EUS has required courses as well as recommended courses by Focus Area. To see how the courses below fit into EUS Focus Areas and satisfy EUS course requirements (new feature), please visit: http://eus.bard.edu/requirements/

 

18850

EUS 101

 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL & URBAN STUDY

Michele Dominy

M  W   3:10 pm   4:30 pm

OLIN 204

SA

SSCI

An introduction to key themes and fields that addresses environmental and urban questions. While disentangling and analyzing the terms used to describe aspects of the environment nature/culture, human/nonhuman, wilderness, urbanism, countryside, and the city this interdisciplinary course considers issues such as environmental justice, biodiversity preservation, protected natural areas, infrastructure, agricultural and food sustainability, ecotourism, climate change, and development. The course is organized around four ways that humans relate to their environments: observing, organizing and classifying, collecting and distributing, and conserving. Under the rubric of each category, students will become familiar with various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches represented in the EUS curriculum (such as anthropology, cultural geography, environmental literature and history, modeling and statistics, natural history, political ecology, sociology, spatial analysis, and urban economics), while engaging with their methods. EUS 101 and EUS 102 are required courses for moderation into EUS. Class size: 22

 

18047

EUS 102

 Introduction to Environmental & Urban Science

Robyn Smyth

            LAB:

 T        8:30 am-11:30 am

      Th     8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 101

RKC 111 / 112

LS

SCI

This course offers an integrated exploration of the science underlying environmental issues. The primary objective is to provide students with a systems-oriented understanding of biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that affect earth, air, water, and life. Students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamental scientific principles governing environmental systems including the cycling of matter and the flow of energy. By practicing the application of these scientific concepts, students will develop their ability to think critically about the potential outcomes of complex environmental issues. Local and global examples of elemental cycling, hydrology, ecology, agriculture, urbanization, and climate change will be used. This class will include some local field trips and outdoor data collection which may require longer class meeting times on Tuesdays specifically.  Class size: 18

 

18469

EUS 203

 Geographic Information Systems

Susan Winchell-Sweeney

    F     9:30 am-12:00 pm

HDR 101A

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Sociology   2 credits  Students will explore the various spatial analysis methods used by scientists, planners, and public-policy makers to improve the understanding and management of our world. Students will learn the fundamentals of modeling, data analysis and mapping using geospatial technologies. Practical exercises relate to themes studied throughout the year. In this project-based class, students begin by learning the fundamentals of using spatial information, conducting spatial analysis, and producing and interpreting maps. In the second half of the course, they apply these skills to a team-based research project of their own design. The program culminates in a poster session, where the students show their work to their peers, professors in the program, and the greater Bard community. Class size: 5

 

18363

EUS 205

 Planetary ConseqUENCES OF Food ProductION

Gidon Eshel

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 106

MC

MATC

"Can one produce local, organic food with relative environmental impunity?"  Life cycle analyses show that  on a national average level transportation is relatively unimportant in the overall environmental footprint of food production. While this may cast serious doubt on the "local food" notion, the picture may change significantly when organic food production is addressed because of the absence of environmentally adverse agrochemicals from the organic life cycle. In the northeast, vegetable production must be housed in environmentally demanding greenhouses in the winter months. In this course, we strive to  answer the question above quantitatively, using an on-campus innovatively designed greenhouse. This is a practicum course, with out of class and weekend participation, which emulates (in miniature) a commercial setting. Preference will be give to juniors and seniors from all fields of study with scientific and math skills in manipulating numbers, with no more than addition and multiplication of numbers. Class size: 10

 

18048

EUS 222

 AIR

Elias Dueker

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

        F 1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 112

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Biology   This course offers a detailed exploration of the earth's atmosphere and its interactions with the biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere with a strong emphasis on climate change. Topics will include origins of the atmosphere, origins of life, anthropogenic influences on the atmosphere, and connections and exchanges with the hydrologic cycle. We will further explore pressing global environmental issues associated with the atmosphere: climate change (extreme weather events, shifting precipitation patterns), air pollution, acid rain and recovery, and depletion of the ozone layer. Lab work will be guided by scientific questions related to these issues, and will focus on detection of anthropogenic influence on air quality.  Specifically, students will manipulate models to conduct field sampling, and utilize microbiological and chemical assays in the lab to better understand sources for and tracking of contaminants in air and the implications for people.  Class size: 16

 

