19377

FILM 114

 History of Cinema: global Sound film to 1980

Mallory Ahern

Screening:

M           1:30-4:30 pm

Sun       6:00-9:00 pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Designed for first-year students, this course (the second part of a two-part survey) surveys the global history of cinema from the transition to synchronized sound in the 1930s to the late 1970s. Students will learn how the advent of sound impacted the development of narrative film aesthetics in both popular and art cinema traditions. Classical Hollywood cinema will play a major role in our discussions as an industrial and aesthetic system, as well as a hegemonic force that both threatened and inspired various international efforts toward independent filmmaking. Moving into the 1960s, we will focus especially on cinematic “New Waves," comparing film movements in countries that may include France, Japan, the Czech Republic, and Brazil, and paying special attention to how both national culture and international exchange affected film aesthetics. We will also explore the politically and aesthetically radical interventions of both experimental and documentary filmmakers. Readings will offer narrative overviews of the major developments in film history, as well as historically important theoretical texts by authors such as André Bazin, Laura Mulvey, James Baldwin, Susan Sontag, and others.

Class size: 25

 

19381

FILM 130 A

 Praxis

Jacqueline Goss

 T           10:10-1:10 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

2-credits  This is a production course designed for first-year students intending to concentrate in Film and Electronic Arts. The course will cover the basics of video production: camera operation, lighting, sound recording, and editing. Participants will each produce one final project utilizing the techniques covered in class. Designed for students with no prior video production experience. Pre-requisite: one film history course. The course will meet every other Tuesday for the full semester. Class size: 12

 

19387

FILM 130 B

 Praxis

Jacqueline Goss

  W         10:10-1:10 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

See above. This course meets every other week.  Class size: 12

 

19397

FILM 167

 Survey of Electronic Art

Edward Halter

Screening:

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

   W        7:00-10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology, Society  Open to First-year students only. An introductory lecture course on the history of moving-image art made with electronic media, from the earliest computer-generated films, through television, the portable video camera, the internet, and gaming. Topics include analog versus digital, guerrilla television, expanded cinema, feminist media, video and performance, internet art, video installation, and the question of video games as art. Requirements include two short essays and a final in-class exam or final research paper.  Class size: 25

 

19391

FILM 203

 Performance & Video

Ben Coonley

   Th       10:10-1:10 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities, Theater and Performance  This course explores intersections of video and performance art. Course participants develop strategies for exploiting video's most fundamental property: its ability to reproduce a stream of real-time synchronized images and sounds. How does video technology mediate between on-screen performer and audience? How can artists interested in creating critical and self-reflexive media respond to video’s immediacy and “liveness”? How can performance artists use video playback devices, displays, projectors, interactive elements, and live video mixing software to shape and enhance live art? The first half of the course concentrates on the creation of performance “tapes” (or tape-less video recordings) and the history of experimental video focused on performance for the camera. The second half of the course concentrates on the use of video as a central component within live performance art. We will read about and carry on a sustained conversation about the cultural and psychological impact of video technology on subjectivity and conceptions of the artist as "medium." Readings on and viewings of work by Marina Abramović, Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, Trisha Baga, John Baldessari, Paul Chan, Patty Chang, Chris Burden, Coco Fusco,  Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Wynne Greenwood, Nancy Holt, Joan Jonas, Miranda July, Mike Kelley, George Kuchar, Kalup Linzy, Tata Mateik, Shana Moulton, Jayson Musson, Bruce Nauman, Nam Jun Paik, Sondra Perry, Walid Raad, Martha Rosler, Jacolby Satterwhite, Michael Smith, Ryan Trecartin, Andy Warhol, William Wegman, among others.  Class size: 12

 

19383

FILM 205

 Gesture, Light, & Motion

Kelly Reichardt

 T           1:30-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

A filmmaking workshop introducing the student to the narrative form through the qualities of gesture, light and motion on screen. Focusing on these elements above dialogue and literary approaches to storytelling allows the filmmaker to develop expressive control to communicate a deep sense of character.  Approaches to visual storytelling, examination of narrative strategies, hands-on shooting, and solutions of practical and/or aesthetic problems, as they are encountered in the making of a film. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

