91881

BIO 115

 Genetics and Identity

Michael Tibbetts

 T           10:10-11:30 am

     Th     9:00 am – 11:00 am

RKC 111 / 112

RKC 111 / 112

LS

D+J

SCI

This course will explore the biological bases of three aspects of the human condition, which are to varying degrees, also social constructs: race, gender and sexuality.  In particular, we will explore human evolution and our current understanding of how genetics and the environment interact to generate the variation we observe in these human characteristics.  Readings and discussions will be used to explore the relationships among the biological concepts, how we self-identify and how others categorize us.  In the laboratory we will explore the way science examines and measures the variation we see in these ‘traits’.  Prerequisite: High School level biology.    Class size: 20

 

92182

BIO 119

 OFTEN AWESOME: THE Science & Humanity of AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS)

Craig Jude

M  W      7:00-9:00 pm

RKC 111 / 112

LS

SCI

This course will examine the science behind Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), following the journey of one man from diagnosis through death, as told through his own words and those of his loved ones. The class will delve into the science behind his journey, examining topics that come to light along the way including genetic testing, opportunistic infections, and examining the nervous system.  The laboratory portion of the class will examine topics relating to ALS, its causes and complications including respiratory function, nerve conduction, and physiological response to stress. Students will read primary and secondary literature, as well as works about ALS for general audiences. Students will produce writing including response journals and summaries of current research, as well as develop questions about what future research will be beneficial towards treatments and possible cures.

Prerequisites: None.  Class size: 20

 

91883

BIO 157

 Food Microbiology

Gabriel Perron

 T  Th    1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 111 / 112

LS

SCI

In this course designed for intended biology majors, we will study the microorganisms that inhabit, create, or contaminate food. The first half of the course will introduce students to topics in food safety such as food spoilage, foodborne infections, and antibiotic resistance. In the second half of the course, students will learn how to harness the capabilities of the many microbes present in our environment to turn rotting vegetables or spoiling milk into delicious food. Students will also learn how next-generation technologies are revealing the important ecological dynamics shaping microbial communities in transforming food with possible beneficial effects on human health. Throughout the course, students will learn how to design, conduct, and analyze simple experiments while working with microbiology techniques, including DNA sequencing. No prerequisite. Class size: 18

 

91884

BIO 159 A

 PrincIPLES of Developmental Biology

Heather Bennett

 T   Th   1:30 -2:50 pm

   W        1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 115

RKC 114

LS

SCI

Developmental biology seeks to understand how complex organisms go from a single cell to highly developed and specialized entities.  In this course, we will focus on how organisms used in scientific research, often referred to as model organisms, develop from fertilization, including the early cellular divisions through to the formation of tissue layers and then to specialized organs. Developmental biology is a broad and a rapidly evolving field; as a result we will not cover the field in its entirety. Instead, select topics have been chosen to highlight fundamental concepts. This course provides an introduction to developmental biology and provides a foundation for more advanced biological concepts. Registration for this class will be taken in the fall. Class size: 18

 

91885

BIO 159 B

 Principles of Developmental Biology

Heather Bennett

  T   Th  3:10– 4:30 pm

      F      1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 115

RKC 114

LS

SCI

Developmental biology seeks to understand how complex organisms go from a single cell to highly developed and specialized entities.  In this course, we will focus on how organisms used in scientific research, often referred to as model organisms, develop from fertilization, including the early cellular divisions through to the formation of tissue layers and then to specialized organs. Developmental biology is a broad and a rapidly evolving field; as a result we will not cover the field in its entirety. Instead, select topics have been chosen to highlight fundamental concepts. This course provides an introduction to developmental biology and provides a foundation for more advanced biological concepts. Registration for this class will be taken in the fall. Class size: 18

 

91886

BIO 201

 Genetics and Evolution

Michael Tibbetts

M  W      8:30-11:30 am

RKC 111 / 112

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Global Public Health; Mind, Brain, Behavior This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity in eukaryotic organisms.  This course takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern molecular and genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity.  In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication,  recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to our understanding of the processes involved in generating population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can help us identify the myriad genetic and non-genetic factors influencing these traits.  The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the genetic manipulation of a model organism’s genome to address one or more topics in the course.  Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher.  Class size: 18

 

91887

BIO 202

 Ecology and Evolution

Bruce Robertson

  W  F     8:30-11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies  This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of a course in biology numbered 140 or above.  Class size: 18

 

91888

BIO 208

 Biology Seminar

Cathy Collins

   Th       12:00-1:00 pm

RKC 103

 

 

1 credit  This course will provide students with broad exposure to biology through talks by visiting speakers and Bard faculty. Students will hear about the wide-ranging research interests of invited biologists and have opportunities to interact informally with them. The course is graded Pass/Fail and students are responsible for short follow-up assignments for at least 80% of the talks. Recommended for all biology majors and other interested students.

