19319

EUS 101

 Intro to Environmental & Urban Studies

Peter Klein

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLINLC 115

SA

SSCI

An introduction to key themes and fields that addresses environmental and urban questions. While disentangling and analyzing the terms used to describe aspects of the environment—nature/culture, human/nonhuman, wilderness, urbanism, countryside, and the city—this interdisciplinary course considers issues such as environmental justice, biodiversity preservation, protected natural areas, infrastructure, agricultural and food sustainability, ecotourism, climate change, and development. The course is organized around four ways that humans relate to their environments: observing, organizing and classifying, collecting and distributing, and conserving. Under the rubric of each category, students will become familiar with various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches represented in the EUS curriculum (such as anthropology, cultural geography, environmental literature and history, modeling and statistics, natural history, political ecology, sociology, spatial analysis, and urban economics), while engaging with their methods. EUS 101 and     EUS 102 are required courses for moderation into EUS.  Class size: 22

 

19035

EUS 102

 Introduction to Environmental  system Science

Robyn Smyth

Th          9:00-11:20 am

 Lab:  M 1:30-4:30 pm

OLIN 101

RKC 114

 

LS

SCI

This course offers an integrated exploration of the science underlying environmental issues. The primary objective is to provide students with a systems-oriented understanding of biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that affect earth, air, water, and life. Students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamental scientific principles governing environmental systems including the cycling of matter and the flow of energy. By practicing the application of these scientific concepts, students will develop their ability to think critically about the potential outcomes of complex environmental issues. Local and global examples of elemental cycling, hydrology, ecology, agriculture, urbanization, and climate change will be used. This class will include some local field trips and outdoor data collection.  Class size: 20

 

19320

EUS 203

 Geographic Information Systems

Susan Winchell-Sweeney

    F        9:30 am – 12:00 pm

HDR 101A

SA

SSCI

2 credits  Students will explore the various spatial analysis methods used by scientists, planners, and public-policy makers to improve the understanding and management of our world. Students will learn the fundamentals of modeling, data analysis and mapping using geospatial technologies. Practical exercises relate to themes studied throughout the year. In this project-based class, students begin by learning the fundamentals of using spatial information, conducting spatial analysis, and producing and interpreting maps. In the second half of the course, they apply these skills to a team-based research project of their own design. The program culminates in a poster session, where the students show their work to their peers, professors in the program, and the greater Bard community.  Class size: 11

 

19517

EUS 218

 Land

Gidon Eshel

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

 T           10:10–11:50 am

RKC 200

HDR 106

LS

SCI

Fundamentals of land--atmosphere interactions through exchanges of water in all three phases, heat, radiation, energy, linear and angular momentum, CO2, or nutrients, with focus on agricultural and built environment perturbations.  Note: this course will be offered at the 200 or 300 level, with a more intense lab at the 300 level. Contact Prof. Eshel with questions.  Class size: 15

 

19036

EUS 221

 Water

Robyn Smyth

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

W           8:30-11:30 am

RKC 102

ROSE 306 (Bard Water Lab)

LS

SCI

This course offers a detailed exploration of the earth's hydrosphere and its interactions with the biosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere. Topics will include origins of the hydrosphere, origins of life, the global hydrologic cycle, and anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. We will further explore pressing global environmental issues associated with the hydrosphere: climate change, protection of drinking water resources, freshwater and marine ecosystem degradation, and waste water treatment. Lab work will be guided by scientific  questions related to these issues, and will focus on detection of anthropogenic influence, management  and maintenance of water resources,  and frontiers of scientific  approaches to sustainable human interactions with water resources.   Labs will include field sampling, lab analysis, and computer modeling to improve understanding of the ecological ramifications of water pollution in marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems. Prerequisites: EUS 102, Bio 202, or permission of instructor.  Class size: 18

 

19321

EUS 223

 Air Quality Research

Elias Dueker

  W         1:30-4:30 pm

ROSE 306 (Bard Water Lab)

LS

SCI

2-credits. Harmful algal blooms in the ocean and freshwater lakes, streams, and rivers are increasing across the United States, threatening drinking water supplies, aquatic ecology, and human health. While we know that these algal blooms can be toxic to animals and humans if ingested or through skin contact, we know very little about the potential for exposure to these toxins through the air. Using cutting-edge field and laboratory equipment, this class will conduct research focused on characterizing and quantifying connections between water quality and air quality regionally. Prerequisites:  EUS 102 or other 100-level lab science course. Class size: 16

