ENGAGED LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES:

ELAS courses are designed to link academic work and critical thinking skills from the classroom with civic and other forms of engagement activities that contextualize course materials and enhance learning. See cce.bard.edu/education/engaged-liberal-arts-sciences for more information.

 

19549

HUM T200

 GROUP TUTORIAL:  EXPLORING HUMAN CONNECTION THROUGH ARGENTINE TANGO I

Supervised by

Leon Botstein

  T  Th   3:40 pm 5:00 pm

CAMPUS CENTER MPR

2 credits Tango has a rich history and a distinct culture emerging from the socioeconomic conditions experienced by African, Caribbean and European immigrants in late 19th century Argentina and Uruguay. The culture evolved as tango both migrated to Europe and flourished in Argentina during the “Golden Age” (1935-1955). Tango then largely disappeared as a result of suppression under Argentina’s military regime. Tango’s global revival began in the 1980’s. Today it is danced in all major cities, and at colleges and universities, around the world. This ELAS group tutorial explores the profound human connections that Argentine Tango music and dance engender. It includes discussions of the historical and cultural context of the music and dance, and the gender politics that surround it.  In a workshop setting, the group will focus with practitioner Chungin Goodstein primarily on learning the fundamentals of the dance.   Work for the tutorial will be split between experiential learning through actual practice and readings/videos on issues relating to this dance form.  Students will also attend at least one “milonga” or community dance event either locally, or in NYC. 

 

19296

ANTH 212

 early german and african americans near bard: Historical Archaeology

Christopher Lindner

   Th       4:40-6:00 pm

  F          1:30-5:00 pm

HEG 201

Field work

HA

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Historical Studies  Our research and excavations focus on a religious site 9 miles north of Bard, in 1710 epicenter of the first substantial German-speaking community in the New World. After a mass emigration from the Rhineland, and two years of forced labor conditions under British colonists, the economy of these orchard farmers, vintners, and artisans began to flourish in the central Hudson Valley. Their diaspora from here established the Mohawk Valley's Palatines, the Pennsylvania Deutsch, and the Shenandoah Germans in Virginia. Before 1750 our site, the Calvinist minister’s home (or Parsonage) was the scene of visits from Mohicans, likely from a Moravian mission village in the Taconic hills east of Bard, their last settlement in New York. African Americans lived at the site as slaves by the 1780s, if not decades earlier. We have found traces of their spiritual practices for protection and healing. In the mid-1800s, several free African American families established a neighborhood nearby that may have lasted until the early 20th Century. We’ll do 3.5-hour excavation and/or lab sessions on Fridays, or weekend afternoons before mid-term, to find more evidence of ritual concealment, working at times with local middle school students. To better contextualize our research, we’ll study background texts to write short papers for weekly seminars. Please consult with the professor in advance of enrollment. [Some participants continue for another month in summer on the Bard Archaeology Field School, for 4 more credits; see www.bard.edu/archaeology/fieldschool.] Class size: 12

 

19292

ANTH  / GIS 224

 A Lexicon of Migration

Jeffrey Jurgens

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

Barringer House 104

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Global & International Studies (core course); Human Rights (core course) Migration is one of the most important and contested features of today’s interconnected world. In one way or another, it has transformed most if not all contemporary nation-states into “pluralist,” “post-migrant,” and/or “super-diverse” polities. And it affects everyone—regardless of their own migratory status. This course examines the history of migration from local, national, and global perspectives, with particular emphasis on the uneven economic and geopolitical developments that have produced specific forms of mobility into and through the U.S. The course also traces the emergence of new modes of border regulation and migration governance as well as novel forms of migrant cultural production and representation. Above all, it aims to provide students with the tools to engage critically with many of the concepts and buzzwords—among them “asylum,” “border,” “belonging,” “citizenship,” and “illegality”—that define contemporary public debates. A Lexicon of Migration is a Bard/HESP (Higher Education Support Program) network course that will collaborate with similar courses at Bard College Berlin, Al-Quds Bard, and the American University of Central Asia.  Class size: 22

