19220

ARTH 102

 Perspectives in World Art II

Julia Rosenbaum

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

DIFF

This course explores the visual arts worldwide from the fourteenth century (beginning with works of what’s known as the Italian Renaissance) and ending in the 20th century. We will consider painting and sculpture alongside other media in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, arranged chronologically in order to provide a more integrated historical context for their production. The course objectives include: broad understanding of art making processes and the historical/social/artistic context of objects; knowledge of significant art historical moments and influences; concepts and vocabulary to analyze and discuss visual material. The course is designed for those students with little or no background in art history as well as for those contemplating a major in Art History and Visual Culture or in studio art. (It fulfills the 101/102 requirement for moderating into Art History and Visual Culture). Class size: 22

 

19211

ARTH 113

 History of Photography

Laurie Dahlberg

 T  Th    8:30-9:50 am

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology, Society   The discovery of photography was announced in 1839, almost simultaneously by several inventors. Born of experiments in art and science, the medium combines vision and technology. It possesses a uniquely intimate relation to the real and for this reason has many applications outside the realm of fine art; nevertheless, from its inception photography has been a vehicle for artistic aspirations. This survey of the history of photography from its earliest manifestations to the 2000s considers the medium's applications - as art, science, historical record, and document. This course is open to all students and is the prerequisite for most other courses in the history of photography. (Art History distribution: 1800-Present)

Class size: 22

 

19217

ARTH 125

 Modern Architecture I

Meredith Gaglio

 M  W     1:30 – 2:50 pm

 RKC 103

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies  This course addresses the history of modern architecture from the nineteenth century through World War II. The course will pay particular attention to the ways in which architects have responded to, and participated in, formal and aesthetic developments in other arts, as well as the role of architecture in broader technological, economic, and social-political transformations. Covering many aspects of architecture from buildings, drawings, models, exhibitions, and schools, to historical and theoretical writings and manifestoes we will investigate a range of modernist practices, polemics, and institutions. The readings, both primary and secondary texts, have been selected both to provide an overview of the history of modern architecture and to offer a number of critical and historical approaches to evaluating its legacy. Requirements include two short written assignments, a midterm, and a final exam. No prerequisites.  (Art History requirement: 1800-Present)  Class size: 22

 

19207

ARTH 145

 Byzantine Art & Architecture

Katherine Boivin

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Medieval Studies  This course serves as an introduction to the art and architecture of the Byzantine Empire.  Beginning with the reign of Constantine the Great in 324 and ending with the fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans in 1453, the course will look at art produced in the eastern Mediterranean region under successive emperors.  In addition to architecture, the course will look at mosaics, textiles, painting, city planning, manuscripts, and a range of other media.  Course requirements include two short papers as well as quizzes and exams. (Art History distribution: Ancient, European)  Class size: 22

 

19003

ARTH 160

 Survey of Latin American Art

Susan Aberth

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 205

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies  A broad overview of art and cultural production in Latin America, including South and Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The survey will commence with an examination of major pre-Columbian civilizations and a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum.  This is followed by an examination of the contact between Europe and the Americas during the colonial period, the Independence movements and art of the 19th century, and finally the search for national identity in the modern era. All students welcome.  (Art History distribution: Americas)  Class size: 22

 

19577

ARTH 228

 AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Meredith Gaglio

M  W      3:10 – 4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental and Urban Studies  Oriented around moments of ideological change, this course examines the intersection of environmental thinking and design culture in North America from the pre-colonial through contemporary eras. Its aim is to inform students of the ways in which architecture may respond to the political, social, and philosophical implications of new ecological perspectives. Topics include Native American building culture, conservationism and 19th-century landscape architecture, “vernacular modernism,” and high- versus low-tech design strategies, among others. Lectures are arranged in a loosely chronological format in order to encourage connections between environmental and architectural movements or practices. Requirements include three short written assignments and a final paper.  Class size: 22

 

19208

ARTH 249

 The Altarpiece

Katherine Boivin

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies; Theology  This course offers a thematic look at the art object called an “altarpiece.”  The altarpiece has long been central to the narrative of western art history, and much of the late medieval and Renaissance art now in museums once belonged to this type of object.  Developed in the fourteenth century as a painted or carved image program placed on an altar table, the altarpiece became a site for artistic innovation. Focusing on medieval and Renaissance examples from across Western Europe, this course explores the development, function, iconography, and art historical and liturgical significance of important altarpieces.  Where possible, it considers altarpieces in their original context.  In addition to short writing assignments, students will write two papers and give an oral presentation. (Art History distribution 1400-1800, European) Class size: 22

