BARD COLLEGE COURSE LIST ADDENDUM, FALL 2018

 

New courses:

 

92468

LIT 305

 AFRICAN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN NEO SLAVE NARRATIVES

Ena Harris

   Th       4:40 – 7:00 pm

OLIN 309

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

Cross-listed: American Studies; Human Rights  This course has two inter-connected goals: to engage students in sustained literary analysis of “neo-slave narratives” while learning about the major ideas of “critical race theory.” Neo slave narratives are texts by contemporary writers who seek to re-imagine experiences of enslavement, often from multiple perspectives. In so doing, they provide powerful and insightful renditions of the institution of slavery and its impact not only on the enslaved but the enslavers as well. By weaving in various critical essays that examine constructions of race as they relates to power, control, and the law, we will grapple with the realities of crafted identities. The larger challenge is to arrive at a more complex understanding of the history of slavery and race in America via historical fiction and to have painful yet necessary conversations about how these ideas impact our lives.We will read texts [short stories, novels, essays] by Maryse Conde (Guadeloupe), Fred D’Aguiar (Guyana), Caryl Phillips (St. Kitts), James Baldwin (New York, USA), Richard Dyer (England), Ian F. Haney Lopez (Hawaii, USA), Paulo Freire (Brazil), and others.  Class size: 15

 

92428

LIT 306

 BLACK FEMINIST THEORY AND PRACTICE: NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH

Brittney Edmonds

   W        1:30 – 3:50 pm

Barringer House

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: American Studies; Gender & Sexuality Studies This interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to past and contemporary expressions of black feminist thought. Through readings of works of literature, visual culture, music and theoretical texts from a variety of disciplines, we will explore how black feminist writers, artists, scholars and activists address and represent interlocking constructions of race, gender, socioeconomic status, sexuality and citizenship. Course texts include Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Ida B. Wells’ Southern Horrors,  Gayle Jones’ Corregidora, Sherley Anne Williams’ Dessa Rose,  Suzan-Lori Parks’ Venus alongside screenings of the Monster’s Ball, Girl 6,  Watermelon Woman, Without You I’m Nothing and clips from Gone with the Wind. Students will also engage with music and visual texts by Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Cassandra Wilson, and Beyonce, among others. Students will be expected to attend all screenings and/or arrange to view required films on their own time. Class size: 15

 

92463

MATH 104 B

 Data and Decision

Ethan Bloch

 T  Th    3:10 – 4:30 pm

HEG 204

MC

MATC

This course examines applications of mathematics to a number of topics related to data and decision-making. Topics will be chosen from three relevant areas of mathematics: voting systems, networks and statistics, all of which involve extracting information from various types of data. There is no particular mathematical preparation needed for this course beyond basic algebra, and a willingness to explore new ideas, construct convincing arguments and use a spreadsheet. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic. Class size: 22

 

92363

ARTH 125

 MODERN ARCHITECTURE I

Deepa Ramaswany

T  Th     11:50 -1:10 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies  This course will address the history of modern architecture from its emergence in Western Europe during the eighteenth century through to its widespread presence and diversification by the end of World War II. The course will pay particular attention to the ways in which architects have responded to, and participated in, formal and aesthetic developments in other arts, as well as the role of architecture in broader technological, economic, and social-political transformations. Covering many aspects of architecture from buildings, drawings, models, exhibitions, and schools, to historical and theoretical writings and manifestoes we will investigate a range of modernist practices, polemics, and institutions. The readings, both primary and secondary texts, have been selected both to provide an overview of the history of modern architecture and to offer a number of critical and historical approaches to evaluating its legacy. Figures discussed include Schinkel, Paxton, Sullivan, Wright, Oud, Corbusier, Mies, and Aalto. Requirements include two short written assignments, a midterm, and a final exam. No prerequisites. Art History distribution: 1800-present Class size: 22  

 

