92049

FREN 201

 Intermediate French I

Odile Chilton

M T  Th   8:50-9:50 am

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

For students with three to four years of high school French or who have acquired a solid knowledge of elementary grammar. In this course, designed as an introduction to contemporary French civilization and culture, students will be able to reinforce their skills in grammar, composition and spoken proficiency, through the use of short texts, newspaper and magazine articles, as well as video.  Students will meet in small groups with the French tutor for one extra hour per week.   Class size: 20

 

92051

FREN 202

 Intermediate French II

Matthew Amos

M  W  F  3:10-4:30 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

For students with three to four years of high school French or who have acquired a solid knowledge of elementary grammar. In this course, designed as an introduction to contemporary French civilization and culture, students will be able to reinforce their skills in grammar, composition and spoken proficiency, through the use of short texts, newspaper and magazine articles, as well as video. Students will meet in small groups, with the French tutor for one extra hour per week.  Interested students should consult with Prof. Amos prior to registration.  Class size: 20

 

92052

FREN 215

 French Translation

Odile Chilton

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

Intended to help students fine-tune their command of French and develop a good sense for the most appropriate ways of communicating ideas and facts in French, this course emphasizes translation both as an exercise as well as a craft in its own right. The course will also address grammatical, lexical and stylistic issues. Translation will be practiced from English into French, and vice versa, with a variety of texts drawn from different genres (literary and journalistic). Toward the end of the semester, students will be encouraged to embark on independent projects.   Interested students should consult with Prof. Odile Chilton prior to registration.   Class size: 20

 

92053

FREN 240

 Topics in French Literature

Matthew Amos

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

Serving as an overview of modern French literature, this class will focus on an assortment of texts (novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays) that reflect on themselves as texts, on themselves as literature.  From a variety of different perspectives, they all ask the question: why literature?  How can literature serve as a response to a problem (be it personal or political), or, taken from another angle, why is the questioning at the heart of literature often seemingly the sole solution?  This class will explore many of the ways in which, over the past three and a half centuries, literature has attempted to grasp its own essence.  Readings from Diderot, Rousseau, Stendhal, Balzac, Nerval, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Breton, Sartre and Duras (among others). Taught in French.  Interested students should consult with Prof. Amos prior to registration.  Class size: 20

92050

FREN 315

 “Passions du réel”: Literature & Tyranny of Facts

Eric Trudel

M           1:30-3:50 pm

RKC 200

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Literature For the last few decades in France, the “call of the real” (Forest) has presented itself to many writers as nothing less than an ethical imperative. Indeed, texts belonging to referential or “factual” literature have multiplied to such an extent that commentators – echoing Husserl’s famous exhortation – have talked about a “return to the real” (Viart), as if literature, in its rejection of fiction, was vowing to immerse itself anew in the world. Thus Georges Perec attempts to describe the place Saint-Sulpice in Paris as faithfully as possible and to a point of “exhaustion”; Annie Ernaux, in her Journal du dehors, aims for a kind of “photographic writing”, one that should be entirely objective; Philippe Vasset, in exploring the uncharted surroundings of Paris similarly hopes to write “as close to the ground” as possible. But how does one write the real?  And what are the consequences of this drive for truth? How can one reconcile the desire to document, to bear witness to what is there or memorialize what is already vanishing, with the formal and aesthetic issues that are at the core of what we consider to be properly literary? Can one even distinguish unambiguously fact from fiction, truth from invention? And how is our very understanding of “reading” challenged by these accounts? These are a few of the questions that will structure our investigation, as we work through a selection of “factographic” writings – some recent, others less so –, paying particular attention to texts concerned with space, with the urban and suburban landscapes, and with social inequality and exclusion. Texts by Augé, Bailly, Bove, Bon, Clerc, Ernaux, Modinao, Perec, Rolin, Sorman and Vasset, among others.  Taught in French.  Class size: 18

 

 

Cross-listed courses

 

92161

ARTH 257

 Art in the Age of Revolution

Laurie Dahlberg

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: French Studies

 

92089

LIT 3139

 Geography of Unease

Marina van Zuylen

    W       1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 303

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: French Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights

 

92232

PS 325

 20thC French Political Thought

Kevin Duong

   W        10:10-12:30 pm

HEG 200

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: French Studies; Human Rights