EUS has required courses as well as recommended courses by Focus Area. To see how the courses below fit into EUS Focus Areas and

satisfy EUS course requirements, please visit: eus.bard.edu/program/requirements/

 

92104

EUS 101

 Intro to EnvironMENTAL & Urban Studies

Monique Segarra

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

An introduction to key themes and fields that addresses environmental and urban questions. While disentangling and analyzing the terms used to describe aspects of the environment—nature/culture, human/nonhuman, wilderness, urbanism, countryside, and the city—this interdisciplinary course considers issues such as environmental justice, biodiversity preservation, protected natural areas, infrastructure, agricultural and food sustainability, ecotourism, climate change, and development. The course is organized around four ways that humans relate to their environments: observing, organizing and classifying, collecting and distributing, and conserving. Under the rubric of each category, students will become familiar with various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches represented in the EUS curriculum (such as anthropology, cultural geography, environmental literature and history, modeling and statistics, natural history, political ecology, sociology, spatial analysis, and urban economics), while engaging with their methods. EUS 101 and     EUS 102 are required courses for moderation into EUS. Class size: 22

91894

EUS 102

 Intro TO EnvironMENTAL SYSTEM Science

Robyn Smyth

 T           1:30-4:30 pm

F            1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 112

LS

SCI

This course offers an integrated exploration of the science underlying environmental issues. The primary objective is to provide students with a systems-oriented understanding of biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that affect earth, air, water, and life. Students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamental scientific principles governing environmental systems including the cycling of matter and the flow of energy. By practicing the application of these scientific concepts, students will develop their ability to think critically about the potential outcomes of complex environmental issues. Local and global examples of elemental cycling, hydrology, ecology, agriculture, urbanization, and climate change will be used. This class will include some local field trips and outdoor data collection which may require longer class meeting times on Tuesdays specifically.  Class size: 20

 

92105

EUS 215

 Food Systems: Human HEALTH AND EnvIRONMENTAL HEAlth

Kris Feder

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

ALBEE 106

SA

SSCI

This course examines the association between human health and environmental health, with a particular focus on the links between the “diseases of civilization” and industrial agriculture. First, we review what nutrition science has discovered about the role of diet in human health and disease. Second, we study how agriculture, especially industrial agriculture, has impacted both human health and environmental quality. Third, we survey appropriate technologies for reforming our food systems toward less destructive and more sustainable methods of food production. Finally, we survey political and policy obstacles that stand in the way of reform. Readings include: Lindeberg, Food and Western Disease: Health and Nutrition from an Evolutionary Perspective; Shiva, The Violence of Green Revolution; Scott, Against the Grain: How Agriculture Has Hijacked Civilization; Imhoff, Food Fight: The Citizen’s Guide to a Food and Farm Bill; and Nestle, Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health. Prerequisite: EUS 101.

Class size: 22

 

91896

EUS 222

 AIR

Elias Dueker

   LAB:

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

M           1:30-4:30 pm

HEG 106

RKC 112

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Biology This course offers a detailed exploration of the earth’s atmosphere and its interactions with the biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere with a strong emphasis on climate change. Topics will include origins of the atmosphere, origins of life, anthropogenic influences on the atmosphere, and connections and exchanges with the hydrologic cycle. We will further explore pressing global environmental issues associated with the atmosphere: climate change (extreme weather events, shifting precipitation patterns), air pollution, acid rain and recovery, and depletion of the ozone layer. Lab work will be guided by scientific questions related to these issues, and will focus on detection of anthropogenic influence on air quality.  Specifically, students will manipulate models to conduct field sampling, and utilize microbiological and chemical assays in the lab to better understand sources for and tracking of contaminants in air and the implications for people.  Class size: 20

 

92102

EUS 305

 EUS Practicum: PRESERVATION, PEOPLE, AND PLACE: RETHINKING THE BARD CAMPUS

Mike Aziz

    F        10:10-12:30 pm

HEG 308

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies   This course uses Bard’s campus as a laboratory for learning integrated planning. Through a series of lectures, readings and campus tours, students will learn systems analysis, storytelling techniques and visualization skills. Students will also work collaboratively to develop and present architectural and landscape projects for Bard’s campus. The semester begins with explorative tours of the campus, observing the unique role of food, housing, landscape, and circulation systems. Students will become familiar with storytelling and introductory tools to present their findings and case studies. During the second half of the semester, students will work in small teams to develop a campus improvement that addresses the previously analyzed campus systems. By utilizing a process of iterative thinking, students will learn how to formulate, select and refine solutions. The semester culminates with student-devised projects that tackle, communicate and visualize these concepts. This course does not require any prior landscape design or architectural skills. Open to moderated Upper College students."  Class size: 15

 

