18351

CLAS 111

 Introduction to Greek Tragedy

Daniel Mendelsohn

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 203

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Theater and Performance  This course serves as a basic introduction to the study of the texts and traditions of Greek tragedy, which flourished during the 5th century BCE at Athens and was to prove enormously influential on subsequent Western literature. The class, designed for students with no special background in Classics, will consist primarily of close study of all of the major plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides in English translation, with the aim of gaining familiarity with the genre of tragedy as a complex art form and, in particular, as a preeminent vehicle for the transmission of core Western values—moral, political and aesthetic.  Emphasis will fall equally on tragedy’s formal aspects (plot, character, poetic language, questions of evolving genre) and its psychological, social and especially its political dimensions, the latter specifically within the context of tragedy’s ongoing presentation of conflict between the individual and society. Although emphasis will be on primary texts and sources, some secondary reading will be required, in order to familiarize students with the vast body of scholarship on this genre. Regular film showings will be a part of the course.

Class size: 18

 

18352

CLAS 333

 Greek & Roman Epic

Daniel Mendelsohn

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

RKC 200

LA

ELIT

Epic poetry was the most prestigious form of poetic expression throughout antiquity, and a grasp of its history, techniques, themes, structure, and ideologies is essential to any serious understanding of the Classical—and indeed the Western—literary tradition. This course will examine the evolution of the epic in the Greek and Roman worlds from its origins as an oral genre in the Archaic Greek period to its final efflorescence in the Late Antique period (late 4th/early 5th c. CE). The first half of the semester will be devoted to the Greeks, from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey (8th c. BCE) to the self-consciously literary productions of the Hellenistic period (Apollonius’s Argonautika, about the adventures of Jason and the Argonauts, 3rd century BCE). The second half of the semester will be devoted primarily to Latin-language epic of the late Republic and early Empire, which employed epic structures and techniques to explores such diverse subjects as philosophy and the natural sciences (Lucretius’s De Rerum Natura, 1st c. BCE), heroism and empire (Vergil’s Aeneid, 19 BCE), and recent Roman history (Lucan’s Pharsalia, 60s CE, about the conflict between Julius Caesar and Pompey). As the course concludes, we will examine the late Antique Greek-language epics written in the declining Roman imperial world (such as the Dionysiaca of Nonnus and Quintus of Smyrna’s Posthomerica) in order to focus on questions of literary “decadence” and ancient reception of earlier epic. Emphasis is on close reading, but there will be a good amount of secondary literature as well. Class size: 16

 

GREEK

 

18567

GRE 102

 BEGINNING GREEK  ii

Rana Liebert

 M  T  W Th  9:00 am – 10:00 am

OLIN 309

FL

FLLC

A continuation of Greek 101. Students will master advanced grammar and syntax and begin preliminary readings in Plato, Demosthenes, Sophocles, Euripides, and other Classical authors.  Class size: 16

 

18169

GRE 302

 Advanced Greek Poems

Robert Cioffi

 T  Th 3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

In this advanced Greek course, we will read selections of Greek lyric poetry composed in the seventh, sixth, and fifth centuries BCE by authors such as Sappho, Alcman, Anacreon, Solon, and Simonides. These poems, many of which only survive on papyrus, represent the invention of Greek poetic subjectivity. They will afford students an opportunity to examine questions of genre, performance, and the relationship between poetry and society, while further developing their reading fluency in Greek. Emphasis will be placed on developing critical approaches to lyric poetry, and on introducing students to the techniques of editing texts on papyrus. Class size: 16

 

LATIN

 

18566

LAT 102

 BEGINNING LATIN ii

Rana Liebert

 M  T  W  Th 10:30 am-11:30 am

HDR 106

FL

FLLC

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence designed to equip students who have no prior knowledge of Latin with the proficiency to read Latin poetry and prose in the original. An emphasis on grammatical exercises and drills will, during this second semester, be increasingly combined with reading selections from a wide range of Latin literature. Class size: 18

 

18170

LAT 202

 Vergil's Aeneid

James Romm

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLINLC 118

FL

FLLC

A close examination of the great Roman epic, by way of extensive passages read in Latin and a discussion of the entire poem in translation. Along the way we will review essential points of grammar and syntax, learn to scan and read the dactylic hexameter line, and develop a historical understanding of Vergil's troubled times and complex relationship to the regime of Augustus Caesar. For students at the intermediate level in Latin (see Prof. Romm for questions about placement). Class size: 18

 

18171

LAT 302

 Advanced Latin: Ovid’s Metamorphoses

Robert Cioffi

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

In this advanced Latin course, we will read selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a beguiling and learned (anti-)epic of change, which encompasses the history of the world from its origins in Chaos to Julius Caesar. We will focus on the work’s approach to narrative and myth, its assimilation of multiple generic forms from tragedy to pastoral, and its explanations of the world as the Romans knew it. In addition to further improving students’ reading fluency in Latin, emphasis will be placed on developing a range of critical approaches to Ovid’s work.  Class size: 16

 

18199

ARTH 210

 Roman Art and Architecture

Diana DePardo-Minsky

 T  Th  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Classical Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Italian Studies  This class follows the development of Roman art and architecture from the founding of the city by Romulus in 753 BCE to the transferal of the capital by Constantine in 330 CE.  Lectures explore how Romans incorporated and synthesized the styles and achievements of conquered peoples (including the Etruscans, Greeks, and Egyptians) to produce a complex visual vocabulary which articulated the nature of their Empire and established a common artistic language throughout the Mediterranean world.  This language eventually provided the foundation for Christian Iconography.  Requirements include a semester-long term paper (turned in at three intervals), a mid-term, a final, and quizzes.  Completion of this class qualifies students for consideration for Roma in Situ (ArtH 312; 8 credits), an intensive and advanced seminar taught in Rome during January of 2020 and completed at Bard in the following Spring semester.  Art History distributions: European and ancient to 1400. Open to all students.  Class size: 22

 

18450

REL 141

 Sanskrit II

Richard Davis

 T  Th 8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 202

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Classical Studies

 

18455

REL 242

 Hinduism in the Epics

Richard Davis

M  W  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLINLC 206

FL

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Classical Studies

 

18453

REL 256

 Women & Religion in classical Judaism

Samuel Secunda

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

RKC 103

MBV

D+J

HUM

DIFF

Cross-listed: Classical Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Middle Eastern Studies