 Jamestown: an american horror story

Christian Crouch

   Th    10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Experimental Humanities; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights  Jamestown: the first permanent English locality in the Western Hemisphere is a settler colonial story from hell. Cannibalism, starvation, constant war with First Nations, Atlantic slavery, and eco-terrorism-Jamestown had it all. Although this story has long been overshadowed by Plymouth and 'Thanksgiving,' Jamestown was the actual model on which all future English colonial ventures were based. The first half of this research seminar investigates historiographical trends centered on Jamestown's changing place in American narratives, including the “myth of Pocahontas." Students will learn strategies used to retrieve and reconstruct different historical voices, especially those of enslaved and indigenous peoples, in order to add them to more familiar historical actors and events. We will also address the problems and possibilities of using transnational, global, and multi-disciplinary approaches to local history. Students will then turn to investigate early Virginia primary sources (oral, visual, textual, archaeological), available through the media portal Virtual Jamestown and will use these to write a research paper. Drafts will be collectively workshopped in the final weeks of term to allow for best practices in writing. This course fulfills the History Major Conference-Research/American Studies Junior Seminar requirements.  Class size: 12

 

18415

HIST 319

 The Suburban Ideal

Myra Armstead

   Th    1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 306

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies  Borderlands.  Picturesque enclaves.  Streetcar buildouts.  Mass-produced developments. Blue heavens.  Technoburbs.  Sprawl.  Typologies of suburbs abound as the historian seeks to comprehend the various transitions they have undergone in the popular imagination, in class and racial composition, and in relationship to their supposed opposites—“the city” and “the country.”  Once a marker of refinement and status in the American mind, suburban life morphed to become synonymous with oppressive conformity, racial exclusion, and gender restrictions.  Some of these characterizations continue today, but have been complicated by the rise of the boutique city even as blacks, new ethnic groups, and working class people are voluntarily and sometimes involuntarily reshaping the landscape between urban centers and bucolic countrysides.   In this course, readings will address these matters by exploring the complexities of historical suburbia in the U.S. from 1830 to the present.   We will focus on several historical types:  Romantic suburbs (early nineteenth to early twentieth century), early industrial suburbs (late nineteenth and early twentieth century), suburban dystopias (post-World War II through the 1960s),  black suburbs (post 1960s), edge-city exurbs that blur city/suburb distinctions and raisie environmental concerns (since the 1980s), and emerging working class suburbs.  In addition to secondary sources on the topic, we will examine literature, films, and illustrations depicting suburban life.  As a Major Conference in History and Junior Seminar in American Studies, the course requires students to produce a 25-page research paper.  Ideally, students enrolling in this course should have already taken American Urban History or City Cultures, but these are not strict prerequisites.  The course is open only to moderated, Upper College students.  Class size: 15

 

18419

HIST 3234

 Your Papers Please? TECHNOCRACY, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIAL CONTROL IN NAZI GERMANY, THE DDR AND THE BRD

Gregory Moynahan

   Th    1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 106

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: German  Studies; Human Rights; Science, Technology, Society  In this research course, we will address the coercive and violent powers of the modern state as they were refined through technologies and techniques in National Socialist Germany, and then alternately condemned and utilized in the two German nations of the (East) German Democratic Republic (DDR) and the (West) German Federal Republic (BRD).  Topics will range from the development of new techniques of propaganda and military oversight to the manipulation of social technologies such as identification papers, the census, racial pseudo-science, and, most horrifically, the concentration camp system.  At the end of the Nazi period, the DDR defined itself through its resistance to the Nazi party, and nearly the entirety of its ideology was grounded in anti-Fascism and cosmopolitanism.  The means of organizing and controlling society were often directly carried over from the Nazi past.  Similarly, the liberal capitalist ideology of the BRD defined itself in complete opposition to the Nazi past, but here as well there were surprising number holdovers from the Nazi era, ranging from the system of registering with the police to the retention of leading bureaucrats.  By comparing the two movements, ideologically complete opposites yet organizationally often surprisingly similar, we can address some of the most disturbing issues of modern techniques of social control.  Similarly, protests within each system against specific moments of state power – ranging from issues such as the use of the census and identity cards to methods of police surveillance and conscription – were frequently couched in terms of their links with the Nazi era.  Please note that the core of this course will be spent writing and refining an independent historical research paper of approximately 35 pages in length.  No previous knowledge of German history is required, although students without such knowledge will need to set aside time for some background reading.  Class size: 12

 

18416

HIST 328

 Jewish New York, 1881-1924

Cecile Kuznitz

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 201

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Jewish Studies  In the years 1881-1924, approximately 2.5 million Jews left Eastern Europe; 1 million of them settled in New York, transforming the city into the largest Jewish community in the world and laying the groundwork for the communal and cultural patterns that mark American Jewish life until this day. This course will begin by looking at the East European Jewish society that so many chose to leave behind and the experience of migration itself. It will then examine issues including the American Jewish labor movement, family and gender roles, religious life, and the development of American Yiddish culture. Special attention will be paid to the neighborhood of densest Jewish settlement, the Lower East Side, and its spaces of residence, work, and leisure. In addition to secondary historical sources, readings for the course will draw on primary sources including journalistic accounts, memoir, fiction, poetry, and film. It will also incorporate a field trip to the Lower East Sde.  This course can count as a Major Conference for History concentrators.  Class size: 15

 

18417

HIST 331

 Latin America: Race, Religion,  and  Revolution

Miles Rodriguez

  W      10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 305

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies  This research seminar will study the violent interactions between race, religion, and revolution in Latin America from the early twentieth-century to the present, to understand how these interactions have mattered to the region’s history and how they explain some of its most violent current conflicts. The very name "Latin America" derived from and became associated with specific racial, religious, and revolutionary meanings through a history of violence. The seminar will begin by studying how racial concepts formed and became fixed ideas through distinct revolutionary-inspired intellectual debates on interracial mixture and indigenous rights. Based in Mexico and Peru, the formation of concepts like global mestizaje, a "cosmic race," and indigenismo involved rival valuations of each nation’s indigenous and colonial histories and cultures, with lasting effects. The seminar will then explore the simultaneous rise of wars and conflicts over radically different religious meanings and faiths, within and outside of Catholicism, including native religions and the rise of Evangelical Protestant Christianity. The latter part of the seminar will focus on Guatemala, which dramatically combined extreme violence over race, religion, and revolution, and focused global attention on indigenous rights and human rights. These histories will allow for a deeper understanding of the rise of different forms of violence in Central America today, and therefore of the current human rights, migrant, and refugee crisis centered there and involving other parts of Latin America and the US. This seminar emphasizes the narratives, interpretations, and voices of participants in the history, and critical engagement with these primary sources in the writing of the history.

Class size: 15

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18371

ANTH 212

 Historical Archaeology

Christopher Lindner

  W      4:40 pm-6:00 pm

HEG 201

HA

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Historical Studies

 

18371

ANTH 212

 Historical Archaeology

Christopher Lindner

    F     1:30 pm-5:00 pm

 

HA

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Historical Studies

 

18393

HIST / LAIS 120

 Modern Latin America since Independence

Miles Rodriguez

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 204

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Historical Studies 

 

18445

PS 378

 The American Presidency

Bill Dixon

M         10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 310

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Historical Studies