92106

EUS 405

 Environmental Policy I

Monique Segarra

 T  Th    1:30-3:00 pm

ALBEE 102

SA

SSCI

This is a graduate course open to a limited number of undergraduates with Upper College status. Permission of the instructor and EUS director required. This course sequence analyzes the dynamic and complex relationship among various factors—legal, political, cultural, and ethical—that influence the environmental policy-making process. The courses use a case-study approach to introduce students to the core concepts of environmental policy making and environmental policy cycles that include defining the environmental problem, setting the environmental agenda, and presenting and implementing policy solutions. Students examine state and social responses to new and ongoing environmental problems. In the United States context, this includes taking into account the nature of state-federal relationships in developing and applying the environmental law, as well as the evolving role of technology, tensions between private and public interests, and equity considerations. In addition to U.S. environmental policy, the courses explore international environmental regime development, conflict resolution, and trans-boundary citizen networks that influence global environmental decision making.  This is a graduate course open to a limited number of undergraduates with Upper College status. Permission of the instructor and EUS director required.

 

92107

EUS 409

 Environmental Law for Policy

Victor Tafur

  W         1:30-4:00 pm

ALBEE 102

SA

SSCI

This is a graduate course open to a limited number of undergraduates with Upper College status. Permission of the instructor and EUS director required.  This course introduces students to the core concepts of environmental law in the context of interdisciplinary policy making. Students examine responses and solutions to environmental problems that rely on legal and regulatory instruments, judicial decisions, and voluntary agreements, while exploring the interaction between environmental law and policy. They also take into account the nature of international, federal, state, and local relationships in developing and applying the law, as well as the role of technology and science, tensions between private and public interests, and environmental justice considerations. The course transitions from foundational concepts into more advanced specialized environmental subjects. Theory and practice are combined to address issues of contemporary importance. A main goal is to gain a sense of the various legal approaches to environmental problems.   This is a graduate course open to a limited number of undergraduates with Upper College status. Permission of the instructor and EUS director required.

 

92363

ARTH 125

 MODERN ARCHITECTURE: 1850 - 1950

Deepa Ramaswany

 T  Th    11:50 am – 1:10 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies 

 

92364

ARTH 268

 POSTWAR MODERNISM: BUILDINGS, CONTEXTS AND GLOBAL SHIFTS

Deepa Ramaswany

  T   Th   3:10 pm – 4:30 pm

OLIN 204

AA

AART

2-credits, starting mid-October 

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies 

 

92295

ARTH 352

 CITIES AND PHOTOGRAPHY

Luc Sante

  T            1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies   

 

92034

CHI 216

 Travel & Travel Writing: China

Li-Hua Ying

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLINLC 118

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Literature

 

92020

LIT 129

 Moby Dick Lives

Alexandre Benson

 T  Th    4:40-6:00 pm

OLIN 201

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies  

 

92074

LIT 2191

 Media/Metropolis:Modern Japan

Nathan Shockey

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

HEG 102

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities

 

91887

BIO 202

 Ecology and Evolution

Bruce Robertson

  W  F     8:30-11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

91889

BIO 244

 Biostatistics

Arseny Khakhalin

  W  F     1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 115

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global Public Health; Mathematics

 

91893

BIO 433

 Advanced Community Ecology

Cathy Collins

   Th       1:30-3:50 pm

RKC 200

 

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

92307

PHYS 124

CLIMATE CHANGE

Gidon Eshel

    Lab A:

     Lab B:   

M  W      10:10 – 11:30 am

M           11:50 – 1:30 pm

  T          10:10 – 11:50 am

OLIN 102

Albee 100

Albee 100

LS

SCI

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies 

 

92128

ANTH 211

 Archaeological Methods

Christopher Lindner

  W         4:40-6:00 pm

    F        1:30-4:30 pm

HEG 201

ROSE 108

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

92120

ANTH 216

 The Modern Dinosaur

Yuka Suzuki

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 204

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Science, Technology, Society

 

92131

ANTH 319

 Toxicity & Contamination

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies; Science, Technology, Society

 

92287

BGIA 301

CORE SEMINAR: THE CITY AS A GLOBAL ACTOR – NEW YORK AT THE CENTER OF THE WORLD

James Ketterer

TBA

NYC

SA

 

SSCI

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

92144

ECON 221

 Economic Development

Sanjaya DeSilva

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Latin American Studies; Science, Technology, Society

 

92145

ECON 229

 Introduction to Econometrics

Sanjaya DeSilva

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

ALBEE 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

92110

HIST 204

 Environmentalism of the Poor

Alice Stroup

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 107

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

92153

HIST 2142

 Harlem,Bronzeville,South Central: the making of the american ghetto

Myra Armstead

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 203

HA

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

92240

PS 314

 Political Econ. of Development

Sanjib Baruah

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

HEG 300

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92118

SOC 138

 Intro to Urban Sociology

Peter Klein

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

RKC 102

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies 

 

92121

SOC 205

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

HDR 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

92124

SOC 231

 The Environment & Society

Peter Klein

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 201

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Science, Technology, Society