BARD COLLEGE COURSE LIST ADDENDUM

SPRING 2018

 

ADDITIONAL COURSES:

 

18684

BIO 121

 OBESITY

Michael Tibbetts

                               LAB:

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30am

     Th  11:30am–12:50pm

RKC 115

RKC 114

LS

SCI

Cross-listed: Global Public Health   According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults, and 17% of children and adolescents, are obese.  The estimated annual cost of obesity was $147 billion in 2008.  This course will explore the potential factors contributing to the obesity epidemic, by examining epidemiological and experimental evidence.  These factors include: behavior, evolution, genetics/physiology, and microbiome.  In the laboratory we will explore the influence of genetics on obesity as well as the efficacy of interventions, using an emerging model system for the study of metabolism and obesity, zebrafish. Prerequisite: passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic, and experience in high school biology and chemistry.  Class size: 20

 

18585

BIO 430

 PERSONALIZED MEDICINE

Caryn Hale

Kirsty Sawicka

M        1:30 pm-3:30 pm

OLIN 100

2 credits  The Human Genome Project, a 13-year long project with the objective of determining the DNA sequence of the entire human genome, was completed in 2003. It is regarded as one of the major landmarks in modern biological research and remains the world's largest collaborative biological project. In this course, through critical reading of primary research papers, we will explore how modern sequencing technology has transformed our understanding of human disease and revolutionized our approach to medical research. Over the last decade, the cost of genome sequencing has plummeted to the point where using an individual’s genetic profile to guide medical decisions about prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease is becoming increasingly widespread. As we enter the era of “personalized medicine”, we will review specific examples of successful targeted therapies but also discuss the limitations and difficulties associated with such interventions. The course will be broken into three modules: overview/introduction (3-4 weeks), application of human genomic information to human diseases (6-9 weeks), emerging therapies (3-4 weeks). Students will be graded on in class presentations of primary literature, class participation, and various formal writing assignments. Prerequisites: Moderated student or permission of the instructor. Class size: 12

 

18894

CMSC 145 B

 Discrete Math

Japheth Wood

 T  Th  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 102

MC

MATC

Discrete mathematics includes those areas of mathematics that are essential to computer science, information theory, combinatorics, and genetics.  This course emphasizes creative problem solving, linking language to logic, and learning to read and write proofs.  The topics covered include propositional logic, predicate logic, inductive proof, sets, relations, functions, introductory combinatorics and discrete probability.  Applications drawn from computation will motivate most topics.  Prerequisite: Mathematics 141 or programming experience.  Class size: 16

 

18866

ECON 213

 ECONOMIC TRANSITION FROM SOCIALISM TO A MARKET-BASED SYSTEM

TBA

  M  W 11:50 am–1:10 pm

OLIN 301

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies, Russian and Eurasian Studies  This course explores one of the major events in the economic history of the 20th century: the collapse of the socialist system in the countries of the former Soviet Union, and Central and Eastern Europe, and their transition to market–based economies. We will start the course by investigating the causes of the collapse of the socialist system. We will then identify similarities and differences in the economic environments of the countries in this seemingly homogeneous group. Important objectives of this course are to analyze economic challenges associated with the transition process and to investigate policy tools that these countries have used to address these challenges. To achieve these objectives, we will study a range of topics, which include privatization, price liberalization, inflation, unemployment, changes in the composition of output, national debt and budget deficits, informal economy, and the fight against corruption, among other topics. An important emphasis will be placed on the impact of the economic transformation on social indicators such as income distribution, poverty, education, and health.  This course satisfies the economic history requirement for the economics major.  Prerequisite: One Economics course, or permission of the instructor. Class size: 20

 