92364

ARTH 268

 ARCHITECTURE AND MID-CENTURY MODERNIZATION, 1945-1973

Deepa Ramaswany

T  Th     3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 204

AA

AART

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies  This course looks at architecture and planning’s prolific and prodigious turn in the postwar years between 1945 and 1973—a period bookended by the end of the second World War and the Bretton Woods agreement in 1945 and the international oil embargo of 1973. This was an important political and economic moment when massive, often state-influenced, architectural projects were designed to combat the problems that came with the formation of new nation states or assisted in the reconfiguration of old ones. These projects were part of a global geographical and spatial restructuring that kick-started the midcentury transformation of architectural modernism through modernization. Course material will be thematically organized by drifts, tendencies and events that became part of this moment set against decolonization and development discourses.  Art History Distribution: 1800-present   Class size: 22

 

92361

BLC 210

 INCLUSIVE PEDAGOGY

Ariana Stokas

   W  F     11:50 – 1:10 pm

OLIN LC 118

 (2 credits) This course will introduce students to the theories and practices connected to creating equitable and inclusive learning experiences. Inclusive pedagogy invites us to consider our choices around both the content that is taught and the means through which it is delivered. It seeks to account for the role of identity in the classroom and how it interacts with the classroom community, content and teacher. Some of the theories students will be introduced to include implicit bias, stereotype threat, facilitating belonging in the classroom as well as universal design. Students who successfully complete the course will be eligible to apply to become Inclusive Pedagogy Fellows, a new campus initiative. This course will meet for the first 10 weeks of the semester.  Class size: 15

 

92344

ECON 317

 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION

Aniruddha Mitra

T   Th      1:30 – 2:50 pm

HEG 106

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Economics & Finance  Industrial organization is the study of how industries function and how firms interact within an industry. While this is part of the general agenda of microeconomics, industrial organization distinguishes itself by its emphasis on the study of firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets. The primary objective of this course is to investigate how firms acquire market power or the ability to influence the price of their product; the strategic behavior of firms that possess market power; and the effect of policy intervention in such industries.  Prerequisite: Economics 201  Class size: 15

 

92342

MUS 185

 INTRODUCTION TO ETHNOMUSICOLOGY

Whitney Slaten

  T  Th     10:10 – 11:30 am

BLM N217

SA

SSCI

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of ethnomusicology, the study of music in and around its social and cultural contexts. Through our exploration of the materiality and meaning of music, we will listen to wide-ranging examples of sounds from around the globe. We will consider ways to listen deeply and to write critically about music. We will examine how music has been represented in the past and how it is variously represented today, and will develop ethnographic research and writing skills. We will ask questions about the utility and value of music as a commodity in our everyday lives and in our globalized world. We will debate the ethics of musical appropriations and collaborations. We will examine both the foundational questions of the discipline (addressing debates about musical authenticity, musical origins, universals, comparative frameworks, and the preservationist ethos) as well as recent subjects of ethnomusicological concern. Topics will include: media and technology; post-colonial issues; music and language; hybridity; circulation and consumption; music and labor; music and gender; and the relevance of music to contemporary indigenous politics and human rights.   Class size: 20

 

92343

MUS 253

 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ETHNOMUSICOLOGY: LOUDSPEAKERS AS CULTURE

Whitney Slaten

 M  W       11:50– 1:10 pm

BLM N210

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities  How do loudspeakers construct musical culture? How does listening to loudspeakers reorganize social behavior? Critical organology, intersections of local and global influences, manufacturing and nationalism, cultural imperialism, strategies of resistance, generational change, race and bass, gender and power, digital technology, fidelity and loss as technological and cultural ideas, and ethnographic inquiry will be themes that organize the course. Students will understand the importance of loudspeakers from the perspectives of ethnomusicology, sound studies, and audio science. Class sessions will include experiments with audio transducers, as well as critical listening for the contributions of audio transducers in recorded and amplified music. Through weekly reading and writing assignments, short papers, and an ethnographic research paper, students will complete the course with a nuanced understanding of the relationship between music, technology, and culture.

