18201

ARTH 102

 Perspectives in World Art II

Julia Rosenbaum

M  W   3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

DIFF

This course explores the visual arts worldwide from the fourteenth century (beginning with the European Renaissance in Italy) and ending in the 20th century. We will concentrate primarily on painting and sculpture, along with some architecture and consider works from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, arranged chronologically in order to provide a more integrated historical context for their production. The course objectives include knowledge of significant works of art and styles, broad understanding of art making processes and the historical/social/artistic context of objects, and the vocabulary and language to talk and write about visual material. Designed for students with little or no background in art history, as well as for those who may be contemplating a major in art history or studio.  Open to all students: first and second year students are especially encouraged to enroll. (Art History requirement: ARTH 101 or 102)  Class size: 22

 

18197

ARTH 113

 History of Photography

Laurie Dahlberg

M  W   8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology, Society  The discovery of photography was announced in 1839, almost simultaneously by several inventors. Born of experiments in art and science, the medium combines vision and technology. It possesses a uniquely intimate relation to the real and for this reason has many applications outside the realm of fine art; nevertheless, from its inception photography has been a vehicle for artistic aspirations. This survey of the history of photography from its earliest manifestations to the 2000s considers the medium's applications - as art, science, historical record, and document. This course is open to all students and is the prerequisite for most other courses in the history of photography.  Art History distribution: Modern

Class size: 22

 

18204

ARTH 114

 History of the Decorative Arts

Tom Wolf

  W Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Science, Technology, Society    A survey of decorative arts from the rococo period to postmodernism. Students explore the evolution of historical styles as they appear in furniture, interiors, fashion, ceramics, metalwork, and graphic and industrial design. Objects are evaluated in their historical contexts, and formal, technical,  Art History distribution: Modern  Class size: 22

 

18203

ARTH 126

 Modern Architecture ii: GOING GLOBAL 1930 - 1990

Olga Touloumi

M  W   1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Related interest: Environmental & Urban Studies  What happened to modern architecture when it went global? How did modern architecture become the image of internationalism and globalization? This class covers major twentieth century architectural movements and urban projects, setting in dialogue early avant-garde movements, such as the Deutsche Werkbund, Futurism, and the Bauhaus, with the later architectural groups and movements that transformed modern architecture into a universal formal language such as Team X, Brutalism, the Metabolists, Postmodernism, and Deconstruction. We will be asking what happened to modern architecture when the philosophical and aesthetic inquiries for an appropriately modern form of life met with the challenges of an increasingly internationalized world, post-World War II housing demands, decolonization, corporate capitalism, social movements, and a newly founded partnership with the military-industrial complex. Major figures discussed include Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Oscar Niemeyer, Lina bo Bardi, Aldo van Eyck, Jane Drew and Maxwell Fry, Jaqueline Tyrwhitt, Arata Isozaki, Kenzo Tange, Constantinos Doxiadis, Archigram, Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, Aldo Rossi, Peter Eisenman, Zaha Hadid. Assignments include short writing assignments, a Halloween costume ball (beware of the catch), a final paper on architecture, as well as midterm and final exams. Art History distribution: Modern  Class size: 22

 

18192

ARTH 160

 Survey of Latin American Art

Susan Aberth

 T  Th  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 205

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Latin American Studies  A broad overview of art and cultural production in Latin America, including South and Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The survey will commence with an examination of major pre-Columbian civilizations and a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum.  This is followed by an examination of the contact between Europe and the Americas during the colonial period, the Independence movements and art of the 19th century, and finally the search for national identity in the modern era. All students welcome. Art History distribution: American  Class size: 22

 

18288

ARTH 193

 Arts of Japan

Patricia Karetzky

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

This course beings with a study of the Neolithic period and its cord-impressed pottery circa 2000 B.C.E., when Japanese cultural and aesthetic characteristics were already observable.  Next, the great wave of Chinese influence is considered, including its impact on government, religion (Buddhism), architecture and art.  Subsequent periods of indigenous art in esoteric and popular Buddhism, Shinto, narrative scroll painting, medieval screen panting, Zen art, and ukoy-e prints are presented in a broad view of the social, artistic, and historical development of Japan.  Art History distribution:  Asia  Class size: 22

 