18880

ECON 237

 ECONOMICS OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR

TBA

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEGEMAN 308

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies  This course focuses on the role of the government in the economy and covers four general areas: government revenue, government expenditure, regulation, and public choice. Applying a variety of methodologies, students will learn to creatively and critically analyze public policy. We will frame policy and its implications in terms of social relations and seek to explain how these policies impact the processes which provide the flow of goods and services enabling society to meet the needs of its members. Topics will include many current policy issues including, but not limited to market and government failures, budget deficits, tax reform, schooling and environmental protection. In covering these topics we will consider reasons for intervention, explore costs and benefits of policies, as well as the response of society’s members to these policies. Prerequisite: Econ 100.  Class size: 22

 

18850

EUS 101

 Introduction to Environmental & Urban STUDY

Michele Dominy

 

 M  W     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 204

SA

SSCI

An introduction to key themes and fields that addresses environmental and urban questions. While disentangling and analyzing the terms used to describe aspects of the environment—nature/culture, human/nonhuman, wilderness, urbanism, countryside, and the city—this interdisciplinary course considers issues such as environmental justice, biodiversity preservation, protected natural areas, infrastructure, agricultural and food sustainability, ecotourism, climate change, and development. The course is organized around four ways that humans relate to their environments: observing, organizing and classifying, collecting and distributing, and conserving. Under the rubric of each category, students will become familiar with various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches represented in the EUS curriculum (such as anthropology, cultural geography, environmental literature and history, modeling and statistics, natural history, political ecology, sociology, spatial analysis, and urban economics), while engaging with their methods. EUS 101 and EUS 102 are required courses for moderation into EUS. Class size: 22

 

18861

FILM 229

CHARACTER AND STORY

Lisa Krueger

M        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

An introductory screenwriting course that focuses on writing character-driven short pieces.  There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques.  The course will cover story structure and story design in relationship to character development.  The students will complete a short character study screenplay. No prerequisites.   Class size: 12

 

18895

MATH 105 B

time, space and infinity:  Mathematical Perspectives on Philosophical Paradoxes

Steven Simon

M W     10:10 am-11:30 pm

HEG 106

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Experimental Humanities; Philosophy   If time is composed of moments with zero duration, is change an illusion? Beginning with Zeno’s ancient paradoxes, fundamental problems on the nature of time and space – and intimately related ones regarding infinity – have bedeviled thinkers through the contemporary period. This course will provide a beginner-friendly tour of some of mathematics’ most profound discoveries (irrational numbers, limits, uncountability) and the concerns (e.g., how can there be the “same” amount of whole numbers as there are fractions, yet “fewer” fractions than real numbers?) which arise in answering such intractable questions. Other than a working knowledge of basic algebra, the class requires only a willingness to explore new ideas and construct convincing arguments. Prerequisite: Passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic. Class size: 22

 

18862

PHIL 316

THE BAD, THE UGLY, AND THE SICK: NEGATIVE FOUNDATIONS OF ETHICS

Artemy Magun

 

     Th  10:10 am–12:30pm

OLIN 309

MBV

HUM

This course will take up many of the central questions of ethics: How should we organize our lives? What rules of thumb should we apply in difficult situations? What goals should we set ourselves? Can we control our emotions, and if so, how should we do it? Is virtue possible, and how is it different from vice? But there is a special angle under which the course will address these questions, namely: what should we not do and why? How do we deal with an offense or an enemy? Is one responsible for one’s own trauma? Is there such a thing as vice? The paradox of our culture is that, focused as it is on enjoyment and personal success, its political and social imaginary is filled with demonic “axes of evil” and the cultivated emotions are those of depression or anxiety. Why is this happening? Are the current cultural rituals efficient in dealing with unpleasant expectations and memories? What are the conditions of tolerance and the conditions of enmity? We will try to approach if not answer these difficult questions during the course. An interdisciplinary set of readings combines philosophy, psychology, and cultural studies. It includes such authors as St Augustine, Kant, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Freud, Arendt, Levinas, Žižek, S. Forti, and others. Requirements include participation, an interpretive essay, and a research paper.  Class size: 15

 