 

19295

ANTH 239

 Action Research:  Social Service,   Community Organizing, and anthropology

Gregory Morton

  W         3:10-4:30 pm

      F      9:30-1:30 pm

OLIN 302

Field work

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights  Action research is research that aims to produce locally-based knowledge with practical and immediate importance to someone: for example, to a nonprofit, to a mayor, to a business, or to a union. This course combines classroom readings with weekly work in a community organization. In class, students will read from traditions that grapple with problems at the intersection of social science and social change, focusing on sources important to anthropology, including texts by Vico, Marx, Tax, Scheper-Hughes, Hale, Kesha-Kahn Perry, and Speed. We will consider influences from constructivism, pragmatism, collaborative anthropology, and militant anthropology. The class will promote an analytic engagement with human services, encouraging us to think in an anthropological vein and emphasizing the practice of participant observation. Outside of the classroom, students will commit to a semester-long internship with a group that carries out community organizing or social service. We will strive to produce research that advances the project of the groups to which we are committed. The class will meet twice each week: (a) once for a classroom session of one hour and twenty minutes and (b) once for an internship session of four to eight hours. At both locations, we strive to put anthropology to work in the world.  Interested students must email professor Morton at gmorton@bard.edu before registration and complete a brief online form.  Class size: 10

 

19300

ANTH 324

 Doing Ethnography

Yuka Suzuki

   Th       10:10-12:30 pm

RKC 200

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights What are the ethical stakes, practical questions, and methodological tools that we use when we practice ethnography? Ethnography is the cornerstone of contemporary cultural anthropology, and includes both fieldwork and representation. This course is a survey of, and practicum in, ethnographic field methods. We will study and critique traditional ethnographic methods such as participant-observation, interviewing, archival research, visual, sonic, textual and spatial analysis, and address the challenges of doing fieldwork in a variety of contexts, including the virtual domain. A series of sequenced intensive research exercises will raise guiding questions about how ethnographic research can be ethically and effectively "translated" into written text. We attend also to emergent ethnographic forms and methods, such as multi-sited ethnography, critical moral anthropology, and indigenous methodologies and critiques. To complement the fieldwork projects, we will also read exemplary, and sometimes controversial, texts of ethnography in practice. Students will develop a community- or environmentally-based ethnographic research project of their own design throughout the course of the semester. Ethical aspects of conducting ethnographic fieldwork, including preparing for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, will be addressed. This seminar is primarily intended for anthropology students preparing for senior project research. Prerequisites: Introduction to Anthropology 101.  Class size: 15

 

19412

ART 200 AC

 Digital II: Manufacturing Dissent

Adriane Colburn

 T           1:30-4:30 pm

FISHER

PA

PART

In a political moment rife with anxiety, it is a challenge to channel concern and outrage into a force for good. In this class we will explore visual and active strategies for responding to our unique and intense political moment. Over the course of the semester we will survey a range of visual devices for articulating concern, dissent, anger, hope and curiosity. Beginning with Adobe Illustrator, a powerful tool for creating graphics, we will use text and image to generate energetic messaging campaigns. As the semester progresses we will create work that is site specific, public-facing and activated by its user. Digital II is designed for students with some experience in studio arts, digital image making and/or technology.  Class size: 12

 

19279

BGIA 301

 New York: Center of the World

James Ketterer

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

 