18199

ARTH 210

 Roman Art and Architecture

Diana DePardo-Minsky

 T  Th  3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Classical Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Italian Studies  This class follows the development of Roman art and architecture from the founding of the city by Romulus in 753 BCE to the transferal of the capital by Constantine in 330 CE.  Lectures explore how Romans incorporated and synthesized the styles and achievements of conquered peoples (including the Etruscans, Greeks, and Egyptians) to produce a complex visual vocabulary which articulated the nature of their Empire and established a common artistic language throughout the Mediterranean world.  This language eventually provided the foundation for Christian Iconography.  Requirements include a semester-long term paper (turned in at three intervals), a mid-term, a final, and quizzes.  Completion of this class qualifies students for consideration for Roma in Situ (ArtH 312; 8 credits), an intensive and advanced seminar taught in Rome during January of 2020 and completed at Bard in the following Spring semester.  Art History distributions: European and ancient to 1400. Open to all students.  Class size: 22

 

18413

ARTH 216

Leonardo da Vinci and Italian Renaissance Iconography

Diana DePardo-Minsky

M  W   3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 205

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Italian Studies  This class examines how Leonardo's oeuvre revolutionized Renaissance iconography.  It posits that Leonardo’s curiosity about natural phenomenon coupled with his belief in human capacity prompted him to transform the parameters of female portraiture and of religious images.  The first half of the course situates Leonardo’s drawings and paintings within contemporary Florentine art, while the second half provides an in-depth analysis of Leonardo’s Last Supper.  Leo Steinberg's Sexuality of Christ (1983) helps explain the ramification of Franciscan theology on quattrocento images, while his Leonardo's Incessant Last Supper (2000) serves as the focal text for the exploration of the Milanese mural.  Addition readings include primary sources by Vasari and Leonardo himself and secondary interpretations written by Goethe, Freud, Panofsky, Clark, Kemp, Pedretti, and Bambach.  Requirements include class presentations, critical essays, and quizzes.  Some knowledge of Renaissance art, literature, or culture will prove helpful.  Art History distributions: European and 1400-1800.  Open to all students.  Class size: 22

 

18196

ARTH 217

 Islamic Art & Architecture

Olga Bush

 T  Th  11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Middle Eastern Studies  This course is designed to familiarize students with the evolution of Islamic art and architecture in different regions of the medieval Islamic World (Spain, North Africa, Middle East and Central Asia) from the 7th to the 15th century.  It will examine the establishment of Islamic traditions of visual identity in the context of territorial expansion and political shifts that resulted in multi-cultural and multi-religious settings.  Issues concerning function, patronage, and the exchange of intellectual and artistic ideas will be explored through the study of varied types of architecture (palace, mosque, madrasa, tomb) and portable arts (ceramics, metalwork, textiles and books). Class size: 22  Art History distribution: Middle East, Ancient.  Class size: 22

 

18503

ARTH 252

 History of the Experiment

Gretta Tritch Roman

M  W   11:50 am-1:10 pm

RKC 100

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities   The scientific method and the modern form of the scientific experiment are arguably the most powerful innovations of the modern period. Although dating back in its modern form to only the sixteenth century, the concept of the experiment as an attempt to find underlying continuities in experience has numerous origins stretching back to earliest recorded history. In turn, artistic culture both enabled the development of experimental thought and functioned as a site to test alternatives. Throughout, we will examine the concept of experiment as closely connected with how a particular era understood “experience,” and locate the epistemological problem of the experiment in a broader, extra-scientific framework. Alongside foundational scientific texts by Aristotle, Lucretius, Descartes, Leibniz, Newton, Darwin, Curie, Tesla, Einstein, Schroedinger, Pasteur, and others, we will also consider experiments in architecture and urbanism as case studies in how “experiment” and “experimentation” have been defined in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and European contexts. As a major component of the course, we will conduct our own experiments in replicability. This course is required for those who wish to concentrate in Experimental Humanities.  Class size: 22

 

18193

ARTH 255

 Outsider Art

Susan Aberth

 T  Th  4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLIN 205

AA

AART

The term "Outsider Art" is a problematic umbrella under which are grouped a variety of difficult to categorize artistic practices. This class will first examine the use of terminology such as outsider, naïve, and visionary, as well as groupings such as art brut, folk art, art of the insane, and even popular culture. We will pursue relevant questions such as: what exactly are the criteria for inclusion in such categories, do art markets drive this labeling, how does this work function within the art world, are categorical borders crossed in order to fit the needs of exhibiting institutions, and finally how has Outsider Art impacted mainstream modern and contemporary art and are the dividing lines between the two still relevant? We will look at artwork produced within certain institutional settings such as mental asylums and prisons, as well as that produced by mediums, spiritualists and other "visionaries" working within what can be best described as a "folk art" category.   Art History distribution: Modern Class size: 25