 

19212

ARTH 258

 Manet to Matisse

Laurie Dahlberg

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: French Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies  A social history of European painting from 1860 to 1900, beginning with the origins of modernism in the work of Manet. Topics include the rebuilding of Paris under Napoleon III, changing attitudes toward city and country in impressionist and symbolist art, and the prominent place of women in representations of modern life. (Art History distribution: European, 1800 – present). Class size: 22

 

19221

ARTH 266

 Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art

Tom Wolf

  W Th   10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 301

AA

AART

Cross-listed: American Studies  This course examines major developments in American painting and sculpture in the years following World War II.  The evolution of the New York School is studied in relation to contemporary European artistic currents, and abstract expressionism is viewed in the context of the various reactions against it following its “triumph.” Artists considered include Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Andy Warhol, as well as African American, Asian American, and women artists.  (Art History requirement: Americas, 1800 to Present)  Class size: 22

 

19209

ARTH 272

 European and American Orientalism in architecture and the visual arts, 1830s – 1930s

Olga Bush

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Middle Eastern Studies  With a focus on orientalist architecture and visual culture - painting, film and advertisement - this course will examine the Western representations of the "Orient."  We will analyze the work of writers, artists, architects and scholars in the context of encounters between the West and the East, and of the politics and ideology of European exploration, colonization, and imperialism that shaped them at particular historical junctures.  From European royal palaces, spas and street carnivals to American movie theaters, banks and smoking rooms, the "Orient" was represented, produced and consumed in competing, contradictory and complicated ways.  We will engage with scholarly texts that will inform our understanding of the complex intersections of nationalism, class, race and gender contributed to the construction of the "Orient." Coursework will include a midterm, a short class presentation, a research paper and a final."   (Art History distribution: 1800-Present)  Class size: 22

 

19213

ARTH 276

 Chinese Religious Art

Patricia Karetzky

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies   A study of religious art and architecture in China through its various dynasties. Topics include the mystical arts of ancient Sichuan, the cosmological symbolism of the Ming Tang (Hall of Enlightenment), ancient Buddhist cave temples, the evolution of Confucianism into an institutional religion, as well as the evolution of Daoist practice and contemporary popular religion.  (Art History distribution: Asia/Africa/Middle East) Class size: 22

 

19216

ARTH 282

 Animals and Animality in the visual culture of early modern europe

Susan Merriam

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Human Rights; Science, Technology & Society   This course examines how animals and their representations shaped ideas about what it meant to be human in early modern Europe. While some philosophers and theologians during this time postulated the superiority of humans to animals, other thinkers expressed uncertainty about the status of humans. Over the course of the semester we will study paintings, prints, sculpture, textiles, and decorative and food arts where this uncertainty is articulated. Specifically, we will focus on the ways in which the human-animal boundary is tested, explored, or delimited in zoos and menageries, scientific illustration, taxidermy, physiognomic studies, hunting and hunting scenes, still life paintings, depictions of fables, myths, and history in which animals play a central role, elaborate banquets featuring animals, and representations of domesticated pets and livestock. Short writing assignments, a research paper, a presentation, and a museum visit required.  (Art History distribution 1400-1800, European).  Class size: 15

 

19222

ARTH 315

 Interior Worlds: TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY AMERICAN DECORATIVE ARTS AND MATERIAL CULTURE

Julia Rosenbaum

    F        10:10-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: American Studies; Experimental Humanities  How does the world of interior spaces, their furnishings and decorative objects, tell us stories, assert values, project identities? Through an engaged-learning experience with three early twentieth-century National Park sites in the Hudson Valley—the Vanderbilt Mansion, the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Eleanor Roosevelt’s Home at Val-Kill—this seminar explores both the relationship between objects and identities and issues of consumption and appearance. The course will focus on American decorative arts from the late nineteenth into the twentieth century addressing theories about the purpose, meaning, and value of design and decoration as well as key movements, designers, and artists. Visiting the sites and collections regularly, we will combine the scholarly study of aesthetic ideals and social practices with hands-on examination of specific objects in the Vanderbilt and Roosevelt museum collections. Final research projects may involve individual or group curated digital exhibitions.  Sophomores can enroll with permission of the professor. (Art History requirement: Americas, 1800 to Present)  Class size: 15

