19139

CLAS 115

 Introduction: The Greek World

Robert Cioffi

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 202

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Historical Studies  This course will explore the social, cultural, and political history of the Greek world from its earliest beginnings in the Bronze Age to the “renaissance” of Greek literature and culture under the Roman empire. We will examine the creation of political forms (from democracy to tyranny), contacts and conflicts between Greece and the East, the rise and fall of world empires, and the invention of literary genres from lyric poetry to the Greek novel. Ancient sources such as vase paintings, inscriptions, and texts like Aeschylus’ Persians and Aristophanes’ comedies will allow us to view the Greek world both from the top down and from the bottom up, asking how the experience of statesmen and literary authors as well as soldiers, merchants, women, and slaves shaped and was shaped by the world of Greece. Intended as an introductory course for both majors and non-majors, this course assumes no prior knowledge about the ancient world. All readings will be in English.  Class size: 22

 

19141

CLAS 232

 Herodotus and Thucydides

James Romm

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 303

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Historical Studies  These two Greek prose writers are generally called historians, but the term only begins to describe them. Herodotus uses the chronicle of the Persian Wars to explore geography, anthropology, religion, and ethical philosophy; Thucydides weaves into his account of the Peloponnesian War debates on foreign policy, political science, justice, and morality. Both writers address themselves to timeless concerns of democracies and of hegemonic powers, hence of the modern-day US. This course will read both their works in entirety, with attention to the questions they raise in both ancient and modern contexts. The historical evolution of fifth-century Greece will form the backdrop to these questions and will be an essential component of the course.  Class size: 18

 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES: GREEK

 

19142

GRE 102

 Beginning Ancient Greek II

Lauren Curtis

M T W Th                10:10-11:10 am

OLINLC 210

FL

FLLC

The second semester of this two-semester sequence is designed for students with no experience with ancient Greek (or other ancient languages) to read authors such as Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, and Herodotus in the original language. Regular grammatical exercises and drills will be combined with an emphasis on developing skills for translating, reading, and interpreting Greek literature, with longer passages from classical authors as the semester continues. Students who complete this sequence will be prepared to enroll in Greek 201: Intermediate Greek the following year. Class size: 16

 

19143

GRE 305

 Advanced Greek:

 Euripides' Bacchae

Robert Cioffi

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLINLC 206

FL

FLLC

In this class, we will read one of the last and the greatest of Euripides’ tragedies, the Bacchae. Performed posthumously in 405 BCE, the play narrates the return of Dionysos, the Greek god of theater, wine, and ecstasy, to his birthplace in Thebes. The tragedy is at once a deeply traditional story of homecoming and vengeance, and also a highly innovative and self-reflexive exploration of the nature of divinity and myth, of self and society, and of the mask, disguise, illusion, and tragedy itself. Students will further develop Greek reading fluency while gaining a range of critical approaches to Euripides’ play and working on research skills in Classics (including writing a research paper). Prerequisite: Greek 202 or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 16

 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES: LATIN

 

19144

LAT 106

 Basic Intensive Latin

David Ungvary

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

 T  Th    3:10-5:30 pm

OLINLC 208

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

8 credits  This course is designed to enable students with little to no experience with Latin to read authors such as Virgil, Ovid, Cicero, and Augustine in the original language after one semester's intensive work (the equivalent of two semesters of college Latin). Daily drills and frequent quizzes will be combined from the beginning with an emphasis on reading; students will begin reading short selections from classical authors after only a few weeks and longer passages by midterm. An additional and required weekly reading hour will be scheduled at the start of the semester. Those wishing to enroll in this course must consult with Prof. Ungvary or Prof. Romm, and attend a preliminary meeting this December. Class size: 16

 

19145

LAT 202

 IntermedIATE Latin II: Petronius’s satyricon

James Romm

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 303

FL

FLLC

Created by one of Nero's courtiers, the Satyricon has been called the first modern novel.  It follows the erotic and picaresque adventures of Encolpius, an educated young man whose satiric, self-aware voice permeates the narrative and brings us closer to everyday Roman life than any other surviving text.  Only small fragments of the work survive and one complete episode, the "Banquet of Trimalchio."  We will read large portions in Latin and all surviving passages in English, with discussions of grammar, literary technique and the social history of Neronian Rome. Class size: 12

 

19146

LAT 312

 AdvANCED Latin: Horace's Odes

Robert Cioffi

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 304

FL

FLLC

In this class, we will read a selection of Horace’s Odes, a collection of four books of Latin lyric that represent what is perhaps Horace’s greatest achievement. Ranging from the mythological to the historical, from the funny to the philosophical, we will consider him as the “inventor” of Latin lyric, as well as his poetry’s relationship to Greek and Roman literary traditions, his other works, and his cultural and historical context. Students will further develop Latin reading fluency while gaining a range of critical approaches to Horace’s poetry and working on research skills in Classics (including writing a research paper). Prerequisite: successful completion of Latin 202 or the permission of the instructor.  Class size: 16