19392

FILM 207

 Electronic Media Workshop

Brent Green

   Th       10:10-1:10 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

This course is designed to introduce you to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation.  The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student.  To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize you with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Adobe Premiere, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

19379

FILM 208 A

 Introduction to 16mm Film

Ephraim Asili

(Justin Weldon)

M           1:30-4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PA

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 10

 

19384

FILM 208 B

 Introduction to 16mm Film

Peggy Ahwesh

 T           1:30-4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PA

PART

See above.  Class size: 10

 

19636

FILM 220

 Internet Aesthetics

Edward Halter

Screening:

    F        10:10-1:10 pm

  Th        8:00-11:00 pm

AVERY 217

AA

AART

This course will examine how critical and philosophical approaches to thinking about art’s relationship to the internet have evolved along with changes in networked technology since the advent of the World Wide Web. Topics to be considered: Does art made with, on, or about the internet require new evaluative models? Has the internet altered the relationship between the artist, the artwork and the audience? How has internet art been curated and exhibited? How can we distinguish such art from other cultural, creative and political uses of new technologies? Through lectures and discussions, we will look at historical and contemporary examples of internet art in relations to forms such as literature, cinema and performance. We’ll also read and discuss writers who explore issues relevant to the question of internet aesthetics. Artists studied will include Olia Lialina, JODI, Vuk Cosic, Keith + Mendi Obadike, Seth Price, Cory Arcangel, Guthrie Lonergan, Aleksandra Domanović, Rafael Rozendaal, Oliver Laric, Hito Steyerl, Jayson Musson, Ryan Trecartin, Trevor Paglen, Amalia Ulman, Laura Poitras, Camille Henrot, Sondra Perry and others. Concepts covered will include interactivity, appropriation, simulation, generative art, race and identity in networked culture, technological determinism, medium specificity, relational aesthetics, the question of immateriality, and the aesthetics of online propaganda. Grades will be based on in-class discussion, writing assignments and a final essay. Class size: 15

 

19390

FILM 229

 Character and Story

A. Sayeeda Moreno

  W         1:30-4:30 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

An introductory screenwriting course that focuses on writing character-driven short pieces.  There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques.  The course will cover story structure and story design in relationship to character development.  The students will complete a short character study screenplay. No prerequisites.  Class size: 12

 

19380

FILM 253

 Feminist Film and Media

Mallory Ahern

Screening:

 T           10:10-1:10 pm

M           6:00-9:00 pm

AVERY 110

AA

D+J

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  This class will engage the main questions and debates of feminist theory across cinema, television, and new media, with a focus on feminist film practice. Weekly screenings will showcase the work of female-identified (and feminist-identified) filmmakers working across narrative, experimental, and documentary filmmaking traditions. We will ask how both critics and artists have responded to the limited ways in which mainstream media imagines femininity, and imagined anti-patriarchal forms of representation. Theoretical topics of interest will include the “male gaze,” women as consumers, fashion, gendered and racial passing, black feminist theory, and feminist theories of affective and emotional labor. Filmmakers and artists discussed will include Chantal Akerman, Laura Mulvey, Yvonne Rainer, Yoko Ono, Sara Gómez, Julie Dash, Dorothy Arzner, Agnés Varda, Sally Potter, Carolee Schneeman, Barbara Hammer, Peggy Ahwesh, Zeinabu irene Davis, Sadie Benning, Ngozi Onwurah, Trinh T. Minh-Ha, and others.  Class size: 20

 

19396

FILM 259

 Documentary in Residence

Farihah Zaman

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Human Rights An introductory video production course for students interested in social issues, reportage, home movies, travelogues and other forms of the non-fiction film. Taught by the Film and Electronic Arts Program's visiting documentarian. No prerequisites. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.Class size: 12

 

19395

FILM 310

 Post-War France & Italy

John Pruitt

 Screening:

