92005

ARTH 101

 Perspectives in World Art

Katherine Boivin

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  Perspectives in World Art introduces the diversity of the visual arts worldwide over the course of two semesters. Students may take either semester or both. The first semester examines painting, sculpture, architecture, and other artifacts from the Paleolithic period through the 14th century. Works from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas are studied chronologically to create an integrated historical context. Readings from various critical perspectives present different methodological approaches. Requirements include two papers, a mid-term, a final, and quizzes. This course fulfills one requirement for moderating into Art History; potential majors are urged to take Perspectives prior to other Art History classes. Open to all students. Class size: 25

 

92013

ARTH 122

 Survey of African Art

Susan Aberth

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 205

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Latin American Studies This introductory course surveys the vast array of art forms created on the African continent from the prehistoric era to the present, as well as arts of the diaspora in Brazil, the Americas, and Haiti. In addition to sculpture, masks, architecture and metalwork, we will examine beadwork, textiles, jewelry, house painting, pottery, and other decorative arts. Some of the topics to be explored will be implements of divination, royal regalia, the role of performance, music and dance, funerary practices, and the incorporation of western motifs and materials. Because art and visual culture most deeply reveal the aesthetic, spiritual and social values of a people, this course fulfills the Rethinking Difference requirement.  We will examine the ways in which objects, performances, regalia and other forms designed for visual consumption work together in African societies to create a cohesive sense of identity and belonging to community members. All students welcome.  Art History Distribution: Africa.

Class size: 22

 

92004

ARTH 123

 Survey: 20th Century Art

Alex Kitnick

M  W      1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

A survey of the major movements of modern art, beginning with postimpressionism in the late 19th century and moving through fauvism, expressionism, cubism, futurism, constructivism, Dadaism, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, and minimalism. Painting and sculpture are emphasized.

Art History distribution: Modern /Europe.  Class size: 22

 

92697

ARTH 127

 TALKING ARCHITECTURE

Deepa Ramaswany

 T  Th    11:50  – 1:10 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

2-credits, starting mid-October  The course will introduce the various methods by which we experience, analyze, judge, enjoy and criticize architecture and the built environment. The purpose of the course will be to sharpen both our eyes and our critical voices.The class will work with architectural projects—built and unbuilt, beautiful and ugly, successful and unsuccessful—from the 20th century. Topics will include architecture’s intersection with history, preservation, sustainability, materiality, corporations, art, landscape and planning. Each week will focus on close readings of a single text.  The course will require two writing assignments and class participation.  Class size: 22  

 

92003

ARTH 130

 Monet to mugshots: IntroDUCTION to Visual material

Julia Rosenbaum

M  W      11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

Looking isn’t as easy as it looks    (Ad Reinhardt, early 20thc. artist)

It is only shallow people who do not judge by appearances. The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible.   (Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, chap. 2)

This course constitutes an introduction to the discipline of art history and to visual artifacts more broadly defined. It teaches students to look at, think about, and analyze or interpret visual material. We will focus on different types of visual “texts,” from monuments to media advertising, considering how they communicate through style, medium, genre, or display strategies, and how the visual can convey meaning, whether political, personal, or social. Thinking about images goes hand in hand with writing about them. The short writing assignments and the essays that you will work on over the semester are designed to strengthen your interpretative skills and help you become a more persuasive and effective writer and observer.

Class size: 22

 

92008

ARTH 247

 Photography since 1950

Laurie Dahlberg

 T  Th    10:10-11:30 am

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Photography;Science, Technology & Society. In the decades after World War II, photography’s social and artistic roles changed in many ways. The 1950s saw the dominance of magazine photography in Life and Lookand witnessed the birth of a more personal photographic culture, exemplified by Robert Frank’s book The Americans. In the 1960s and 1970s, photographers such as Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand, and Lee Friedlander created a new view of contemporary life from moments gathered in the streets and from private lives. Beginning in the late 70s, artists trained outside of traditional photography began to employ the camera for wholly different purposes, using photography to pose ideological questions about images and image-making in a media-saturated culture. Today, the transformation of photography through digital technology has again thrown the meaning(s) of photographically-derived images into question. This lecture/discussion class will cover the historical context of this period and tease out fundamental issues of photography and its ostensible nature and the politics of representation. Student performance will be evaluated in class discussion, exams, and papers. No prerequisites, but preference will be given to moderated photography and moderated art history students. Art History Distribution: Modern. Class size: 22

