92301

FIN  291

FOUNDATIONS OF FINANCE AND INVESTMENTS

Pavlina Tcherneva & Oleksandr Valchysen

  M  W    10:10 – 11:50 am

LEVY

MC

MATC

Cross-listed:  Economics This course explores the foundations of the pricing of financial instruments and the structure and organization of financial markets. Methods will be developed to analyze and measure financial performance, price stocks and bonds, evaluate portfolios and understand financial derivatives as these relate to financial data.  Additional topics include the investment decision-making process; trading practices; risk assessment and diversification.  This course involves a substantial amount of statistical analysis and calculation, but no prior knowledge of statistics is required. 

Class size: 22

 

92302

ECON / FIN 390

 CONTEMPORARY DEVELOPMENTS IN FINANCE

Taun Toay

  T          3:30– 5:50 pm

OLIN 307

MC

MATC

Cross-listed:  Economics The seminar will contrast the academic analysis of financial economics with the coverage it receives in the newspapers and on the nightly newscast. The stories on the news are almost always connected with people, whether we observe them shouting bids in a trading floor or talking on two phones simultaneously. Financial markets are dominated by people behaving in many different ways. Yet traditional finance theories concentrate on efficient markets, predictable prices that are determined by the concepts of present value, rates of return and analysis and pricing of computable risks. Human behavior has neither a place in the theory nor a need to be studied. This prevailing view has recently been challenged by the new paradigm of behavioral finance that considers the many anomalies of "rational" behavior and "efficiency" of markets. The new paradigm concerns itself with economic decision-making and investor psychology, and specifically with questions relating to how and why people exhibit a mixture of rational and irrational behavior. The seminar will examine the influence of economic psychology in the decision-making process of various agents as well as in the market's dynamics. Several guest lecturers will also offer their informed views in the development of contemporary finance.  Class size: 15

 

 

92136

ECON 100 A

 Principles of Economics

Pavlina Tcherneva

  W  F     11:50-1:10 pm

HEG 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Global & International Studies  This course is a one-semester introduction to the essential ideas of economic analysis. The microeconomics component of the course develops the basic model of consumer and firm behavior, including demand and supply, in the context of an idealized competitive market and examines several ways in which the real world deviates from this model—including monopoly and other forms of imperfect competition; information problems; minimum wages and other price controls; taxes; and government regulation. The macroeconomics component studies the aggregate behavior of modern economies - the factors leading to economic growth, explanations of booms and recessions, unemployment, interest rates, inflation, and budget deficits or surpluses – and the government’s ability (or inability) to use monetary and fiscal policies to achieve economic goals such as full employment and price stability. This course replaces the two-semester introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics sequence and is the foundational course in the economics curriculum. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic. Class size: 22

 

92137

ECON 100 B

 Principles of Economics

Michael Martell

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

ALBEE 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Global & International Studies

 

92138

ECON 100 C

 Principles of Economics

Kris Feder

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

HEG 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Global & International Studies

 

92139

ECON 100 D

 Principles of Economics

Daniella Medina

T  Th     10:10-11:30 am

RKC 115

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Global & International Studies

 

92140

ECON 201

 Intermediate Microeconomics

Aniruddha Mitra

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance  Microeconomics is the study of how individual economic units (households and firms) interact to determine outcomes (allocation of goods and services) in a market setting. In this course, we attempt to achieve the following three objectives: (1) Understand all the concepts covered in Introduction to Microeconomics in terms of mathematics; (2) Study advanced topics such as choice under uncertainty and information asymmetry that have traditionally relied on mathematics for illustration of ideas; and (3) Learn how to use mathematics to conduct in-depth economic analysis. In order to meet the last objective, we will devote most of the weekly “lab” sessions toward problem solving. During the lab sessions, students are expected to take turns explaining how to solve a particular problem to the rest of the class. A firm grasp of the materials covered in this course is essential to reading economics journal articles and pursuing advanced studies in economics.   Prerequisites: Calculus I and ECON 100. Class size: 22

 

92145

ECON 229

 Introduction to Econometrics

Sanjaya DeSilva

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

ALBEE 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies  This course explores the tools economists use to summarize and interpret data. The first half of the semester introduces the concepts of random variables, probability distributions, sampling, descriptive statistics and statistical inference. The second half focuses on simple and multiple regression analysis. The emphasis is on acquiring a practical knowledge of econometric methods (theoretical foundations and advanced techniques are covered in Econ 329); students will learn how to organize and analyze data using Excel and STATA, how to read and interpret published empirical research, and how to carry out an empirical research project. This course fulfills the statistical methods requirement for the economics major. Prerequisite: Economics 100 and Pre-calculus.  Class size: 18

 

92148

ECON 329

 Advanced Econometrics

Gautam Sethi

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLINLC 210

MC

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Obama bemoaned that in the United States women get paid only 77% of the wages earned by men for comparable work, a claim that involves comparing two population means and tested using sample data. While such a comparison might seem straightforward, it is actually hard because other factors -- how sample data are collected, which individuals choose to participate in the labor market, variations in their education and family background etc. -- are likely to affect the sample means. Using sophisticated methods, econometrics allows analysts to cleverly isolate the effect of the wage gap due to gender alone. It is this last aspect that makes econometrics both challenging and exciting, and this course promises to take you on an exciting sleuthing journey at the end of which you could expect to develop the skills of a thoughtful data detective.  Class size: 15