18575

EUS 226

ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING

Gautam Sethi

  T  Th     3:10 pm   4:30 pm

HDR 106

MA

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics; Mathematics.  Related interest: Biology  This course will expose students to a variety of modeling techniques used in environmental decision-making. The inclusion of these techniques in this course is motivated by their relevance in generating useful answers to current policy issues. For example, how rapidly should the switch to renewable energy generation be made? The answer to this question depends on, in part, the rapidity with which fossil fuels are being depleted. This course will introduce the concept of peak oil and use statistical methods to estimate the timing of peak global crude oil production. As another illustration, international development agencies have introduced new varieties of rice in Laos in a bid to make rice yields less susceptible to climate change. The impact of this intervention on livelihoods of small landholders, however, is uncertain due to inherent fluctuations in many factors such as the market price of rice. In this course, we will use data collected by the UNDP to conduct a Monte Carlo simulation and develop a probabilistic answer to this issue. Other examples of relevant policy issues discussed in this course include developing simple predator-prey models to predict changes in populations of keystone species, and modeling the sustainability of fisheries under various regulations of regional fisheries councils in the United States. Students are expected to have some basic knowledge of regression analysis and be proficient in Calculus I. While it is desirable that students have some prior coding experience, the course will begin with a three-week primer on MATLAB programming. Prerequisite: MATH 141, Calculus I  Class size: 22

 

18506

EUS 308

EUS Practicum: Culture through Nature: landscape, environment and design into the 21st century

Margie Ruddick

M         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HDR 106

AA

AART

This course expands on the Fall 2017 course Art Through Nature:  Landscape, Environment and Design in America, from the perspective of landscape planning and design.   We will take the study of the relationship between nature and culture into the 21st century, looking deeply at the way we make sense of sites, questioning conventional conceptions, methods and processes that can distance the actor from the landscape. We will work together to arrive at ways of taking in, reading, and organizing the landscape that disregard the artificial boundaries between art, ecology and design. We will integrate the many disciplines   science, ecology, sociology   that make up the field of landscape architecture and have in the past decades come to the foreground as agents in design. The first half of the semester will be spent developing a practice of site readings, from literal readings to mapping to bioacoustical recordings and other methods of documentation and interpretation.  The second half will be spent studying and immersing ourselves in Montgomery Place from many perspectives, preparing a series of readings of existing systems and conditions as well as future uses, and addressing the need to adapt landscapes for new stewards, new inhabitants and visitors, and new ages. Upper College status. Class size: 15

 

18505

EUS 311

 Climate & Agroecology

Jennifer Phillips

M  W  10:10 am-11:40 am

ALBEE 102

SA

SSCI

In this course we will examine the linkages between agroecosystems and the climate system. We begin by looking at projections for climate change impacts on crop production, with a focus on crop simulation models, their applications and limitations. We then look at expectations for the influence of elevated CO 2 on yield, and controversies involved. We then turn to a discussion of the role that agriculture can play in climate change mitigation, given the large greenhouse gas emissions associated with farming systems. This takes us to an in-depth discussion of soil carbon management, and trade-offs between emissions from various reductions strategies. Finally, we will investigate the various strategies being put forth regarding climate change adaptation, including the role of genetically modified crops, biodiversity, and system resilience, with major implications for future food production. This is a graduate course offered to a limited number of undergraduates. Interested students should contact Eban Goodstein.  Class size: 10

 

18049

EUS 316

 Waste

Elias Dueker

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

    W    1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 112

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Biology This course takes a close look at the long-term implications of our standard approaches to handling human waste. Innovations in waste treatment are required as we rapidly reach saturation, resulting in increased air and water pollution and decreasing space for land fills. Students in this class will learn the science behind current waste treatment technology (water, air, and land-based) and be exposed to cutting-edge alternative approaches (water reclamation, living machines, etc.).  Lab work will be microbiological and field-based, and will allow students to become familiar with the bacteria and biogeochemical processes we rely on for most current and cutting-edge waste-treatment approaches. This class will include engagement with local and regional communities and will include joint classroom and field experiences with Prof. Ellen Driscoll's ART206 Sculpture II:  Fluid Dynamics class.  Prerequisites: Either  EUS 221, EUS 222, BIO 202, or permission of instructor.   Class size: 16

 

18367

EUS 322

 The Politics of Solutions

Monique Segarra

M         2:00 pm-4:20 pm

HEG 201

SA

SSCI

Innovative solutions to mitigating and adapting to climate change are emerging at a rapid pace, from the private and public sector, non-governmental organizations, research institutions and not least, from individuals and communities. China and other global economies have made domestic as well as international commitments to moving to a low carbon economy. Despite the withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Agreement, innovations continue supported by sub-national governments and the private sector. This class will examine a range of climate solutions whose viability, in addition to their technological or economic cost, is shaped by ideas, interests, and institutions that facilitate or impede their moving onto policy agendas or to large-scale adoption. The course will consider solutions that include renewable energy technologies, urban planning, land use management and changing individual and social behaviors. In particular, we will be focusing on three key concepts, innovation, social learning and knowledge management as the threads that tie together the differing subject matter we address this semester. Cases are drawn from the United States but also include innovations in China, South Korea and Latin America.  Class size: 15

 