18583

PHIL 361

 INTRODUCTION TO CARIBBEAN PHILOSOPHY

Ariana Stokas

 M       1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 301

MBV

D+J

HUM

This course will introduce students to the rich tradition of philosophical ideas in the Caribbean. The course will aim at doing philosophy and not only knowing philosophers. This distinction is important as areas with a legacy of epistemological colonialism, like the Caribbean, have many works that contain a substratum of philosophical ideas but have not necessarily been welcomed as canonical works of philosophy. Thus we will seek to engage in philosophy as a questioning activity that attempts to answer epistemic, aesthetic, normative and metaphysical questions. Some threads of analysis unique to this geography that this course will cover, include: the idea that philosophy is a contextual project rooted in a specific place rather than an abstract, ideal theory; the effect of colonialism on culture and education; the exploration of creolization; and the critical analysis of “modernity” as a European project. Course texts include works by Edouard Glissant, Wilson Harris, Eugenio Maria Hostos, Julia de Burgos and Franz Fanon.  Class size: 15

 

18586

FSEM II LK

 First-Year Seminar II

Lisa Katzman

  T       1:30 pm-2:50 pm

     Th  1:30 pm-2:50 pm

ASP 302

OLIN 101

 

 

 

CANCELLED COURSES:

 

18208

ART 219

 The Painterly Print

Kenneth Buhler

M        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

UBS

PA

PART

 

18556

ARTH 133

 interpreting montgomery place: an introduction to cultural heritage and public history

Julia Rosenbaum

 

  M      4:40 pm -6:00 pm

 

FISHER ANNEX

AA

AART

DIFF

 

18055

CHEM 142 LBB

 Basic Prin of Chem II Lab

 

 T        4:40 pm-6:55 pm

RKC 126

LS

SCI

Class size: 14

 

18573

FILM 256

WRITING THE FILM

Lisa Krueger

M        1:30 pm-4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PA

PART

 

18036

BIO 118

 Conservation Biology

Cathy Collins

         LAB:

 T  Th 10:10 am-11:30 am

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

RKC 115

RKC 114

LS

SCI

 

18019

BLC 215

 ESSAYS AND EVIDENCE

James Keller

M  W       11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 101

 

 

 

18362

EUS 326

 Science, Empire and Ecology: Botanical Voyaging

Michele Dominy

 T        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 303

SA

D+J

SSCI

 

18315

LIT 2501

 Shakespeare's Comedies

Lianne Habinek

 T  Th 11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 308

LA

ELIT

 

18320

LIT 3122

 The Revenge Tragedy

Lianne Habinek

  W      1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 309

LA

ELIT

 

18322

LIT 3315

the art of Misbehaving in Renaissance England

Noor Desai

M        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

RKC 200

LA

ELIT

 

18090

MATH 332

 Abstract Algebra

Japheth Wood

M  W    10:10 am-11:30 am

HEG 106

MC

MATC

 

 

SCHEDULE CHANGES:

 

18164

ARAB 202

 Intermediate Arabic II

Elizabeth Holt

 T Th 10:10 am–11:30am

   W

OLIN 305

OLIN 310

FL

FLLC

 

18211

ART 102 LS

 Painting I

Lisa Sanditz

   Th    10:10 am-1:10 pm

FISHER 140

PA

PART

In this course students will delve into painting through a range of approaches including observation in and out of the studio, working from the figure, collage, imagination and even painting on and manipulating the surface of clay. Classroom time consists of demonstrations, studio work, lectures and group critiques.  Students will learn about the formal elements of painting such as color, form, gesture and composition, while also exploring their own individual style. Discussion of traditional, modern and contemporary painting will be encouraged. Materials will cost $150-200 for the course. *The Fund for Visual Learning provides material support to students on financial aid to help them with art supplies. Students taking a Level 1 Studio Art class may be eligible for this support for the supply "kit" for the class for up to $150.Students are only eligible to receive one grant in this category. Interested students should contact the professor during spring course registration. After the course registration period closes, late applications are not eligible for consideration. http://blogs.bard.edu/fvl/  Class size: 14