 

18202

ARTH 278

 Modern in America: art and social politics

Julia Rosenbaum

 T  Th  11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: American Studies  This course concentrates on early twentieth-century artists and art movements in the United States, from Winslow Homer to Georgia O’Keeffe to Jackson Pollock, from the Ashcan School to the ‘Harlem Renaissance’ to Abstract Expressionism. How have artists understood their work as modern? What have artists and critics meant when they talked about realism and abstraction? In a period shaped by two world wars, Jim Crow laws, and women’s suffrage, how did artists respond to social injustice and warfare? Covering a range of media and genres, we will explore these and other questions about art making in the context of social and political events. Topics include: ‘modernity’ and nationalism; technology and art; exhibitions and cultural propaganda; artistic identity and gender and racial roles; public art, murals, and social activism.  Art History distribution: America, Modern  Class size: 22

 

18504

ARTH 307

 Contested Spaces

Olga Touloumi

  W      10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Experimental Humanities; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Human Rights During the 19th and 20th century, streets, kitchens, schools, and ghettos were the spaces of political conflict and social transformation. Often these spaces are studied as sites of contestation, where old pedagogical, medical, institutional paradigms witness the emergence of new. This course will focus on these spaces of contestation and discuss how objects and buildings in dialogue construct new ideas about class, gender, and race. Readings by Chantal Mouffee, Hannah Arendt, Antony Vidler, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Michel Foucault will provide us with analytical tools and theoretical frameworks to address those actors excluded from history, problematizing agency and authorship in art and architecture. The class assignments include weekly responses, collaborative projects on the course website, and a final paper. The first installment of the class will be taught in collaboration with the University of Michigan and Michigan State University. The course will culminate in a field trip to Detroit and a weekend conference that will bring the three classes together. Art History distribution: 1800-Present. 

Art History distribution: Modern  Class size: 15

 

18523

ARTH 325

 Ex Votos

Ittai Weinryb

   Th    1:30 pm-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

An ex voto is a votive offering to a saint or deity. It is given as a token of gratitude for a miracle performed and in some cases it is offered as a vow. The ex voto is the most basic and fundamental form of material exchange between humans and deities. Almost anything, regardless of size, weight, form, or original function, can become a votive object once it is offered with intent. In its essence the votive offering is a material object that celebrates an immaterial event, a physical object that commemorates or expects supernatural activity. From archaic Greece to modernity and from the Himalayan slopes to the forests of Brazil, votive offerings are the most universal practice in the history of mankind. This seminar is set to explore the relationship between humans and deities across cultures through the basic act of votive exchange. Issues relating to participation by devotees will be considered as the basis for the seminar, as well as theories from fields of history of religion, art history, anthropology and economics. Together they will serve to examine and further our understanding of the unique phenomenon of the votive giving. The seminar is given as part of the planning of the exhibition Agents of Faith: Votive Giving Across Cultures, scheduled to open in the Bard Graduate Center Gallery in New York in September 2018 and some of the sessions in the seminar will be devoted to curatorial issues involved in the mounting of the exhibition. Open to Upper College students. Class size: 15

 

18195

ARTH 337

 Pop Art

Alex Kitnick

 T        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities This course looks at Pop Art as a series of exchanges between the fine arts and mass culture; it also examines Pop as a way of responding to the increased dominance of global capital in the postwar period. The course progresses through a number of case studies, beginning with the emergence of Pop Art in England in the late 1950s. It will continue by examining Pop movements throughout the USGermany, and South America in the 1960s. In addition to painting and sculpture, the course will examine Pop through a wide variety of media, including movies, music, and books. Artists covered in the course include EvelyneAxell, Richard Hamilton, CildoMeireles, Gerhard Richter, and Andy Warhol. Students will turn in one-page reading responses each week. Two longer papers are also required: the first, an expanded version of a response paper, is due at the midterm. The final research essay will be due at the end of the semester.  Art History distribution: Modern Class size: 15

 

