18516

BGIA 301

 Core Seminar

James Ketterer

              -

 

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies  Non-state actors have gained increasing importance in international affairs. From transnational advocacy groups to terrorist networks to multinational corporations, a diverse range of actors are challenging and limiting the power of traditional nation-states and changing the landscape of the international system. This course explores the theoretical debates and practical policy effects of non-state actors in international affairs. How should we define non-state actors? Given the diversity of non-state actors and their goals, can we study them from a single perspective? Under what conditions do non-state actors "matter" and what effects do they have? What strategies do different non-state actors use to influence policy-making? What role do non-state actors play in global governance?  The goal of the course is to provide students with a working knowledge of the major academic debates and controversies about the definition, emergence and evolution of non-state actors in international affairs. We will investigate the changing roles and influence of non-state actors in a variety of issue areas, including global governance, security affairs, human rights, public health, international development and international economics, among others.  In addition, the course will contextualize students' internship experiences within this broader discussion to critically examine how ideas about the role of non-state actors in world politics play out in practice. We will take advantage of our New York City location with guest speakers from a wide spectrum of organizations within the field, such as the United Nations, US State Department, Human Rights Watch, Council on Foreign Relations, World Policy Institute, Open Society Foundation, Central American Legal Assistance, Control Risks Group, East/West Institute, Asia Society and many others. The overriding objective throughout the course is to link students' academic experience with their practical experience.  Class size: 25

 

18518

BGIA 319

 Issues in Global Public Health

Scott Rosenstein

              -

 

HA

HIST

Class size: 20

 

18519

BGIA 321

 Intelligence, Risk, and Decision Makng

Giles Alston

              -

 

SA

SSCI

Class size: 20

 

18520

BGIA 330

 Writing on International Affairs

Ilan Greenberg

              -

 

PA

PART

This course will put a heavy emphasis on reporting, writing and developing the sensibilities needed for success as an international news correspondent. We will focus heavily on the techniques of the craft, always in the context of contemporary world events and the realities of modern English-language media. A series of lecturers, and a visit to one of New York City's great newsrooms, will be included during the semester. This is not a course for purists, but rather a broad look at a varied, complex discipline. We will examine briefly many of the topics an international journalist will confront today. We also will touch upon the broadcast and Internet skills that no journalist who strives to be in interesting places at interesting times can afford to ignore in this modern world.  Class size: 20

 

18517

BGIA 337

 Making Social Change in a complex world

Stephanie Savell

              -

 

SA

SSCI

How do we address global social injustices and inequalities? There are many different avenues   joining social movements, careers in government or law, working for nonprofits or international development groups, and more. This course starts from the premise that before taking action, one must be aware of the ways that any intervention, and especially an international one, can inadvertently reproduce rather than shift structures of power. Our inquiry is rooted in social science literature on development, human rights, and humanitarianism. As part of this, we reflect on our own status and how this impacts the consequences of our actions. And then we go a step further. Building on our critical awareness, the second part of the course pivots to exploring some of the practical tools we might use to act to foster positive social change abroad. Through case studies and conversations with development practitioners, we will orient ourselves to a range of skills and approaches, from fundraising and internet advocacy to movement building, participatory action research, and social entrepreneurship. The goal is for students to leave the course with a critical yet proactive understanding of routes they might pursue to work for change. Class size: 20