 

18226

ART 302 KB

 Painting III

Ken Buhler

   M     1:30 pm-4:30 pm

UBS

PA

PART

This class offers each student the opportunity to deeply explore and expand their personal painting interests. One of its goals is to help students locate ideas essential to their art and develop those ideas in the processes of painting.  Instruction will be through individual guidance, class critique, and assignments.  Assignments are structured to allow students to evolve their painting vocabulary.  They will include prompts from the external world, from the history of painting, and from students’ own experience. The thematic development of paintings and the incorporation of new materials and processes will be a part of this focus.  The availability of a printing press in the classroom will allow students to utilize transfer, repetition, and multiplication of images as part of their vocabulary, should they choose to. Students will be expected to have specific intentions in place regarding their individual pursuits. Though there will be assignments, there will be a great deal of emphasis placed upon developing independent resources in the studio. Material requirements will be in response to the particular needs of each exploration, but students will be expected to acquire materials and surfaces to work on as needed. Prerequisites: Painting I and Painting II.  Class size: 12

 

18338

FILM 167

 Survey of Electronic Art

Edward Halter

                     Screening:

    F     10:10 am-1:10 pm

   W     7:00 pm-10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 217

AA

AART

 

18345

FILM 337

 Queer Cinema

Edward Halter

                     Screening:

   Th    1:30 pm-4:30 pm

   Th    7:00 pm-10:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AA

AART

 

18522

IDEA 210

 PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Causes AND Consequences OF Migration IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

Aniruddha Mitra

Peter Rosenblum

 T  Th 1:30 pm- 4:30 pm

RKC 102

SA

MBV

SSCI

HUM

Note: This course carries 8 credits.

 

18528

IDEA 215

 OF Utopias

Kevin Duong

Olga Touloumi

 T  Th 10:10 am-12:30 pm

HEG 204

AA

SA

AART

SSCI

Cross-listed: Art History, Environmental & Urban Studies, Experimental Humanities, Political Studies  This course carries 6 credits.

 

18181

JAPN 302

 Advanced Japanese II

Mika Endo

M  W   8:30 am-9:50 am

OLINLC 118

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies

 

18077

MATH 105

time, space and infinity:  Mathematical Perspectives on Philosophical Paradoxes

Steven Simon

M    W 11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 102

MC

MATC

 

18261

MUS 108R

 Bard Georgian Choir

Carl Linich

   Th    4:40 pm-7:00 pm

BDH

PA

PART

 

18437

PS 115

 Political Theory

Samantha Hill

M  W  10:10 am–11:30 am

OLIN 303

SA

SSCI

 

18529

PS 202

 radical Political thought

Samantha Hill

M  W  3:10 pm–4:30 pm

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

 

 

DESCRIPTION CORRECTIONS:

 

18224

ART 200 AC

GREETINGS FROM THE Anthropocene

Adriane Colburn

  W      1:30 pm-4:30 pm

FISHER

PA

PART

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies  We are at the dawn of the Anthropocene, a new epoch marked by the significant and conscious influence of human behavior on the Earth. This geologic time period is shaped by the overwhelming global evidence that atmospheric, geologic and other earth systems are now altered by humans. In this interdisciplinary studio class, we will explore strategies for reflecting on the scope of our human impact.  Through research, field trips and investigative art making, we will dig into how the hidden residue of the Anthropocene resides in our local landscape.  Topics will range from infrastructure and industry to dramatic changes in the natural landscape and the redistribution of species, to alterations to the chemistry of our air and water and the psychological and cultural ramifications of living in a human dominated world. Using the unique skills of each student as a launch pad, we will delve into a range of methods for articulating our findings on this complex topic.  Tools including (but not limited to) photography, audio and visual storytelling, book making and video will be used to create individual projects and a dynamic final group exhibition. Prerequisites: Digital 1, Expanded Media, Photography or permission of the instructor. Class size: 12

 