 

 

Cancelled courses:

 

92216

PHIL 226

 Science and Social Values

Michelle Hoffman

 T  Th    3:10-4:30 pm

HEG 102

MBV

HUM

 

92011

ARTH 229

 FREEDOM, SLAVERY, EMANCIPATION

Julia Rosenbaum

 T  Th  3:10 pm – 4:30 pm

OLIN 204

AA

AART

 

91882

BIO 153

 Global Change Biology

Bruce Robertson

  W  F     10:10 am-11:30 am

RKC 101

LS

SCI

 

92300

FIN 190

 ACCOUNTING

Felipe Carvalho de Rezende

  M  W    11:50 am – 1:10 pm

LEVY

MC

MATC

 

 

92358

HIST 206

 CRITICAL HISTORIES OF TECHNOLOGY IN MODERN AMERICA

Jeannette Estruth

M W         3:10– 4:30 pm

HEG 204

HA

 

HIST

 

 

92359

HIST 211

 HISTORIES OF WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY UNITED STATES

Jeannette Estruth

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

HEG 106

HA

HIST

 

92220

PHIL 238

 Philosophy and Literature

Ruth Zisman

 T  Th    11:50-1:10 pm

OLIN 201

MBV

HUM

 

92223

PHIL 337

 the Life of the Mind: Hannah Arendt

Thomas Bartscherer

M           4:40-7:00 pm

HEG 308

MBV

HUM

 

 

Amended course:

 

92001

ART 100

 Digital I: Digital to Physical

Maggie Hazen

 M          1:30 pm- 4:30 pm

FISHER

PA

PART

4 credits  This course will provide an introductory approach to digital sculpture for visual artists. We will cover basic software and digital equipment by designing a series of versatile, studio driven images and sculptures on each piece of equipment in the Studio Arts digital lab and woodshop—taking the work from physical to digital and back again. Students will learn basic Adobe Creative Suite programs: Photoshop and Illustrator, along with open source 3D modelling software. Projects designed with these software programs will manifest physically through the use of industry standard equipment such as laser cutting, 3D printing, 3D scanning, digital printing and CNC available in our digital lab. Today, digital machines do not simply produce images and information; they produce subjects and govern ways of existing. No prior digital knowledge is necessary. Open only to Art Majors. Class size: 14

 

 

Amendment to prerequisites:

 

91939

MATH 301

 Scientific Computing

Stefan Mendez-Diez

 T  Th    3:10 pm-4:30 pm

ALBEE 100

MC

MATC

Prerequisites: MATH 213, MATH 242, or PHYS 221, and one of CMSC 141m MATH 245, or PHYS 222,  or permission of the instructor. 

Class size: 15

 

 

Description corrections:

 

91803

BLC 235

COMPOSIITION THEORY AND PEDAGOGY

Jim Keller

 T  Th      3:10– 4:30 pm

OLIN 305

 

 

(4 credits) This course is designed for advanced writers who want to deepen their understanding of composition, rhetoric, and grammar. Topics will include composition theory, grammar and its role in the service of meaning and rhetoric, and revision in both theory and practice. We will address questions of composition pedagogy to see how successful models of teaching (and tutoring) writing can inform our understanding of the genre itself, not in theoretical isolation but as a live and critical practice. Students will write and revise essays, provide feedback to fellow writers, and complete an independent project. Class size: 12

 

92282

CNSV 240

 Composing in Classical Forms

John Halle

 T  Th    1:30- 2:50 pm

BITO 210

 

 

