See Economics section for descriptions.

19304

ECON 100 A

 Principles of Economics

Michael Martell

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Global & International Studies  This course is a one-semester introduction to the essential ideas of economic analysis. The microeconomics component of the course develops the basic model of consumer and firm behavior, including demand and supply, in the context of an idealized competitive market and examines several ways in which the real world deviates from this model—including monopoly and other forms of imperfect competition; information problems; minimum wages and other price controls; taxes; and government regulation. The macroeconomics component studies the aggregate behavior of modern economies - the factors leading to economic growth, explanations of booms and recessions, unemployment, interest rates, inflation, and budget deficits or surpluses – and the government’s ability (or inability) to use monetary and fiscal policies to achieve economic goals such as full employment and price stability. This course replaces the two-semester introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics sequence and is the foundational course in the economics curriculum. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic.  Class size: 22

 

19305

ECON 100 B

 Principles of Economics

Michael Martell

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Global & International Studies

 

19306

ECON 100 C

 Principles of Economics

Aniruddha Mitra

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 205

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Global & International Studies

 

19307

ECON 201

 Intermediate Microeconomics

Kris Feder

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance  Microeconomics is the study of how individual economic units (households and firms) interact to determine outcomes (allocation of goods and services) in a market setting. In this course, we attempt to achieve the following three objectives: (1) Understand all the concepts covered in Introduction to Microeconomics in terms of mathematics; (2) Study advanced topics such as choice under uncertainty and information asymmetry that have traditionally relied on mathematics for illustration of ideas; and (3) Learn how to use mathematics to conduct in-depth economic analysis. In order to meet the last objective, we will devote most of the weekly “lab” sessions toward problem solving. During the lab sessions, students are expected to take turns explaining how to solve a particular problem to the rest of the class. A firm grasp of the materials covered in this course is essential to reading economics journal articles and pursuing advanced studies in economics.   Prerequisites: Calculus I and ECON 100. Class size: 22

 

19310

ECON 203

 Game Theory

Aniruddha Mitra

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLINLC 115

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies  Game Theory is the study of how rational actors behave when they know that their actions hold consequences not just for themselves but for others as well and they are, in turn, affected by the actions taken by others. While the discipline has come to be regarded as a core area of economics, its applicability extends far beyond the analysis of economic behavior. The object of this course is to introduce you to the basics of game theory, emphasizing its generality as an analytical paradigm for social science. We shall, therefore, focus on a wide variety of applications taken from economics, political science, and the study of the environment.     Prerequisite: MATH 110,   Precalculus Mathematics, or a passing grade on Part II of the Math Placement Test. Class size: 22

 

19312

ECON 229

 Introduction to Econometrics

Sanjaya DeSilva

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

ALBEE 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies  This course explores the tools economists use to summarize and interpret data. The first half of the semester introduces the concepts of random variables, probability distributions, sampling, descriptive statistics and statistical inference. The second half focuses on simple and multiple regression analysis. The emphasis is on acquiring a practical knowledge of econometric methods (theoretical foundations and advanced techniques are covered in Econ 329); students will learn how to organize and analyze data using Excel and STATA, how to read and interpret published empirical research, and how to carry out an empirical research project. This course fulfills the statistical methods requirement for the economics major. Prerequisite: Economics 100 and Pre-calculus.  Class size: 18

 

19316

ECON 391

 Corporate Finance

Leanne Ussher

M           10:10-12:30 pm

 

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance  Capital is a scarce resource. Access to capital and its efficient use are critical to business success. This course discusses how capital can be raised and allocated within corporations to the advantage of corporate shareholders. Topics include: allocation of capital for investments, measurement of the opportunity cost of capital, capital structure, cash-distribution policy, corporate restructuring, and long-term financing. At the end of course, you will know how to value a company. On the way the topics we shall cover those that are important to all managers whether or not they specialize in finance: (1) procedures for analyzing companies’ financial data to determine how efficiently they have been run; (2) methods for projecting funding needs based on principles of good working capital management; (3) rules for choosing the maximal safe, or optimal, level of debt in the structure of capital used for funding company operations; (4) figuring the costs of the various types of funds that a company uses and its weighted average cost of capital; and (5) combining all the foregoing into a methodology, to wit, discounting free cash flows and adding salvage value, for establishing a company’s value or price.  Class size: 20