 

19326

EUS 307

 EnvironmEntAl Policy II

Monique Segarra

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

ALBEE 102

SA

SSCI

This course analyzes the dynamic and complex relationship among various factors—legal, political, cultural, and ethical—that influence the environmental policy-making process. It uses a case-study approach to introduce students to the core concepts of environmental policy making and environmental policy cycles that include defining the environmental problem, setting the environmental agenda, and presenting and implementing policy solutions. Students examine state and social responses to new and ongoing environmental problems. In the United States context, this includes taking into account the nature of state-federal relationships in developing and applying the environmental law, as well as the evolving role of technology, tensions between private and public interests, and equity considerations. In addition to U.S. environmental policy, the course explores international environmental regime development, conflict resolution, and transboundary citizen networks that influence global environmental decision making. Open to moderated students. Class size: 8

 

19322

EUS 311

 Climate & Agroecology

Jennifer Phillips

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

ALBEE 102

SA

SSCI

In this course we will examine the linkages between agroecosystems and the climate system. We begin by looking at projections for climate change impacts on crop production, with a focus on crop simulation models, their applications and limitations. We then look at expectations for the influence of elevated CO 2 on yield, and controversies involved. We then turn to a discussion of the role that agriculture can play in climate change mitigation, given the large greenhouse gas emissions associated with farming systems. This takes us to an in-depth discussion of soil carbon management, and trade-offs between emissions from various reductions strategies. Finally, we will investigate the various strategies being put forth regarding climate change adaptation, including the role of genetically modified crops, biodiversity, and system resilience, with major implications for future food production. This is a graduate course offered to a limited number of undergraduates. Interested students should contact Eban Goodstein.  Class size: 15

 

19324

EUS 317

 PRACTICUM: Re-Imagined Farms in re-imagined Spaces

Katrina Light

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

HDR 101A

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Experimental Humanities  This course examines the role farms and gardens play within institutions and the interplay of race, gender, class and power within these spaces. Working closely with farmer, Rebecca Yoshino, students will answer the questions: What purpose do these spaces serve? Who are the primary stakeholders and who benefits? Students will study issues surrounding land-use, equity, and social capital. Through a series of lectures and site visits to our own as well as other non-profit growing spaces, students will gather this information. Through this process they will hone interview techniques, create visual  representations and ultimately, examine, synthesize and distribute findings to community stakeholders. Finally, students will develop a mission statement and re-imagined direction for Bard’s agricultural initiatives.  Moderation required or professor approval. Class size: 15

 

19323

EUS 318

 Land

Gidon Eshel

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

M           1:30-4:00 pm

RKC 200

HDR 106

LS

SCI

Fundamentals of land--atmosphere interactions through exchanges of water in all three phases, heat, radiation, energy, linear and angular momentum, CO2, or nutrients, with focus on agricultural and built environment perturbations.  Note: this course will be offered at the 200 or 300 level, with a more intense lab at the 300 level. Contact Prof. Eshel with questions.  Class size: 15

 

19325

EUS 322

 The Politics of Solutions

Monique Segarra

M           2:00-4:40 pm

ALBEE 102

SA

SSCI

Innovative solutions to mitigating and adapting to climate change are emerging at a rapid pace, from the private and public sector, non-governmental organizations, research institutions and not least, from individuals and communities. China and other global economies have made domestic as well as international commitments to moving to a low carbon economy. Despite the withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Agreement, innovations continue supported by sub-national governments and the private sector. This class will examine a range of climate solutions whose viability, in addition to their technological or economic cost, is shaped by ideas, interests, and institutions that facilitate or impede their moving onto policy agendas or to large-scale adoption. The course will consider solutions that include renewable energy technologies, urban planning, land use management and changing individual and social behaviors. In particular, we will be focusing on three key concepts, innovation, social learning and knowledge management as the threads that tie together the differing subject matter we address this semester. Cases are drawn from the United States but also include innovations in China, South Korea and Latin America.  Class size: 10

 

19037

EUS 413

 Sewage

Elias Dueker

 T           9:10-11:30 am

RKC 200

 

 