 

92161

ARTH 257

 Art in the Age of Revolution

Laurie Dahlberg

 T  Th    1:30-2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: French Studies; Victorian Studies A social history beginning with the art of the pre-Revolutionary period and ending with realism. Major topics include changing definitions of neoclassicism and romanticism; the impact of the revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848; the Napoleonic presence abroad; the shift from history painting to scenes of everyday life; landscape painting as an autonomous art form; and attitudes toward race and sexuality. Emphasis is placed on French artists such as Corot, Courbet, David, Delacroix, Gericault, Greuze, Ingres, and Vige-Lebrun; Constable, Friedrich, Goya, and Turner are also considered. Art History distributions: Modern/Europe   Class size: 20

 

92160

ARTH 265

 Dada and Surrealism

Tom Wolf

  W Th   10:10-11:30 am

OLIN 301

AA

AART

A survey of the two major artistic movements following World War I in Europe. Introductory lectures on the earlier modernist movements in Paris, particularly cubism, are followed by a study of the iconoclastic art of dadaists such as Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, and Hans Arp. The course concludes with an examination of the surrealist group, including Joan Miro, Andre Masson, Max Ernst, and Rene Magritte and Salvador Dali.  Art History Distribution: Europe/Modern,  Class size: 20

 

92364

ARTH 268

 POSTWAR MODERNISM: BUILDINGS, CONTEXTS AND GLOBAL SHIFTS

Deepa Ramaswany

  T   Th   3:10 pm – 4:30 pm

OLIN 204

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies 

2-credits, starting mid-October  This course looks at architecture in the postwar years between 1945 and 1973. This was a historic moment defined by shifts at a global scale (decolonization, migration, birth of new nation states, urban renewal). How did these global shifts shape design and architecture?  We will look at postwar architecture from all over the world, including Brasilia, Chandigarh, St. Louis, New York, London, Marseilles, Casablanca. Course material will be thematically organized around broad themes that defined postwar modernism: systems theory and media theory; environmentalism and sustainability; housing and the Pruitt Igoe problem; rise of Tropical Architecture, Postmodernism, etc. Key figures will be CIAM, TEAM X, Archigram, Doxiadis, José Luis Sert, Smithsons, Shadrach Woods, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Minette Di Silva, Robert Moses, among others. Along with regular writing assignments, students will engage with the idea of context and object by working with an architectural building of their choice, which will build toward a final presentation and discussion. Art History Distribution: 1800-present   Class size: 22

 

92012

ARTH 273

 Religious Imagery IN Latin AmericA

Susan Aberth

 T  Th    4:40-6:00 pm

OLIN 205

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies; Latin American Studies  This course will explore the varied visual manifestations of religious expression in Latin America after the Spanish Conquest. Although Spanish missionaries originally employed art and architecture as conversion tools, Latin America ultimately developed unique kinds of Catholic imagery and building types. One of the topics discussed at length will be the Virgin of Guadalupe and the use of her image as a tool for building national identity in Mexico, as well as for other political and cultural movements. In addition to conventional churches, statuary and paintings, we will examine folk art traditions such as popular saints and cults, masked performances, and shamanic beliefs tied to healing. A significant portion of the course will deal with African diasporic religions such as Candomble and Santera as practiced in Brazil, the Caribbean and the United States. A significant portion of this course will be dedicated to contemporary art and practices. In addition to reading and viewing documentary films, students will be asked to execute and present a number of art projects such as altars, ex-votos, etc. Students who have taken my Survey of Latin American Art will be given preference, but all are welcome to enroll.  Art History Distribution: The Americas,  Class size: 22

 

92109

ARTH 287

 Experiments: Art & Technology

Alex Kitnick

M  W      3:10-4:30 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities This course will explore various connections between art and technology from the 1960s up to the present day. Students will examine a wide range of writings, artworks, performances, and videos by figures including Marshall McLuhan, John McHale, Robert Rauschenberg, and Carolee Schneemann. The idea of the course is to show that both artists and theorists are involved in a common project of responding to new technologies. Questions of distribution, audience, and globalization will be of key concern. In the last weeks, we will consider how these ideas have evolved in the age of the Internet. Open to all students. Students will work on various writing assignments and class presentations. Art History Distribution: Modern, Class size: 22

 