Core Sequence in Theory, Analysis, and Composition. Composing in Styles is a class based on the study of musical form, the large scale plan according to which extended works unfold in time. You will learn about these forms by composing four complete pieces within each type, generally these have included 1) a baroque dance form movement-modelled on the Bach solo violin Partitas and the Bach cello suites 2) a set of five variations on a ground bass, 3) a group of waltzes and 4) a complete sonata exposition. The process of composing these involves examining several pieces of each formal type, extracting from them the basic principles of their construction. Then, you will immediately compose sections of the work submitting them to me for suggestions for revision, reworking each section until a musically satisfying and coherent piece within the basic style is achieved. Pre-requisite: CNSV 140 or permission of the instructor. Exemption policy: Students who have composed works in the tonal style can place out of CNSV 240 by submitting a portfolio of these pieces. Class size: 20

 

92270

PHOT 316

 Art & the Uses of Photography

Barbara Ess

   Th       10:10 am-1:10 pm

WDS

PA

PART

Open to Junior and Senior level students in all disciplines (and Sophomore-level by permission of the instructor) with a strong interest in investigating and producing art via photographic imagery. The course will focus on photography as a material or tool in art making. Students will create a body of work using photographic digital and print media and other means of representation and reproduction. There will be readings and discussions on the history, meaning and theory of the use of photography in art. The class will include visits to art galleries and museums to look at and consider photographic-based work in contemporary art practice. There will be basic instruction and access to digital printing and scanning. The course does not involve darkroom training and facilities will only be available on a limited basis to students with prior experience. Please email ess@bard.edu briefly describing your interest.  Class size: 8

 

92053

FREN 240

 Topics in French Literature

Matthew Amos

 T  Th    3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

Serving as an overview of modern French literature, this class will focus on an assortment of texts (novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays) that reflect on themselves as texts, on themselves as literature.  From a variety of different perspectives, they all ask the question: why literature?  How can literature serve as a response to a problem (be it personal or political), or, taken from another angle, why is the questioning at the heart of literature often seemingly the sole solution?  This class will explore many of the ways in which, over the past three and a half centuries, literature has attempted to grasp its own essence.  Readings from Diderot, Rousseau, Stendhal, Balzac, Nerval, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Breton, Sartre and Duras (among others). Taught in French.  Interested students should consult with Prof. Amos prior to registration.  Class size: 20

 

 

Schedule changes:

 

92002

MUS 268

 Literature and Language of Music of the  20th  & 21st  Centuries

Peter Laki

 T  Th    11:50 am – 1:10 pm

BITO 210

AA

AART

 

92089

LIT 3139

 Geography of Unease

Marina van Zuylen

   W        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 303

LA

D+J

ELIT

DIFF

 

92335

PS 355

 The Politics of Desire: From Antigone to #MeToo

Samantha Hill

  T             4:40 pm – 7:00 pm

 Hannah Arendt Center

SA

SSCI

 

92257

HR 354

 Reproductive Health  and Human Rights

Helen Epstein

  T          1:30 pm-3:50 pm

Barringer House 104

SA

D+J

SSCI

 

92041

RUS 225

 Art of Russian Avant-Garde (1900-1934)

Oleg Minin

 T  Th    11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 102

FL

FLLC

 

 

Change of  professor:

 

91887

BIO 202

 Ecology and Evolution

Bruce Robertson

  W  F     8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

LS

SCI

 

 

Correction of distribution area:

 

92308

FILM 307

 LANDSCAPE AND MEDIA

Peggy Ahwesh

 T           1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 217

PA

PART

 

 

Additional cross-listings:

 

92162

ARTH 290

 Chinese Art

Patricia Karetzky

  W         1:30 pm-3:50 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies

 

92295

ARTH 352

 CITIES AND PHOTOGRAPHY

Luc Sante

  T          1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 301

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies  

 

92157

HIST 3103

 Political Ritual  IN THE Modern World

Robert Culp

   Th       10:10 am-12:30 pm

OLIN 306

HA

D+J

HIST

DIFF

Cross-listed: Anthropology; Asian Studies; Experimental Humanities; Global & International Studies; Human Rights; Sociology