 

19569

ARTH 339

 THE HANDMAIDEN’S TALE: PHOTOGRAPHY AND ART IN THE 19th CENTURY

Laurie Dahlberg

   W        10:10-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Photography, branded “the handmaiden to art" and "the bastard child of art and science" by early commentators, has followed a tortured path into the precincts of fine art, and this course explores that unusual history. This seminar will include weekly reading that will form the basis for lively and informed discussion, writing assignments leading to a significant research paper, and small group work leading to the creation of a collective portfolio of photo-based work inspired by 19th century photography. Prerequisite: ARTH 113 or an upper level art history course.    Class size: 15

 

19214

ARTH 344

 Minimalism and Postminimalism

Alex Kitnick

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

CCS

AA

AART

This course will examine the artworks and writings of key minimalist and postminimalist artists, such as Carl Andre, Lynda Benglis, Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, and Robert Morris, as well as the larger conceptual investments that propelled their work. While these artists never banded together as a group, their practices share a number of commonalities. Their emphasis on surface, scale, and standardized form brings attention to the work’s surroundings as well as the body of the viewer encountering the work. Taking such as ideas as starting points this course will also examine practices including Judson Church dance, the Light and Space movement, serial music, and developments in process art. In addition to the resources at Bard’s Center for Curatorial Studies, the course will also make use of local sites, such as Dia: Beacon. The course will conclude by examining how Minimalism’s engagement with space has impacted contemporary art. (Art History distribution: 1800-present)   Class size: 15

 

19223

ARTH 348

 Asian American Artists Seminar

Tom Wolf

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Asian Studies  In recent years there has been increasing interest in artists of Asian ancestry who have worked in the United States. The relationships between the artistic traditions of their native lands and their subsequent immersion in American culture provide material for fascinating inquiries concerning biography, style, subject matter, and politics. This class will examine artists active in the United States in the first half of the twentieth century as well as contemporary artists.  We will take one or two trips to New York City to see art by Asian American artists, and the class will read several works of fiction by Asian American writers to supplement the art history readings.  Students will give presentations about selected artists either historic or recent. Key artists studied will include Isamu Noguchi, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Yun Gee, Yayoi Kusama, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Patty Chang, Nikki Lee and Mariko Mori. (Art History requirement: Americas, 1800 to Present)  Class size: 15

 

19215

ARTH 385

 Theories and Methods of Art History

Alex Kitnick

M           1:30-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

This seminar, designed primarily for art history majors, helps students develop the ability to think critically about a range of different approaches to the field of art history. Students read and discuss a variety of texts in order to become familiar with the discipline’s development. Methodologies such as connoisseurship, cultural history, Marxism, feminism, and post-modernism are analyzed. (Art History required class)  Class size: 15

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

19205

IDEA 221

 alchemy: from magic to science

Susan Aberth

Bruce Chilton

 T  Th  3:10 pm – 5:30 pm

RKC 103

 

AA

MBV

AART

HUM

Cross-listed: Art History, Religion  6 credits Far from being considered an antiquated relic, the ideas and allegories expressed in alchemy continue to influence global contemporary culture in areas as diverse as gender studies, critical theory and the renewed interest in esoteric subjects. Is alchemy a scientific pursuit or a religious or spiritual one? This Big Ideas course provides a multifaceted exploration of the history of alchemy in thought, practice and art. Isaac Newton, an active alchemist, translated the Latin text that set out his own basic conviction: “That which is below is like that which is above & that which is above is like that which is below.” Alchemy asserts that all elements and forces of the universe are related, and that human beings are capable of understanding and influencing their relationship to one another. One result was the now famous quest to turn ordinary metals into gold. But alchemy during the several thousand years of its history has been applied in many different ways. It has embraced fundamental philosophical currents, contributing distinctive worldviews that remain current in global culture. Alchemy has always been intimately related to artistic practice and this class will provide a survey of works pertaining to alchemical processes ranging from medieval manuscripts to the modern era, from Surrealism to the latest contemporary art. There will be a number of film screenings and guest lectures associated with the course, i.e. from the History of Science, a modern-day practitioner of alchemy, contemporary artists, and others. Course requirements will include a number of research papers corresponding to the various components of the class.   Class size: 25

19171

LIT 231

 Art/Aesthetic/Modern Arab Wrld

Dina Ramadan

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 202

FL

D+J

FLLC

Cross-listed: Art History; Human Rights; Middle Eastern Studies