18205

ARTH 360

 Fin de Siecle

Tom Wolf

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

HDR 106

AA

AART

Students examine developments in the fine and decorative arts in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Europe and the United States.  Topics include the antirealist reaction of artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, and Aubrey Beardsley; the development of the Arts and Crafts movement; photography at the turn of the century; fashion of the period; the growth of feminism; and the relationship between the Arts and Crafts movement, the Vienna Werkstadt, Jugenstil, and Art Nouveau.  There will be several field trips and students will write two papers and

give two short in class presentations. Art History distribution: Modern  Class size: 15

 

18194

ARTH 375

 Mexican Muralism

Susan Aberth

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies, Human Rights, Latin American Studies   This course considers the Mexican Mural Movement’s philosophical origins in the decades following the Mexican Revolution.  The murals of José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros will be examined in detail, as well as the work of lesser-known Mexican muralists. Also considered is the Mexican Mural Movement’s wide-ranging impact on murals executed under the WPA in the United States, in Nicaragua during the 1970s, and in urban Chicano communities.  In addition we will survey other types of wall painting, from graffiti and street art to the work of contemporary artists such as Sol Lewitt, Keith Haring, and Kara Walker. Prerequisite: Art History 101-102, or 160 or permission of the instructor.  Art History distribution: Americas, Modern  Class size: 15

 

18198

ARTH 385

 Theories and Methods of Art History

Laurie Dahlberg

 T        10:10 am-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

This seminar, designed primarily for art history majors, helps students develop the ability to think critically about a range of different approaches to the field of art history. Students read and discuss a variety of texts in order to become familiar with the discipline’s development. Methodologies such as connoisseurship, cultural history, Marxism, feminism, and post-modernism are analyzed. (Art History required class) Class size: 15

 

 

Cross-listed courses:

 

18138

IDEA 225

 1989: Art, LitERATURE & Politics IN  Transition

Alex Kitnick

Thomas Wild

M  W   1:30 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 201

AA

LA

AART

ELIT

Cross-listed: Art History; German  Studies   8 credits  According to the political scientist Francis Fukuyama 1989 marked the “end of history.” The so-called triumph of Western-style capitalism and liberal democracy, frequently represented by the fall of the Berlin Wall, meant that there would be no more struggle and no more contestation: a single ideology would now dominate the world. But is this true? Today we find ourselves in a world in urgent need of re-imagining the ways we wish to live together. Does the current historical moment of 2017 with its re-emergence of aggressive nationalism, authoritarian government, and threat to plurality confront us with another turning point to possibly bookend the momentum of opening, diversity, and new beginnings after 1989? This course will seek to map the connections between post-1989 practices and their wider historical moment up to the present. We will discuss, among others, artworks by Hans Haacke, Hito Steyerl, and Ilya Kabakov, poetry and prose by Ingo Schulze, Terezia Mora, and Nobel Prize winner Herta Müller as well as theoretical writings by Bruno Latour, Jean-Luc Nancy, William Kentridge, and Édouard Glissant. The class will scrutinize pivotal films created in response to 1989, and we will visit with contemporary artists and filmmakers. In concert with our weekly class conversations, this course will foster various formats of presentations and collaborative work, combining analytical and creative modes of engaging with the diverse materials.

Class size: 22

 

18528

IDEA 215

 OF Utopias

Kevin Duong

Olga Touloumi

 T Th   10:10am-12:30pm

HEG 204

AA

SA

AART

SSCI

Cross-listed: Art History, Environmental & Urban Studies, Experimental Humanities, Political Studies

6 credits  This class explores the theory and practice of utopia from an interdisciplinary perspective. Utopias have always been imagined through a variety of mediums like the manifesto, the blueprint, and visual and performing arts. The course investigates the manifold scales of utopian articulation and realization, from tiny communities to project designing the entire globe. Combining the history of political thought and architectural history, the class will use the concept of utopia to map out the ways that men and women have sought to transform the spatial, psychic, and social landscapes they inhabited. What can we learn from the utopian imperative? What is the shape of utopia? How should we understand the relationship between thought and practice, hope and disappointment, idealism and realism? Projects presented range from early industrial colonies, socialist utopias, Christian communities, and anarchist utopias to settlement housing, shopping malls, and factories. The projects will be discussed in conjunction with major texts by Sir Thomas More, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Karl Marx, Robert Owen, Louis Marin, to name a few. Apart from regular writing assignments, students will engage with creative designs, building toward a final exhibition of design projects for future utopias. The course will include a field trip to Shaker’s Village.  Class size: 22