Class size: 55

 

91889

BIO 244

 Biostatistics

Arseny Khakhalin

  W  F     1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 115

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global Public Health; Mathematics  This course introduces students to the statistical methods biologists use to describe and compare data. Students will learn methods that are appropriate for different types of data. Topics covered include elementary probability and statistics, characteristics of frequency distributions, hypothesis testing, contingency tests, correlation and regression analysis, different ways to compare means, nonparametric tests, and an introduction to multivariate tests. This course is intended for sophomore and junior biology majors, although it is open to students of all years.  One objective of the course is to provide biology majors the statistical background they need to analyze data for their own senior research; biology students should take this course before their senior year, if possible. Notice, though, that the topics in this course are applicable to many advanced courses. Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course.

Class size: 18

 

91890

BIO 303

 Microbiology

Brooke Jude

                Lab:

  M         8:30-11:30 am

  F          8:30-11:30 am

RKC 115

RKC 111 / 112

LS

SCI

This course is designed to investigate the principles of microbiology that make microbes unique. A systems based approach is taken, examining such topics as microbial cell structure and function, bacterial motility and chemotaxis, secretion systems, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and antibiotic resistance. The course examines primarily bacterial species, however a limited amount of time is devoted to the biology of eukaryotic microbes.  The laboratory portion of the course is a semester long, inquiry based, team project that involves examination of local microbial populations using culture, molecular and biochemical approaches. The class will require lab work to be completed outside of the class times. Students will analyze primary literature and produce peer reviewed research manuscripts. This course is appropriate for both those interested in a career in the health professions and those interested in ecology.  Class size: 16

 

91891

BIO 324

 Animal Physiology

Arseny Khakhalin

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

M           1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 114

LS

SCI

How do animals work? What is inside them, and more importantly, how do all those veins, membranes and tissues make it possible for animals to move, feel, and reproduce? What are the reasons for all those things to be there, and how are they different in different animals? Why do you have a spleen, and how can a crane breathe through a neck that long? Do fishes need to drink, and do they urinate? These are the kinds of questions we will tackle in this course, comparing human physiology to that of other animals; discussing how lungs, eyes, kidneys and intestines work, and putting it all in an evolutionary perspective.  Prerequisite: Upper college standing in Biology. Class size: 16

 

91892

BIO 432

 Calderwood Seminar in Biology: Distilling Biotechnology

Brooke Jude

  W         1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 200

 

 

4 credits  Tissue and organ generation, CRISPR genome editing, creation of synthetic genomes and use of modified viruses to cure deadly disease are all current biotechnological advances that only a few decades ago would have read as science fiction. These technologies developed in the lab are quickly being envisioned and applied to treating wicked problems, those that have no current universal solution. However, with these technologies come a flip side to the coin, a need for caution and care in designing experiments, evaluating data, and even execution of the technology. Deep ethical concerns exist for these technologies. This course will examine these 21st century realities, with a critical eye to addressing the boundaries of ethics, and how these boundaries may be tested by biotechnological innovations. Students will be required to read current and cutting edge primary literature, as well as learn to gather evidence for both sides of these arguments, using the scientific literature as the base. The focus of the class will be on student generated writing, peer review and editing, and clear communication with others. This course will require weekly meeting of assignment deadlines, and constructive peer editing in the production of many writing pieces pitched at a variety of audiences. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, moderation into biology, or permission of the instructor. The Calderwood Seminars are intended primarily for junior and senior majors in the field (or in some cases affiliated fields--check with the faculty member if you are unsure). They are designed to help students think about how to translate their discipline (e.g. art history, biology, literature) to non-specialists through different forms of public writing. Depending on the major, public writing might include policy papers, book reviews, blog posts, exhibition catalog entries, grant reports, or editorials. Students will be expected to write or edit one short piece of writing per week.

Class size: 12

 

91893

BIO 433

 AdvAncEd Community Ecology:   DIVERSITY

Cathy Collins

   Th       1:30-3:50 pm

RKC 200

 

 

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies  Biodiversity is a term used widely in science the media. But what is biodiversity, really? In this 4-credit course, we will rely on student-led discussions of the primary literature to explore definitions and metrics of diversity, focusing on leading theories that guide our current understanding for the mechanisms that maintain diversity. We will also explore whether biodiversity is beneficial to society; for example, by characterizing the relationship of biodiversity to ecosystem services and poverty alleviation. A significant portion of the course will be devoted to learning the computational tools for quantifying and comparing diversity across systems and spatial scales. Students will apply the concepts and analytical skills learned in the first part of the semester to a class-wide project. Writing assignments include a literature review, a project pospectus, and a piece that distills scientific information into a format for the general public. Class size: 12