92179

FILM 106

 Intro to Documentary

Edward Halter

                Screening:

   Th       1:30 -4:30 pm

  W         7:00 -10:00 pm

AVERY 110

PRE 110

AA

AART

An introductory historical survey of the documentary, from the silent era to the digital age. Topics addressed will include the origins of the concept of the documentary, direct cinema and cinema verite, propaganda, ethnographic media, the essay film, experimental documentary forms, media activism, fiction and documentary, and the role of changing technologies. Filmmakers studied will include Flaherty, Vertov, Riefenstahl, Rouch, Pennebaker, Maysles, Wiseman, Marker, Farocki, Spheeris, Hara, Riggs,Honigman, Morris, and Moore. Grades will be based on exams, essays and other research and writing projects. Open to all students, registration priority for First-Year students and film majors.  Class size: 25

 

92168

FILM 109

 Aesthetics of Film

Richard Suchenski

                Screening:

 T  Th    10:10 -11:30 am

W   begins @  6:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Designed for first-year students, this course will offer a broad, historically-grounded survey of film aesthetics internationally. Key elements of film form will be addressed through close analysis of important films by directors such as Griffith, Eisenstein, Dreyer, Hitchcock, von Sternberg, Rossellini, Powell, Bresson, Brakhage, Godard, Tarkovsky, and Denis, the reading of important critical or theoretical texts, and discussions of central issues in the other arts.  Midterm exam, two short papers, and final exam. Open to all students, registration priority for First-Year students and film majors.   Class size: 25

 

92164

FILM 113

 History of Film: Silent Era

John Pruitt

                  Screening:

M           1:30 -4:30 pm

Su             6:00 -9:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

 

AART

A lecture survey course that traces the medium of film as an art form from its origins to the end of the silent era. An emphasis will be placed on particularly prominent "schools" of filmmaking: The American Silent Comedy, German Expressionism, The Soviet and European Avant-gardes. The long list of film artists to be screened and studied include: the Lumiere Brothers, George Melies, D.W. Griffith, Lois Weber, Germaine Dulac, Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Yasujiro Ozu, Carl Dreyer, Fernand Leger, Luis Bunuel, Man Ray, Erich von Stroheim, F. W. Murnau, Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. Readings will consist mostly of classic aesthetic studies from the era itself, those by Eisenstein, Vertov, Munsterberg, Arnheim, et al. Course is limited to First-Year students only and is highly recommended for (but not restricted to) those students who are contemplating film as a major course of study. Two essay exams and a term paper.  Class size: 25

 

92166

FILM 207 A

 Electronic Media Workshop

Ben Coonley

 T           10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

This course is designed to introduce students to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation.  The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student.  To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize students with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Adobe Premiere, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

92169

FILM 207 B

 Electronic Media Workshop

TBA

 T           1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

See above.  Class size: 12

 

92165

FILM 208

 Introduction to 16mm Film

Ephraim Asili

(Justin Weldon )

M           1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PA

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.   Class size: 12

 

92173

FILM 217

 The Essay Film

Peggy Ahwesh

                Screening:

  W         1:30 -4:30 pm

 T           7:00 -10:00 pm

AVERY 333

 PRE 110

AA

AART

Galvanized by the intersection of personal rumination, research and the investigation of history, the essay film has been a major stylistic force in nonfiction film production since the 1950's.  The form traditionally includes the 'voice' of the maker and operates on multiple discursive levels of political argumentation, intellectual inquiry, social engagement and artistic innovation.  Makers to be discussed range from Alain Renais and Agnes Varda to Eric Baudelaire and Laura Poitras. Students are required to write short response papers to weekly screenings and complete an ambitious final project.Class size: 15

 

92178

FILM 223

 Graphic Film Workshop

Brent Green

   Th       1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

This course explores the materials and processes available for the production of graphic film or graphic film sequences. It consists of instruction in animation, rephotography, rotoscoping, and drawing on film and of viewing and discussing a number of films that are primarily concerned with the visual.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

92163

FILM 235

 Video Installation

Ben Coonley

M           1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

This production course investigates video installation as an evolving contemporary art form that extends the conversation of video art beyond the frame and into live, hybrid media, site-specific, and multiple channel environments. Presentations, screenings, and readings augment critical thinking about temporal and spatial relationships, narrative structure, viewer perception and the challenges of presenting time-based work in a gallery or museum setting. Workshops hone technical skills and problem solving. Students develop research interests and apply their unique skills sets to short turnaround exercises and more expanded self-directed projects for gallery and non-theatrical contexts.  Class size: 12

 

92174

FILM 249

 International Film Noir

Richard Suchenski

                Screening:

  W         1:30 -4:30 pm

 T  begins @  7:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Art History  This course provides an exploration of film noir as a genuinely international form.  We will look intensively at a number of key noir films made in America, Britain, France, Italy, and Japan during World War II and the postwar era, with a focus on visual style and the way in which these atmospheric, morally ambiguous crime dramas are related to, and comment upon, developments in the larger culture.  Attention will be paid to the roots of film noir in the visual arts (especially photography) and hard-boiled fiction, its changes over the course of the 1940s and 1950s, and its influence on subsequent filmmaking.  Readings include novels and short stories as well as a range of essays about film noir and postwar culture.  Directors studied include Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, Nicholas Ray, Billy Wilder, Fritz Lang, and Henri-Georges Clouzot.  We will also examine contemporary art movements such as Abstract Expressionism and the work of photographers such as Brassai and Weegee.  Three short papers and a final research essay.  Film and Art History majors will have priority.  Class size: 14

 

92175

FILM 256

 Writing the Film

TBA

  Th        10:10 - 1:10 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts  An introductory writing course that looks at creative approaches to writing short films and dialogue scenes. There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques. The course will focus on researching and developing ideas and structure for stories, building characters, poetic strategies and writing comedic, realistic and awkward romantic dialogue.  Class size: 12

 

92181

FILM 259

 Documentary in Residence

TBA

    F        1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 333

 

 

Cross-listed: Human Rights An introductory video production course for students interested in social issues, reportage, home movies, travelogues and other forms of the non-fiction film.  Instructed by the Film and Electronic Arts Program's Documentary Company in Residence. No prerequisites. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

92176

FILM 290

 Narrative Film Workshop

TBA

   W        1:30 - 4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

Students will explore visual storytelling strategies. Through weekly video exercises students will shoot original assignments or excerpts from selected narrative films. They will work both individually and on crews. For crew assignments members of the class will act as a production team: planning, shooting and editing. Crewmembers should rotate positions so that everyone is getting the chance to experience the various areas of filmmaking. Students will construct a sound design for each piece but must refrain from using music.  No titles or credits. All work must be precise. There are no non-decisions.  Class size: 12

 

92167

FILM 302

 Advanced 16mm Workshop

Ephraim Asili

(Justin Weldon)

 T           10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 319

PA

PART

This course is designed to build on the technical and theoretical concepts introduced in Introduction to 16mm film.  Students will explore special effects using a bolex camera, how to hand process film, shoot sync sound film with an Arriflex SRII camera, and optically print film. In addition to learning about advanced cameras and techniques, students will also have the opportunity to shoot color film, work on collaborative projects, and participate in screenings and discussions that illustrate and exemplify the approaches taught in class. Prerequisites: Introduction to 16mm Film and one film history course.  Class size: 10

 

92180

FILM 324

 Seminar: Science Fiction Film

Edward Halter

                  Screening:

    F        10:10 -1:10 pm

 Th         7:00 -10:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology and Society  A critical examination of science fiction film from the silent era to today, with a special focus on the relationship between science fiction and the avant-garde. Readings include essays by Susan Sontag, Parker Tyler, Annette Michelson, Vivian Sobchak, Jean Baudrillard, and Scott Bukatman, as well as representative fiction by J. G. Ballard, Ursula Le Guin, Hugo Gernsback, Bruce Sterling, Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, and others. Topics include: visualizing technology, gender and sexuality; alien and robot as human countertype; futurism, utopia and dystopia; Cold War and post-Cold War politics as seen through science fiction; camp and parody; the depiction of consciousness and interior states; abstraction, special effects, and the sublime; counterfactuals and alternative history; the poetics of science fiction language. Past coursework in film is required.   Class size: 14

 

92308

FILM 307

 LANDSCAPE AND MEDIA

Peggy Ahwesh

 T           1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

This class is an investigation of both the natural and manufactured landscapes of the Hudson Valley through a variety of site visits as documented through the lens of our digital camera.  We will visit locations to observe and shoot and also, when in the classroom, study the history of landscape as expressed by painters, writers, video artists and filmmakers. We will consider environmental issues, the social uses of land and parks, travel and tourism and more generally, the politics of place. A broad range of tools and techniques will be introduced, such as: panoramas, mapping, image archives, drones, creative geography, 360 degree cams and others. Students are required to complete short videos every couple of weeks in response to local site visits and regular attendance is mandatory. Our travels will involve time outside of class, so please be flexible. Class size: 12

 

92170

FILM 339

 Cinematic Naturalism in the

West and Its Literary Roots

John Pruitt

                Screening:

 T           1:30 -4:30 pm

 M          6:00 -9:00 pm

AVERY 117

AVERY 110

AA

AART

The seminar course will survey a number of major, highly influential films from the 1920's to the 1970's that bear a strong relationship to realism/naturalism: works by Griffith, Seastrom, Stroheim, Vidor, Kirsanoff, Renoir, Rossellini, deSica, Visconti, Olmi, Reisz, MacKenzie, Cassavetes, Loach, Burnett, et al.  In addition we will take the time to explore a selection of important literary works that will help us understand the complexity and depth of naturalism: George Eliot's Adam Bede, Emile Zola's Germinal, Thomas Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd, Theodor Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Maxim Gorky's The Lower Depths, Gerhart Hauptmann's The Weavers, Giovanni Verga'sI Malavoglia, Halldor Laxness's Independent People, and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. There will be supplementary reading of key works of literary and cinematic criticism that pertain to the theory of art and realism. Writing assignments include a class journal and a twenty-page term paper. Juniors and Seniors only.  Class size: 15

 

92172

FILM 364

 Personal Narratives II

Charles Burnett

Lisa Katzman

                 Screening:

W           10:10 -1:10 pm  

 

Th          5:00 - 7:00 pm

AVERY 117

AVERY 110

PA

PART

Personal Narratives Part II is a continuation Personal Narratives Part I, in which students wrote a short screenplay with the intention of making it into a film.  In Part II, students will direct and edit short dramatic films and study the directing styles of several filmmakers, including Cassavetes, Dash, Jarmusch, Akerman,and Burnett. Workshops will focus on blocking, directing actors, and editing. A polished short screenplay is a pre-requisite for this course and enrollment priority will be given to students who have completed Personal Narrative Part I. Students who haven’t taken Personal Narratives Part I are required to submit a short screenplay by May 6th. Please email submissions to lkatzman@bard.edu Class size: 12

 

92171

FILM 405

 Senior Seminar

Ephraim Asili

(Justin Weldon )

 T           5:00 -6:59 pm

AVERY 110 / 217

 

 

A requirement for all Film majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film and carries no credit. (Meets every other week.)  Class size: 25