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

  W         6:00-9:00 pm

AVERY 117

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities   A lecture survey of two major cinematic schools in post-war Western Europe, both of which had enormous international influence at the time, an  influence which arguably can still be felt in contemporary film. We will study four concentrated historical moments of remarkably intense, creative activity: (1) the immediate post-war years in Italy of Neo-realism, dominated by Rossellini, Visconti and De Sica (2) the mid-fifties in France when Tati and Bresson are most impressive as "classicists";(3) the late fifties and early sixties of The French New Wave with the dawn of the directorial careers of Godard, Truffaut, Rivette, Varda, Rohmer, Chabrol et al., and the miraculous maturation of a number of key directors in Italy at roughly the same time, best represented by Fellini, Antonioni, Olmi and Pasolini. Required supplementary readings. Two essay exams and a term paper. Open to non-Film majors.Class size: 14

 

19393

FILM 312

 Advanced Screenwriting

A. Sayeeda Moreno

   Th       10:10-1:10 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts An intensive workshop designed specifically for someone who plans to make a film for moderation or senior project. In a seminar setting, we will work on multiple drafts and be utilizing actors to workshop the scripts. The goal will be to develop a concise and polished script to become the basis for a short film. Students must currently have a short script in progress, maximum 15 pages, that they will be workshopping during the semester. Pre-requisite: Film 256 - Writing the Film OR Film 229 - Character & Story, or the successful completion of a sophomore level production class. Non-majors must email the professor prior to registration for approval.  Class size: 12

 

19388

FILM 322

 Fictionalizing the Biopic

Kelly Reichardt

  W         10:10-1:10 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

This is a live-action class. Concentration will be on the narrative structure of the biopic. As a means of exploring visual storytelling strategies, students will be dramatizing the life of a non-fictional person (or persons). This next semester, the class would be centered on the lives of civil servants/ art collectors Herb and Dorothy Vogel. Concentration is on; visual storytelling, sound design, the three-act formula, narrative tropes, time passage through montage, revealing an interior life through the framing and “blocking” of a scene. Working from the documentary HERB AND DOROTHY, each student will select a portion of the documentary to dramatize. All students will move through the various stages of production: research, storyboarding, casting, location scouting, costume design, set dressing, shooting, sound design and editing. Recommended readings: But Beautiful by Geoff Dyer, The Writing Life by Annie Dillard, In the Blink of an Eye by Walter Murch, and Termite Art vs. White Elephant Art by Manny Farber.  Class size: 12

 

19389

FILM 332

 Avant Garde Film

John Pruitt

  W         1:30-4:30 pm

AVERY 110 / 117

PA

PART

A lecture, survey course devoted to one of the most significant artistic movements in film following World War II, a movement closely tied to art forms like poetry and painting, which thus calls into critical question the medium's normal association with narrative fiction. The course will focus on a relatively small number of major filmmakers: the early pioneers of the 1940s (Deren, Peterson, Menken, and Broughton); the mythopoeic artificers of the 1950's and early 1960's (Anger, Brakhage, and Baillie); and the formalists of the late 1960s, (Frampton, Snow and Gehr). We will also pay attention to the strong graphic/collage cinema of artists like Cornell, Conner, Smith, and Breer as well as to the anarchic, comic improvisations of figures like Jacobs, Kuchar, and MacLaine. We will end in the mid 1970's by touching on the movement's then future prospects, e.g. the revitalization of storytelling through autobiography (Mekas) and feminist/critical narrative (Rainer). Supplementary readings, including many theoretical works by the filmmakers themselves as well as material touching on parallel avant-garde movements in painting, photography, poetry, and music from the same era, works by highly influential artists like Charles Olson, John Cage, et al. Three essays.  Open to non-Film majors. Class size: 14

 

19382

FILM 363

 Defining Black Cinema

Ephraim Asili (J. Weldon)

Screening:

 T           1:30-4:30 pm

 M          7:00-10:00 pm

AVERY 217 / 110

AVERY 110

AA

D+J

AART

DIFF

What constitutes Black Cinema? Perhaps films made by filmmakers’ representative of the African Diaspora or films themed around issues related to cultures of the African Diaspora? Maybe a film that feature Black actors, or a set of formal concerns and approaches that separate Black Cinema from dominant modes of production? Defining Black Cinema is a course designed for students to explore these and related questions of historical representation, cultural identity, stylistic innovation, and alternative modes of distribution. By viewing and responding to a cross section of domestic and international films made by filmmakers of the African Diaspora, students will be provided with a historic and aesthetic basis for defining Black Cinema on their own terms. Some of the Filmmakers covered in the course are Oscar Micheaux, Spencer Williams, Zora Neale Hurston, Eloyce Gist, Ousmane Sembene, Melvin Van Peebles, and Madeline Anderson. Grading for the course will be based on weekly written responses, attendance, and class participation. This course includes a required weekly evening screening. Class size: 14

 

19386

FILM 376

 The Vampire: Blood and Empire

Peggy Ahwesh

Screening:

  W         10:10-1:10 pm

 T           7:00-10:00 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

Perhaps the most enduring figure in the history of cinema, the vampire as a character and cinematic trope, is reinvented and revised with each era as a means to address prevalent fears and desires and as a marker of social change.  A mutable in-between creature, with narratives originating from traditional folklore, gothic lore, teen drama and camp, the vampire offers specific lessons regarding genre, character and style, in addition to a critical analysis of feminism, race, spirituality, genetics and otherness.  This is a production class in which students will compose short videos in response to assigned texts, locations and film fragments during the first half of the semester, and produce an ambitious final project during the second half.  We will screen and discuss recent and historical films by Jarmusch, Amirpour, Rollin, Dreyer and Portabella plus films from the vaults of Universal Pictures, Hammer Films and the Shaw Brothers.  Requirements include: participation in discussions, completion of all assignments, participation on production teams and a successful final project.  A class for film-majors and non-majors with proven cinema skills. Class size: 12

 

19385

FILM 405

 Senior Seminar

Jacqueline Goss

 T           5:00-7:00 pm

AVERY 110 / 217

 

 

A requirement for all Film majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film and carries no credit. (Meets every other week.)  Class size: 25

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

19052

IDEA 135

 games at work: Participation, procedure and play

Keith O’Hara

Ben Coonley

  M   W   1:30 – 4:30 pm

RKC 100

AVERY 333

MC

PA

MATC

PART

Cross-listed: Computer Science; Film and Electronic Arts;  Experimental Humanities 

8 credits This course is an intensive, interdisciplinary investigation of games and their pervasive role in contemporary life. What constitutes a game? Why do people play them? What makes digital games different from non-digital games? What roles do games play in contemporary culture? How have game-like incentive systems and other forms of "gamification" infused non-game contexts, such as social media, fine art, democracy, education, war, and the modern workplace? Do games and "gamer" culture effectively preclude, privilege, include, or exclude certain groups, identities, and worldviews? Course readings, screenings, and mandatory game play will augment and inform our investigation of these questions and beyond. The primary coursework will consist of game creation using tools and methodologies from computer science and electronic art. Students will create original games (non-digital and digital video games), both independently and in groups. This work will be augmented by short assignments designed to build fluency in visual art creation and interactive game design through short exercises in coding in Javascript, visual design applications, and game design software. Assignments will push students to develop experimental and critical approaches to game creation. This course is restricted to students in the lower college. Students with little experience playing games and/or a healthy skepticism about the cultural and artistic value of games are encouraged to apply. No prerequisites. Application procedure: Email bcoonley@bard.edu and kohara@bard.edu one paragraph (no more than 100 words) explaining your interest in taking this course. Class size: 16

 

19482

HR 333

 Pax Americana in the Movies

Ian Buruma

M           1:30-4:30 pm

Sun        6:00-9:00 pm

HDR 106

PRE 110

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Film and Electronic Arts