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & International Studies Non-state actors have gained increasing importance in international affairs, and the expanded role of cities is often overlooked.  Particularly in the post-9/11 era, cities are directly managing a wide variety of international issues and are hubs for the international movement of people, money and ideas. New York City is the ideal case study: city police are deployed overseas to monitor terrorist networks, financial institutions manage the global flow of trillions of dollars, the UN is the headquarters of international diplomacy, the city hosts a diverse mix of NGOs and major media, and New York is the destination for immigrants arriving from all corners of the world. This course explores the theoretical debates and practical policy effects of cities as non-state actors in international affairs. How should we define non-state actors? Where do cities fit in those debates? What strategies do different non-state actors use to influence national and global policy-making, with a particular focus on cities?  In addition, the course contextualizes students’ internship experiences within this broader discussion to critically examine how ideas about the role of non-state actors in world politics play out in practice. We will take advantage of our New York City location with guest speakers from a wide spectrum of organizations within the field, such as the United Nations, US State Department, New York Police Department, the Federal Reserve, Human Rights Watch, New York State Homeland Security, Council on Foreign Relations, World Policy Institute, Open Society Foundation, and many others.   Class size: 22

 

19023

BIO 157

 Food Microbiology

Gabriel Perron

 T  Th    1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 114 / 115

LS

SCI

In this course designed for non-majors and intended biology majors, we will study the microorganisms that inhabit, create, or contaminate food. The first half of the course will introduce students to topics in food safety such as food spoilage, foodborne infections, and antibiotic resistance. In the second half of the course, students will learn how to harness the capabilities of the many microbes present in our environment to turn rotting vegetables or spoiling milk into delicious food. Students will also learn how next-generation technologies are revealing the important ecological dynamics shaping microbial communities in transforming food with possible beneficial effects on human health. Throughout the course, students will learn how to design, conduct, and analyze simple experiments while working with microbiology techniques, including DNA sequencing. No prerequisite.  Class size: 18

 

19311

ECON 225

 Economic Perspectives

Pavlina Tcherneva

  W  F     11:50-1:10 pm

HEG 106

SA

SSCI

Why do economists disagree? As economic systems evolve, so have the theories used to explain them. Since Adam Smith, economists have used different assumptions, models and methodologies to study the role of markets, states, and institutions in the process of social provisioning. This course will survey the diverse traditions in economics and introduce students to competing paradigms. It covers several distinct approaches including Classical Political Economy, Neoclassical, Institutionalist, Post Keynesian, Marxist, Feminist, Development and Green Economics. The objective is to gain a broad appreciation of the specific problems that each of these traditions emphasizes and the contributions to theory and policy each has made. Students will examine not only the evolution of ideas and theories, but also their practical application today. Some of the specific issues that the course will consider include the causes and cures for unemployment, the evolution and interaction of culture, technology and the environment, and the role and nature of money in shaping the modern world. As we contemplate modern economic problems, sometimes the good old ideas produce the best new ideas. Prerequisite: Econ 100. Class size: 20

 

19035

EUS 102

 Introduction to Environmental  system Science

Robyn Smyth

Th          9:00-11:20 am

 Lab: M 1:30-4:30 pm

 

OLIN 101

RKC 114

 

LS

SCI

This course offers an integrated exploration of the science underlying environmental issues. The primary objective is to provide students with a systems-oriented understanding of biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that affect earth, air, water, and life. Students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamental scientific principles governing environmental systems including the cycling of matter and the flow of energy. By practicing the application of these scientific concepts, students will develop their ability to think critically about the potential outcomes of complex environmental issues. Local and global examples of elemental cycling, hydrology, ecology, agriculture, urbanization, and climate change will be used. This class will include some local field trips and outdoor data collection.  Class size: 20

 

19517

EUS 218

 Land

Gidon Eshel

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

 T           10:10 – 11:50 am

RKC 200

LS

SCI

Fundamentals of land--atmosphere interactions through exchanges of water in all three phases, heat, radiation, energy, linear and angular momentum, CO2, or nutrients, with focus on agricultural and built environment perturbations.  Note: this course will be offered at the 200 or 300 level, with a more intense lab at the 300 level. Contact Prof. Eshel with questions.  Class size: 15

 

19036

EUS 221

 Water

Robyn Smyth

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

W           8:30-11:30 am

RKC 102

ROSE 306 (Water Lab)