18526

EUS 410

 Climate Change and Water Resources

Robyn Smyth

    F     10:10 am-12:30 pm

HEG 102

SA

SSCI

Climate change is altering the global hydrologic cycle and impacting aquatic ecosystems and water resources available for human use. This course will draw upon the physical science of hydrology, the biological science of ecosystem ecology, and the social science of water resource management to build interdisciplinary understanding of complex climate-ecological-social systems related to water. In the first section we'll examine relationships and feedbacks between the climate system and aquatic ecosystems through the carbon cycle. In the second section we'll look at agricultural-related water resources issues exacerbated by climate change. The third section will explore the water-energy nexus. Finally, we'll consider water supply challenges in an urbanizing world with ever more people.  Class size: 20

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18371

ANTH 212

 Historical Archaeology

Christopher Lindner

  W      4:40 pm-6:00 pm

  F       1:30 pm-5:00 pm

HEG 201

Excavation site

HA

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Historical Studies

 

18360

ANTH 252

 The Animal in Anthropology

Yuka Suzuki

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 205

SA

D+J

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18578

ANTH 324

 Doing Ethnography:  Fieldwork and Representation

Michele Dominy

   Th    10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 202

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

18212

ART 208 KB

 Drawing II:Drawing from Nature

Kenneth Buhler

 T        10:10 am-1:10 pm

FISHER 149

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18220

ART 205 ED

 Sculpture II: Air, Earth, Water

Ellen Driscoll

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

FISHER 142

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies 

 

18199

ARTH 210

 Roman Art and Architecture

Diana DePardo-Minsky

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Italian Studies

 

18504

ARTH 307

 Contested Spaces

Olga Touloumi

  W      10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights  

 

18194

ARTH 375

 Mexican Muralism

Susan Aberth

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies, Human Rights, Latin American Studies 

 

18516

BGIA 301

 Core Seminar

James Ketterer

            -

 

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

18034

BIO 111

 Microbes in the Environment

Brooke Jude

            LAB:

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

T         9:00 am-11:30 am

RKC 115

RKC 111 / 112

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18036

BIO 118

 Conservation Biology

Emily Pollina

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

W        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 115

RKC 114

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18038

BIO 153

 Global Change Biology

Bruce Robertson

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

M         8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 115

RKC  114 / 115

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global Public Health

 

18041

BIO 202

 Ecology and Evolution

Felicia Keesing

  W  F  8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18040

BIO 244

 Biostatistics

Arseny Khakhalin

  W  F  1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 111

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global Public Health; Mathematics

 

18045

BIO 311

 Field Ornithology

Bruce Robertson

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

F         8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 115

RKC 112

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18384

ECON 202

 Intermediate Macroeconomics

L. Randall Wray

M  W  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

LEVY

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

18385

ECON 203

 Game Theory

Aniruddha Mitra

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

ALBEE 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

18387

ECON 229

 Introduction to Econometrics

Sanjaya DeSilva

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

ALBEE 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

18880

ECON 237

 ECONOMICS OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR

TBA

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEGEMAN 308

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies 

 

18386

ECON 242

 Ecological Economics

Kris Feder

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

ALBEE 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18388

ECON 321

 SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC Development

Sanjaya DeSilva

 T        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18446

GIS 102

 Global & Int'l Studies:Climate

Michelle Murray

 T        4:40 pm-7:00 pm

RKC 103

SA

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Political Studies

 

18402

HIST 220

 Famine

Alice Stroup

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 107

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

18400

HIST 280

 American Environmental History

Holger Droessler

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 202

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18415

HIST 319

 The Suburban Ideal

Myra Armstead

   Th    1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 306

HA

D+J

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18416

HIST 328

 Jewish New York, 1881-1924

Cecile Kuznitz

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HEG 201

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Jewish Studies

 

18410

HIST 2308

 China's Environment

Robert Culp

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 203

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

18101

IDEA 130

 Chernobyl: Man-made Disaster

Matthew Deady

Jonathan Becker

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

 W       10:10 am-12:10 pm

HEG 201

HEG 107

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Political Studies; Russian & Eurasian Studies; Science   6 credits  

 

18528

IDEA 215

 OF Utopias

Kevin Duong

Olga Touloumi

 T Th   10:10am-12:30pm

HEG 204

AA

SA

AART

SSCI

Cross-listed: Art History, Environmental & Urban Studies, Experimental Humanities, Political Studies

6 credits 

 

18522

IDEA 210

 PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Causes AND Consequences OF Migration

Aniruddha Mitra

Peter Rosenblum

 T  Th 1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

18158

LIT 258

 American Literature II

Elizabeth Frank

  W Th     10:10 am-11:30 am

ASP 302

LA

D+J

ELIT

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18159

LIT 259

 American Literature III

Peter L'Official

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 101

LA

D+J

ELIT

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18421

PHIL 140

 Other Animals

Jay Elliott

M  W  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 101

MBV

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

18462

SOC 205

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

HDR 101A

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18466

SOC 320

 Environment & Society from  a Global Perspct

Valeria Bonatti

    F     11:00 am-1:20 pm

OLIN 201

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

18468

SOC 333

 Qualitative Research Practicum

Allison McKim

 T        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

18327

WRIT 244

 Imagining Nonhuman Consciousns

Benjamin Hale

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

HEG 201

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights