92256

CLAS 211

 Gender & Sexuality in the Ancient World

Lauren Curtis

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 202

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies This course explores ancient Greek and Roman ideas about human sexuality and gender difference. Examining the worlds of myth, literature, and art, we will ask how bodies, spaces, and cultural institutions were gendered in the ancient world and try to assess how ancient discourses about normative and transgressive sexual practices and gender identities may be similar or different to our own. Topics will include ancient medical writing about reproduction and childbirth, issues of power, slavery, and prostitution, the relationship between homoeroticism and education, and the performance of gender on the Athenian stage. All readings will be in English. This course is part of the World Literature offering.  Class size: 22

 

92253

CLAS / HIST 236

 The Fall of the Roman Empire

David Ungvary

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 203

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Historical Studies; Literature  At the end of the third century AD, the Roman Empire stretched from Spain to Asia Minor. It was so vast that its administration was divided into eastern and western zones. Two hundred years later, the Empire lost control of most of its western provinces. The events associated with these losses constitute the “Fall of the Roman Empire.” This course takes an interdisciplinary perspective (incorporating archaeological, scientific, and literary evidence) to explore the causes behind the collapse of the imperial structure, and to assess the afterlife of Roman culture in the “Barbarian” West through the seventh century. It will track not only how institutions of government and religion changed, but also how human imaginations, identities, values, and cultural commitments evolved in response to crisis and in the aftermath of empire. Readings (in English translation) will introduce students to historians (Gregory of Tours), poet-philosophers (Boethius), theologians (Augustine), and letter writers (Sidonius Apollinaris) who reacted with astonishing self-awareness and creativity to their changing Roman worlds. By the end of the course, students will be equipped to produce historically sensitive close readings of late ancient texts, and to parse them with an eye toward categories of culture and identity. They can also expect to develop their own answers to one of ancient history’s most vexing questions: did the fall of the Roman Empire signal “the triumph of barbarism” and the “end of civilization,” or did continuity prevail?  No previous knowledge of Rome is assumed.  Class size: 22

 

92040

CLAS 242

 Classical Mythology

Robert Cioffi

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 202

FL

FLLC

What is the meaning of our mythologies? How do we understand and interpret traditional stories about the past? What is the relationship between mythology and history? This course will seek to answer some of these universal questions by examining selected myths of ancient Greece and Rome and by applying to them theoretical approaches to understanding and interpreting myth. We will proceed through close analysis of ancient texts in a variety of genres (epic, hymns, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, and prose summaries) as well as works of art. Topics will include: origin myths, Greek gods and heroes, war, the human-divine relationship (prayer, sacrifice, communication), madness, divine love and lust, death and the afterlife, and Greco-Roman mythology in its wider Mediterranean context. All readings will be in English translation. No previous background is required.  Class size: 22

 

GREEK

 

92042

GRE 101

 Beginning Ancient Greek I

Robert Cioffi

M T W Th 10:10-11:10 am

OLIN 307

FL

FLLC

This two-semester sequence is designed for students with no experience with ancient Greek (or other ancient languages) to read authors such as Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, and Herodotus in the original language. Regular grammatical exercises and drills will be combined with an emphasis on developing skills for translating, reading, and interpreting Greek literature: students will begin reading short selections from classical authors by the end of their first semester, and longer passages throughout the second semester. Students who complete this sequence will be prepared to enroll in Greek 201: Intermediate Greek the following year.  Class size: 16

 

92043

GRE 201

 Intermediate Greek:

Introduction to Classical Authors and Genres

Robert Cioffi

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 107

FL

FLLC

This course, designed for students reading continuous Greek for the first time, will build reading fluency and provide an introduction to several major authors and genres of Greek literature of the fifth and fourth centuries BCE. We will combine grammar review and drills with close reading of selections from Plato, Demosthenes, Sophocles, Euripides, and other Classical authors. The course will conclude by closely reading a connected text (chosen in consultation with participants), paying particular attention to its language, style, and syntax. Prerequisite: successful completion of Greek 102, or permission of instructor. Class size: 16

 

92044

GRE 315

 Advanced Greek - Comedy & City: ARISTOPHANES’ FROGS

Lauren Curtis

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLINLC 302

FL

FLLC

Aristophanes' comedies, at once bawdy and wordy, revolutionary and reactionary, combine spectacular mass entertainment with highly topical social commentary on Athens in the fifth century BCE. We will read in the original Greek Aristophanes' Frogs, first performed in 405 BCE, in which the god Dionysus descends to the Underworld to choose one of the recently-deceased tragic playwrights, Aeschylus and Euripides, to return to help the city in crisis. Part biting literary satire, part absurdist fantasy, the play puts under the microscope the relationship between drama and society in Athens. Students will further develop Greek reading fluency while gaining a range of critical approaches to Aristophanes' play and working on research skills in Classics (including writing a research paper). Prerequisite: Greek 201/202 or permission of the instructor.  Class size: 15

 

LATIN

 

92259

LAT 201

 Vergil's Aeneid

David Ungvary

M T  Th   9:00-9:50 am

OLIN 309

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Classical Studies Vergil's Aeneid is the greatest Roman epic; we will read portions of the first half of the epic in Latin, concentrating on increasing the students' confidence in Latin forms and syntax, but also in exploring the literary genius of Vergil -- the poem's themes and literary characteristics (figures of speech, structure, tropes, depiction of character, construction of the action, etc.). We will also read the Aeneid in its entirety in English.  Open to students who have completed Latin 102 at Bard or its equivalent elsewhere (consult with Prof. Romm, romm@bard.edu, if unsure about placement). Class size: 15

 

92045

LAT 310

 Advanced Latin: Ovid in Exile

Lauren Curtis

 T  Th    4:40-6:00 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

In 8 CE, Rome's most famous poet, Ovid, was banished by Augustus to the furthest frontier of the Roman Empire, the Black Sea. Far from his friends, family, and the cosmopolitan city he loved, he embarked upon the final work of his life: to record the experiences of exile in series of groundbreaking texts that grapple with the fraught relationship between the artist and imperial power and search for a literary language to express his state of geographic, political, and cultural exclusion. We will read the whole of Ovid's third book of Tristia ("Lamentations") in Latin along with as many selections from the rest of the corpus as time allows. Students will further develop Latin reading fluency while gaining a range of critical approaches to Ovid's text and working on research skills in Classics (including writing a research paper). Prerequisite: Latin 201/202 or permission of the instructor. Class size: 15

 

 

92215

PHIL 109

 Intro to Ancient Philosophy

Jay Elliott

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 205

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Classical Studies

 

92246

REL 244

 Religious Cultures Early India

Richard Davis

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

ALBEE 106

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Classical Studies