LS

SCI

This course offers a detailed exploration of the earth's hydrosphere and its interactions with the biosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere. Topics will include origins of the hydrosphere, origins of life, the global hydrologic cycle, and anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. We will further explore pressing global environmental issues associated with the hydrosphere: climate change, protection of drinking water resources, freshwater and marine ecosystem degradation, and waste water treatment. Lab work will be guided by scientific  questions related to these issues, and will focus on detection of anthropogenic influence, management  and maintenance of water resources,  and frontiers of scientific  approaches to sustainable human interactions with water resources.   Labs will include field sampling, lab analysis, and computer modeling to improve understanding of the ecological ramifications of water pollution in marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems. Prerequisites: EUS 102, Bio 202, or permission of instructor.  Class size: 18

 

19321

EUS 223

 Air Quality Research

Elias Dueker

  W         1:30-4:30 pm

ROSE 306 (Bard Water Lab)

LS

SCI

2-credits. Harmful algal blooms in the ocean and freshwater lakes, streams, and rivers are increasing across the United States, threatening drinking water supplies, aquatic ecology, and human health. While we know that these algal blooms can be toxic to animals and humans if ingested or through skin contact, we know very little about the potential for exposure to these toxins through the air. Using cutting-edge field and laboratory equipment, this class will conduct research focused on characterizing and quantifying connections between water quality and air quality regionally. Prerequisites:  EUS 102 or other 100-level lab science course. Class size: 16

 

19324

EUS 317

 Re-Imagined Farms in re-imagined Spaces

Katrina Light

   Th       1:30-4:30 pm

HDR 101A

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Experimental Humanities  This course examines the role farms and gardens play within institutions and the interplay of race, gender, class and power within these spaces. Working closely with farmer, Rebecca Yoshino, students will answer the questions: What purpose do these spaces serve? Who are the primary stakeholders and who benefits? Students will study issues surrounding land-use, equity, and social capital. Through a series of lectures and site visits to our own as well as other non-profit growing spaces, students will gather this information. Through this process they will hone interview techniques, create visual  representations and ultimately, examine, synthesize and distribute findings to community stakeholders. Finally, students will develop a mission statement and re-imagined direction for Bard’s agricultural initiatives.  Moderation required or professor approval. Class size: 15

 

19323

EUS 318

 Land

Gidon Eshel

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

M           1:30-4:00 pm

RKC 200

 

LS

SCI

Fundamentals of land--atmosphere interactions through exchanges of water in all three phases, heat, radiation, energy, linear and angular momentum, CO2, or nutrients, with focus on agricultural and built environment perturbations.  Note: this course will be offered at the 200 or 300 level, with a more intense lab at the 300 level. Contact Prof. Eshel with questions.  Class size: 15

 

19329

HIST 123

 the Window at Montgomery Place

Myra Armstead

 T           1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 205

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities

2 credits  In 1802, when widow Janet Montgomery (1743-1824) acquired a 380-acre property on the Hudson River, she began the process  of converting the landscape  from a "wilderness"  into a "pleasure ground."   This transformation was a physical one, reflecting prevailing ideas about the ideal, aesthetic relationship between humans and "nature" as well as emerging notions regarding scientific agriculture. After her death, her successors continued this task.  Additionally, the creation and development of Montgomery Place mirrored contemporary social relations and cultural conventions, along with shifts in these realities at the national level. As it was populated by indentured servants, tenants, slaves, free workers, and elites, Montgomery Place will be approached as a historical laboratory for understanding social hierarchies, social roles, cultural practices, and the evolving visions of the nation and "place" that both sustained and challenged these things during the nineteenth century in the United States.  Class size: 22

 

19344

HIST 301

 The Second World War

Sean McMeekin

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 201

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Political Studies  This course examines the Second World War in all its manifold dimensions, from causes to consequences, covering all major fronts.  The course satisfies the 300-level requirement for HS majors for either historiography or the research-focused major conference, but non-history majors are also welcome.  Students taking the course as a major conference are strongly encouraged to use the resources of the FDR Library in Hyde Park, which we will visit together. Class size: 15