Cross-listed: Biology  While the practice of releasing raw sewage into public waterways has been occurring on a global scale for centuries, environmental scientists, environmental engineers, and municipal decisionmakers are still struggling to end this practice. Effective management of this environmental and human health threat requires close collaboration of scientists, engineers, municipal decisionmakers and taxpayers. Furthermore, equitable management of sewage requires a close look at societal issues of race, class, and gender, since many sewage treatment plants and raw sewage releases occur in communities lacking economic and political power.  The Hudson River provides a great case study for this issue, since billions of gallons of raw, untreated sewage are released into public waterways each year.  This class will take a deep dive into the science of sewage and its relation to human health, both globally and in our own backyard.  We will read and discuss primary literature addressing the management and disposal of sewage in urban and rural environments, including contemporary microbiological, chemical and physical scientific research, epidemiological and demographical analyses, and community-level literature (local press, interviews, guest lectures).  Furthermore, we will take a critical look at current scientific efforts to address the environmental problem of sewage management along the Hudson River (from Albany to NYC), with an eye toward creating a vision for future efforts that are more closely aligned with community-level needs and management-level challenges.  Prerequsite:  200-level lab sciences course.   Class size: 18

 

19296

ANTH 212

 Historical Archaeology

Christopher Lindner

   Th       4:40-6:00 pm

    F        1:30-5:00 pm

HEG 201

Field Work

HA

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Historical Studies

 

19299

ANTH 265

 Race & Nature in Africa

Yuka Suzuki

 T  Th    8:30-9:50 am

OLIN 201

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19300

ANTH 324

 Doing Ethnography

Yuka Suzuki

   Th       10:10-12:30 pm

RKC 200

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights

 

19429

ART 205 JVB

 Sculpture II: Space Invaders

John von Bergen

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19217

ARTH 125

 Modern Architecture I

Meredith Gaglio

 M  W   1:30 pm – 2:50 pm

 RKC 103

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies 

 

19577

ARTH 228

 AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Meredith Gaglio

  M  W    3:10 pm – 4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental and Urban Studies 

 

19302

ANTH 349

 Political Ecology

Yuka Suzuki

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 310

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights 

 

19279

BGIA 301

 New York: Center of the World

James Ketterer

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

 

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

19023

BIO 157

 Food Microbiology

Gabriel Perron

 T  Th    1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 114 / 115

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19028

BIO 202

 Ecology and Evolution

Cathy Collins

  W  F     8:30-11:30 am

RKC 115

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19030

BIO 244

 Biostatistics

Gabriel Perron

M  W      3:00-5:00 pm

RKC 115

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global Public Health; Mathematics

 

19310

ECON 203

 Game Theory

Aniruddha Mitra

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLINLC 115

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Political Studies

 

19312

ECON 229

 Introduction to Econometrics

Sanjaya DeSilva

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

ALBEE 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies

 

19314

ECON 242

 Ecological Economics

Kris Feder

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

ALBEE 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19303

ECON 243

 Behavioral Economics

Gautam Sethi

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

ASP 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Psychology

 

19568

 HIST 112

  THREE CITIES: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE URBAN HISTORIES OF Lagos, Nairobi, & Johannesburg

Drew Thompson

M  W      1:30 pm – 2:50 pm

Barringer House 104

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Int’l Studies; Human Rights  

 

19329

HIST 123

 the Window at Montgomery Place

Myra Armstead

 T           1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19337

HIST 232

 American Urban History

Myra Armstead

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 205

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19339

HIST 2014

 History of New York City

Cecile Kuznitz

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 202

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19350

HR 323

 Race and the Pastoral

Ann Seaton

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

HEG 200

LA

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities

 

19018

LIT 259

 American Literature III

Matthew Mutter

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 201

LA

D+J

ELIT

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19197

LIT 3028

 SoundSCAPES OF American Literature

Alexandre Benson

   Th       4:40-7:00 pm

ANNANDALE HOUSE

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies, Experimental Humanities

 

19354

PHIL 140

 Other Animals

Jay Elliott

M  W      10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 107

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19465

PS 314

 Political Econ. of Development

Sanjib Baruah

 T           10:10-12:30 pm

OLIN 302

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19270

SOC 205

 Intro to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

HDR 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies; Human Rights

 

19488

WRIT 231

 Reading & Writing the Birds

Susan Rogers

 T           9:30-10:50 am

  Th        7:30-10:50 am

OLIN 305

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies

 

19492

WRIT 345

 Imagining Nonhuman Consciousns

Benjamin Hale

M           1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 308

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Human Rights