18172

FREN 106

 Basic Intensive French

Odile Chilton

Eric Trudel

M T W Th F            8:50 -9:50 am

M T W Th F            10:10 am-11:10 am

OLINLC 210

FL

FLLC

(8 credits) This course is designed for students who wish to acquire a strong grasp of the French language and culture in the shortest time possible. Students with little or no previous experience of French will complete the equivalent of three semesters of college‑level French. The semester course meets ten hours a week (with an extra hour of tutorial with the French assistant), using a variety of pedagogical methods, and will be followed by a four‑week stay at the Institut de Touraine (Tours, France). There the students will continue daily intensive study of the French language and culture while living with French families (successful completion of the course in France carries 4 additional credits). Students must consult with Prof. Odile Chilton before on-line registration.   Class size: 22

 

18173

FREN 203

 Intermediate French III

Odile Chilton

M T  Th   10:10 am-11:10 am

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

In this continuation of the study of French civilization and culture, students will be able to reinforce their skills in grammar, composition and spoken proficiency, through the use of short texts, newspaper and magazine articles, as well as video. Students will meet the French tutor for one extra hour during the week for workshops.  Class size: 20

 

18174

FREN 270

 Advanced Composition and ConversAtIOn

Matthew Amos

 T  Th    1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLINLC 206

FL

FLLC

This course is primarily intended to help students fine-tune their command of spoken and written French. It focuses on a wide and diverse selection of writings (short works of fiction, poems, philosophical essays, political analysis, newspaper editorials or magazine articles, etc.) loosely organized around a single theme. The readings provide a rich ground for cultural investigation, intellectual exchange, in-class debates, in-depth examination of stylistics and, of course, vocabulary acquisition. Students are encouraged to write on a regular basis and expected to participate fully in class discussion and debates. A general review of grammar is also conducted throughout the course. Class size: 20

 

18175

FREN 344

 THE LOST AND FOUND ART OF CONVERSATION: FROM MONTAIGNE TO BECKETT

Marina van Zuylen

  W         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  Since Socrates, conversation has been admired for its seamless ability to perform thinking, to integrate knowledge into society, and to supplement savoir (knowledge) with savoir-vivre (the art of living).  But conversation, precisely because it clashes with the useful, has often been condemned as merely artful, dangerous for its proximity to the decadent and the idle.   In his Essais, Montaigne dwells on the relationship between idle conversational banter and self-reflection.  With Pascal, idleness becomes the cornerstone of our existential malaise.  With the advent of the bourgeoisie, the art of conversation will retreat backstage, replaced by a relationship to work that Paul Lafargue (Marx's son-in-law) describes as an excuse for not tackling la vie elle-même.  Paradoxically, work has become an escapist diversion and the time to rest and to converse has been usurped by the false plenitude of mechanical labor.  Proust’s In Search of Lost Time adds a new twist to this dichotomy: for the social climber, conversation becomes work, a laborious exercise in appearing rather than being.  This course examines how these tensions are played out both on a rhetorical and on a thematic level.  After reading a selection of critiques of “pure” work (Aristotle, Marx, and Nietzsche), we will examine texts that expose the vanity of conversation (Pascal’s Pensées, Molière’s Le Misanthrope), novels that thematize the tensions between work and conversation as social and cultural phenomena  (Stendhal, Le Rouge et le noir), and works that offer up possible aesthetic theories of conversation (Proust, Contre Sainte Beuve and excerpts from La Recherche).  We will also scrutinize instances where conversation becomes a mere filler (Beckett’s Waiting for Godot).  Students will also read Paul Lafargue’s Le Droit à la paresse and Corinne Maier’s Laziness, the recent French bestseller attacking the dangers of work.  Taught in French.  Class size: 15

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18403

HIST 222

 A History of the Modern Police

Tabetha Ewing

 T  Th    4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLINLC 118

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; French Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18408

HIST 2133

 Making of the Atlantic World

Christian Crouch

M  W      11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 308

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; French Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies