18335

FILM 116

 History of Cinema since 1945

Richard Suchenski

                      Screening:

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

W  begins @  6:00 pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

Designed for first year students, this course (the second part of a two-part survey) will address the history of cinema since the end of the Second World War, In addition to offering an interdisciplinary look at the development and significance of the cinema during this period, we will consider the nature and function of film form through lectures, discussions, the reading of key texts, and close study of works by exemplary directors such as Rossellini, Hitchcock, Brakhage, Bresson, Tati, Resnais, Godard, Bergman, Kurosawa, Tarkovsky, Kubrick, Fassbinder and Hou.  Special focus will be paid to film's relationship to related arts and to the larger history of culture.  Attendance and participation is assumed and there will be a midterm exam, two short papers, and a final examination.  Class size: 25

 

18336

FILM 130 A

 Praxis

Ben Coonley

 T        10:10 am-1:10 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

2-credits  This is a production course designed for first-year students intending to concentrate in Film and Electronic Arts. The course will cover the basics of video production: camera operation, lighting, sound recording, and editing. Participants will each produce one final project utilizing the techniques covered in class. Designed for students with no prior video production experience. Pre-requisite: one film history course. The course will meet every other Tuesday for the full semester. Class size: 12

 

18337

FILM 130 B

 Praxis

Ben Coonley

 T        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

See above. The course will meet every other Tuesday for the full semester.  Class size: 12

 

18338

FILM 167

 Survey of Electronic Art

Edward Halter

      Screening:

    F     10:10 am-1:10 pm

  W      7:00 pm-10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 217

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities; Science, Technology, Society  Open to First-year students only. An introductory lecture course on the history of moving-image art made with electronic media, from the earliest computer-generated films, through television, the portable video camera, the internet, and gaming. Topics include analog versus digital, guerrilla television, expanded cinema, feminist media, video and performance, internet art, video installation, and the question of video games as art. Requirements include two short essays and a final in-class exam or final research paper.  Class size: 25

 

18339

FILM 207

 Electronic Media Workshop

Justin Weldon

(Ephraim Asili)

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

This course is designed to introduce you to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation.  The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student.  To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize you with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Adobe Premiere, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.   Class size: 12

 

18340

FILM 208

 Introduction to 16mm Film

Justin Weldon

(Ephraim Asili)

M         1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PA

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.   Class size: 14

 

18551

FILM 225

 3D Animation

Ben Coonley

M         1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities  In this course, students are introduced to processes for creating moving image artworks using 3D animation software and its ancillary technologies. Topics include: the basics of 3D modeling and animation, 3D scanning, and creative use of other technologies that allow artists to combine real and virtual spaces. Weekly readings reflect on the psychological, cultural, and aesthetic impacts of the increasingly prevalent use of computer-generated imagery in contemporary media. Students are not assumed to have any previous experience with 3D animation. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

18861

FILM 229

CHARACTER AND STORY

Lisa Krueger

M         1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

An introductory screenwriting course that focuses on writing character-driven short pieces.  There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques.  The course will cover story structure and story design in relationship to character development.  The students will complete a short character study screenplay. No prerequisites.   Class size: 12

 

18343

FILM 237

 Film Blackness and Black Aesthetic in contemporary cinema

Justin Weldon

(Ephraim Asili)

                    Screenings:

 T        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

 M             6:00 pm   9:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 217

AA

D+J

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies   This course is an exploration of the philosophy of black aesthetics in relation to the concept of film blackness. Screenings and discussions will focus on films made between 1980-2017 with an emphasis on films made by members of the African Diaspora.   Special attention will be given to films that focus on formal innovation as a means of addressing socio- political issues. Directors studied include Cheryl Dunye, Barry Jenkins, Ava Duvernay, Steve McQueen, Kevin Jerome Everson, Abderrahmane Sissako, Jordan Peele, Raoul Peck, Barbara McCullough, and John Akomfrah. Writers studied include bell hooks, Toni Cade Bambara, and Michael Boyce Gillespie. Students will be required to write weekly responses. Class size: 15

 

18342

FILM 278

 Documentary Production Workshop: BIG NOISE

Richard Rowley

Jacqueline Rowley

    F     1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

A video production workshop for students interested in social issues, reportage, home movies, travelogues and other forms of the non-fiction film. Working in both small crews and individually, the students will travel locally to a variety of locations to cover particular events, people and natural phenomena.  A final project, that is researched, shot and edited during the second half of the semester, is required of each student.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

18348

FILM 313

 Rule Breakers

Lisa Krueger

 T        10:10 am-1:10 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

In this live-action production workshop, students will study conventions of narrative filmmaking related to shot composition, screen direction, the actor's gaze, continuity, chronology, sound design and more. Students will shoot and edit several scenes/sequences in which they will alternately follow, bend and break these rules to serve various storytelling ends. The goal is for students to become more fluent in the foundational vocabulary of the art form, while developing their own cinematic voice. .Class size: 12

 

18572

FILM 317

FILM PRODUCTION: CINEMATOGRAPHY

Jacqueline Goss

 T        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PA

PART

A junior level production workshop designed to give students working in film and video a more thorough understanding of a wide range of cinematic vocabularies and aesthetics. Students will be required to finish short projects that will explore the qualities of film and video through extensive in-class exploration of film stocks, different lenses, shutter speeds, lighting techniques and cinematographic strategies for different genres of filmmaking. Class size: 12

 

18349

FILM 321

 Harun Farocki: Inextinguishable Fire

Peggy Ahwesh

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Human Rights  An upper level history seminar that will study the ground breaking and influential oeuvre of German filmmaker, teacher and essayist Harun Farocki. Active from the mid 60's to his death in 2014, Farocki produced a significant body of work that analyzed the workings of contemporary image production and optical technologies in a critique of the apparatus of state and corporate power within the global economy. Using both new and unique archival material, Farocki unpacks post-industrial machine-vision with examples from high-tech warfare, video games, surveillance, production simulation and everyday consumerism. Required evening screenings include the films of Farocki plus related works by Vertov, Steyerl, Ujica, Paglen, Godard, Export and Bitomsky. Texts by Antje Ehmann, Thomas Elsaesser, Paul Virilio, Kaja Silverman, Thomas Keenan and Thomas Y. Levin will be discussed. Students are required to write several short response papers throughout the semester, do an in-class presentation and a final research paper based on issues raised in the class. Class size: 15

 

18345

FILM 337

 Queer Cinema

Edward Halter

             Screening:

   Th    1:30 pm-4:30 pm

  Th     7:00 pm-10:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AA

AART

This course presents a critical examination of how queer identity has been explored on screen, from the silent era to recent times. Topics will include: the representation of gay, lesbian, bisexual and trans characters in classic Hollywood and European cinema; theories of camp, gender subversion, and other forms of articulating queer sensibility within historically heteronormative frameworks; the question of "positive images" and identity politics; the pioneering work of openly queer 20th century filmmakers; the role of cinema in activism around such issues as AIDS, feminism, and trans visibility; the central importance of queer artists in the history of avant-garde film and video art; and the mainstreaming of queer images in the 21st century. Filmmakers under consideration will include Chantal Akerman, Kenneth Anger, Dorothy Arzner, Sadie Benning, Jean Cocteau, George Cukor, Arthur Dong, Cheryl Dunye, Barbara Hammer, Todd Haynes, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Su Friedrich, George & Mike Kuchar, Derek Jarman, Ulrike Ottinger, Yvonne Rainer, James Richards, João Pedro Rodrigues, Marlon Riggs, Werner Schroeter, Ryan Trecartin, Andy Warhol, John Waters, and Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Class size: 15

 

18346

FILM 358

 Auteur Studies: andrzej wajda and the cinemas of central europe

Richard Suchenski

                     Screening:

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

M     begins @ 6:00 pm

AVERY 110

AA

AART

In this seminar, we will undertake a comparative study of major directors, with the focus and theme changing each time the course is offered. This time, the primary subject is filmmaker Andrzej Wajda, whose rich body of work has become a paradigm for international art cinema. Among other things, we will examine the histories of the major cinemas of Central Europe (Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary); their relationship to artistic, theatrical, and literary movements (including Romanticism, Expressionism, and Surrealism); the links between major Central European auteurs; and their influence on subsequent generations, with a special focus on film style, cinematic adaptation, and representations of historical experience. In addition to studying many of Wajda's features, we will watch films by directors such as Krzysztof Kieslowski, Krzysztof Zanussi, Milos Forman, Vera Chytilova, Miklos Jancso, and Bela Tarr. We will read a range of relevant criticism, along with contextual material and literary works by figures such as Czeslaw Milosz, Wislawa Szymborska, Milan Kundera, and Laszlo Krasznahorkai. Grades based on in-class discussion, short writing assignments, and a final research essay. Upper-college students who have taken courses in film criticism and history will have priority.  Class size: 12

 

18574

FILM 364

 PERSONAL NARRATIVES

Charles Burnett

Lisa Katzman

   W    10:10 am- 1:10 pm

AVERY 217

AA

AART

This course will explore the process of how to form a narrative film around personal experience.  An examination of Charles Burnett's films will provide a touchstone for exploring a multitude of approaches to this question, such as: autobiography, observations of one's social environment, and the use of a literary work as source material for the development of a personal narrative rather than the basis of a strict adaptation. The course will illuminate how everyday experiences and often overlooked interactions become the material of narrative film art. Structured as a screenwriting workshop, students will write a short screenplay during the course of the semester that grows out of their individual experiences, observations, and/or a range of influences, including literary works and historical experiences they feel personally impacted by.  In the following semester, they will direct and edit their screenplays. 

Class size: 12

 

18350

FILM 405

 Senior Seminar

Peggy Ahwesh

 T        5:00 pm-7:00 pm

AVERY 110

 

 

A requirement for all Film majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film and carries no credit. (Meets every other week.) Class size: 35