18052

CHEM 142 I

 Basic Principles of Chemistry II

Christopher LaFratta

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:40 am

RKC 103

LS

SCI

Central concepts in this second part of the course are energy transfer, spontaneity, and change (thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium, and kinetics.) The laboratory stresses basic laboratory techniques and quantitative applications. Basic skills in mathematics and facility with algebra are required. Concurrent enrollment in calculus is recommended for students who intend to concentrate in chemistry. Prerequisite:  Chemistry 141, or its equivalent.   Class size: 20

 

18053

CHEM 142 II

 Basic Principles of Chemistry II

Justin Foy

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:40 am

RKC 102

LS

SCI

See above.  Class size: 20

CHEM 142 LAB OPTIONS: (register separately)

 

18054

CHEM 142 LBA

 Basic Prin of Chem II Lab

Christopher LaFratta

 T        1:30 pm-3:45 pm

RKC 126

LS

SCI

Class size: 14

 

18056

CHEM 142 LBC

 Basic Prin of Chem II Lab

Christopher LaFratta

  W      1:30 pm-3:45 pm

RKC 126

LS

SCI

Class size: 14

 

18057

CHEM 142 LBD

 Basic Prin of Chem II Lab

Christopher LaFratta

   Th    1:30 pm-3:45 pm

RKC 126

LS

SCI

Class size: 14

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18058

CHEM 202

 Organic Chemistry II

Emily McLaughlin

 T  Th 8:30 am-10:00 am

RKC 103

LS

SCI

Students study the structure and reactions of specific types of organic compounds and develop interrelationships that provide an integrated understanding of organic chemistry. The course emphasizes general principles and reaction mechanisms, but students are also expected to accumulate and utilize factual material. The laboratory is coordinated with classroom topics and should provide direct experience with many reactions and concepts. The laboratory is also intended to develop familiarity with experiment design, experimental techniques, and instrumental methods such as chromatography and spectroscopy.  Prerequisite: CHEM 201.  Class size: 20

CHEM 202 LAB OPTIONS: (register separately)

18059

CHEM 202 LBA

 Organic Chemistry II Lab

Justin Foy

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 122 / 124

LS

SCI

Class size: 10

 

18060

CHEM 202 LBB

 Organic Chemistry II Lab

Justin Foy

   Th    1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 122 / 124

LS

SCI

Class size: 10

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18061

CHEM 312

 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Craig Anderson

  W  F  10:10 am-11:40 am

RKC 122

LS

SCI

An introduction to the chemistry of the elements, the class places emphasis on the classification of the properties and reactivity of the elements by chemical periodicity, structure, and bonding. Topics in modern inorganic chemistry to be covered include: molecular orbital and spectroscopic applications of symmetry and group theory, coordination chemistry of the transition metals, and organometallic reactions and mechanisms.  Prerequisites: Chemistry 201-202. Co-requisites: CHEM 360, or permission of instructor.  Class size: 12

 

18062

CHEM 360

 Advanced Techniques in Synthesis

Craig Anderson

Emily McLaughlin

M         12:20 pm-6:40 pm

RKC 122 / 126

LS

SCI

Advanced lab concepts and techniques will be introduced and studied.  Multi-step organic and organometallic synthesis will cover a solid portion of the course. Air and moisture sensitive techniques will be explored.  We will also cover many analytical, physical, inorganic, and organic chemistry techniques and applications, as necessary. Weekly assignments, tests, presentations, and lab reports will be the basis for evaluation for the course.   Class size: 12

 

18064

CHEM 399

 Independent Research

Chemistry Faculty

M         9:00 am-12:00 pm

T  Th   9:00 am-1:30 pm

    F     11:50 am-5:00 pm

RKC 122

NA

 

See Chemistry faculty.

 

18063

CHEM 461

 Molecular Machines

Justin Foy

 T        3:10 pm-5:30 pm

RKC 122

 

 

In this course we will explore the design principles of artificial molecular machines. In this context we will learn that the operation of machines at the nanoscale is not the same as those in the macroscopic world. At the nanoscale, thermal noise and Brownian motion dominate over forces that we experience every day such as gravity and inertia. Thus, a major focus will be to analyze the common molecular level design principles—ratcheting mechanisms— that occur both in biological machines and artificial systems. During the course we will explore interesting topics ranging from the historical development of molecular machines, focused on controlling the motion about a single bond, to the more recent examples of artificial motors, ribosomes, pumps and the development of new non equilibrium materials. This will be a seminar style course utilizing primary literature. Prerequisites: Chemistry 202 or by permission of the instructor.  Class size: 12