92162

ARTH 290

 Chinese Art

Patricia Karetzky

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies This survey begins with Neolithic painted pottery, the earliest expression of the Chinese aesthetic. Next, the early culture of the Bronze Age is reviewed, followed by the unification of China by the first emperor, the owner of 8,000 life-sized clay figurines. In the fifth century Buddhist art achieved expression in colossal sculptures carved from living rock and in paintings of paradise. Confucian and Taoist philosophy, literature, and popular culture are examined through the paintings of the later dynasties, with an emphasis on landscape painting. The course ends with a consideration of 20th century art. Art History Distribution: Asia. Class size: 22

 

92014

ARTH 326

CALDERWOOD SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY: making publics:  Early Modern Art in the Contemporary  World

Susan Merriam

   Th       1:30-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

This seminar examines how museums, galleries, art critics and art historians shape popular understanding of art  created between 1500 and 1750. We will focus primarily on art produced in northern Europe, using select case studies including Bosch, Holbein, Vermeer, Rembrandt and Rubens to examine the following questions: How do art historians and critics translate older works of art, many of which seem unfamiliar or strange, for the public? How do scholars and critics distill complex academic arguments into appealing, accessible prose? What types of academic art history texts, focused on early modern work, are reviewed in popular forums? How does one write about early modern art within a journal—such as ArtForum—dedicated primarily to contemporary art?  In what ways do museums use language in the form of catalogues, wall text, and online platforms to engage audiences? In addition to these questions, we will consider the role the internet has played in introducing new constituencies to works produced in our period, and analyze how critical writing helps determine the market for art. Because this is a writing-intensive course, students should be prepared to do weekly writing or peer editing. Primarily for moderated art history students. Primarily for moderated art history majors. Art History Distribution: 1400-1800, Europe. The Calderwood Seminars are intended primarily for junior and senior majors in the field (or in some cases affiliated fields--check with the faculty member if you are unsure). They are designed to help students think about how to translate their discipline (e.g. art history, biology, literature) to non-specialists through different forms of public writing. Depending on the major, public writing might include policy papers, book reviews, blog posts, exhibition catalog entries, grant reports, or editorials. Students will be expected to write or edit one short piece of writing per week. Class size: 12

 

92006

ARTH 328

 Visual Culture: Medieval Death

Katherine Boivin

  W         10:10-12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

In many ways, commemoration of the dead was central to medieval culture. Cemeteries were situated in the centers of towns, tomb effigies and plaques filled churches, and the bodies of saints provided a link between the earthy and heavenly realms. This seminar looks at visual materials related to the theme of death, including among others architecture, tomb sculpture, manuscript illumination, and reliquaries. It concentrates on art and architecture produced in Western Europe between 1100 and 1500. The course will be discussion-based and include a final 15-page research paper. AH Distribution requirement: Ancient/Europe.   Class size: 15

 

92007

ARTH 340

 Seminar in Contemporary Art

Tom Wolf

  W         1:30-3:50 pm

HDR 101A

AA

AART

A consideration of the history of recent art, beginning with a short survey of the minimalism of the 1960s and then focusing on subsequent artistic developments through the early 21st century.  The class meets in New York City every fourth week to view current exhibitions.   Students give presentations about selected artists and topics to the class. Art History Distribution: Modern,  Class size: 15

 

92295

ARTH 352

 CITIES AND PHOTOGRAPHY

Luc Sante

  T          1:30-3:50 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies   Although it took a few decades for the speed of photography to catch up to the speed of the city, the two have been inseparable since at least 1900. The pairing virtually defined photography in the twentieth century. Now that we are in the twenty-first, however, their union is once again in question, for reasons that range from ethical and political considerations to formal exhaustion. We will examine the record and ponder the conundrums. Major photographers include Annan, Marville, Riis, Atget, Brassa, Abbott, Alvarez Bravo, Weegee, Levitt, Klein, Arbus, Winogrand, Moriyama, Shore, diCorcia. Art History Distribution: Modern. Class size: 15

 

92010

ARTH 385

 Theories and methods of Art History

Susan Merriam

 T           1:30-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

This seminar, designed primarily for art history majors, helps students develop the ability to think critically about a range of different approaches to the field of art history. Students read and discuss a variety of texts in order to become familiar with the discipline’s development. Methodologies such as connoisseurship, cultural history, Marxism, feminism, and post-modernism are analyzed. (Art History requirement: Required)  Class size: 15