18231

ART 209 BG

 Printmaking II: Silkscreen

Beka Goedde

    F     10:10 am-1:10 pm

UBS

PA

PART

This course is a thorough introduction to the technique of screenprinting. Students work with a variety of silkscreen techniques to create multilayered and multicolored images on paper and other printable surfaces. Using the immediacy, versatility, and photographic possibilities of silkscreen, students are challenged to bring their work to an increasing level of complexity, depth and refinement. Additional print techniques working with and on paper and photographic-based media are incorporated into the course, including digital printing onto transparency film, laser cutting, and pronto plate printing. Prior printmaking experience recommended, but not required. This course is held in the UBS Barn in Red Hook.

 

18168

CHI 106

 Intensive BEGINNING Chinese

Li-Hua Ying

M T W Th  1:30 pm-3:25 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Asian Studies 8 credits  This introductory course is intended for beginners. It focuses on both the oral and written aspects of the language. The goal is to acquire a basic understanding of standard Chinese, and the ability to make simple conversations. Selected topics and situations come from real life scenarios and can be used for everyday communications.  An 8-week summer immersion program in Qingdao, China will follow this course.  Upon successful completion of the summer program, the students will receive six credits. (Financial aid is available for qualified students to cover part of the cost of the summer program. Contact Prof. Ying for details.) Class size: 15

 

18301

DAN 316 TBD

 Dance Repertory: AdvANCED Modern REP

TBDC

   Th    11:50 am-1:10 pm

    F     11:30 am-1:10 pm

CAMPUS MPR

FISHER PAC THORNE STUDIO

PA

PART

2 credits Students must audition for this course.  Audition to be held at the end of the fall term. Course will culminate in a performance for the faculty concert in the spring. Contact tlorenzen@bard.edu with questions.

 

18318

LIT 333

 Innovative ContempORARY Fiction

Bradford Morrow

M        1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 305

LA

ELIT

In this course students will have the unique opportunity to meet and interact with several leading contemporary writers who will join us in class to discuss their work, answer questions about the art of fiction, and then give a public reading from a recent book.  We will also devote much time to close readings of key novels and short story collections by innovative fiction writers of the past couple of generations, with an eye toward exploring the great diversity of voices and styles employed in these narratives as well as the cultural issues they chronicle.  Particular emphasis will be placed on reading and analyzing books by some of fiction’s most pioneering practitioners, including Richard Powers, Cormac McCarthy, Angela Carter, Jeanette Winterson, William Gaddis, Kazuo Ishiguro, Lydia Davis, Michael Ondaatje, Ian McEwan, Jamaica Kincaid, Karan Mahajan, and others whose work has revitalized and revolutionized our understanding of narrative forms.

 

18114

MBB 317

 Mind, Brain & Behavior Seminar

Justin Hulbert

   Th    2:30 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 302

 

 

Cross-listed: Psychology  2 credits Students concentrating in Mind, Brain & Behavior are required to take this two-credit course for graduation. Each senior presents personal research in progress or significant material from the literature. Each junior presents an interesting paper of personal choice from the literature. The purpose of the seminar is to enhance communication among seniors about their research and to encourage juniors to become familiar with both the academic literature and research undertaken in the program, such as topics from cognitive psychology, neuroscience, computational modeling, philosophy of mind, linguistics, music cognition, and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: Moderated status or permission of the instructor. 

 

18433

PS 104

 International Relations

Michelle Murray

M  W  8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & International Studies; Human Rights (core course) 

 

 

CHANGE OF PROFESSOR:

 

18041

BIO 202

 Ecology and Evolution

Cathy Collins

  W  F  8:30 am-11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

LS

SCI

 

 

DISTRIBUTION AREA AMENDMENT:

 

18508

HR 101

 Introduction to Human Rights

Thomas Keenan

M  W  11:50 am-1:10 pm

HDR 106

SA

D+J

SSCI

DIFF

 

18529

PS 202

 radical Political thought

Samantha Hill

M  W  3:10 pm–4:30 pm

OLIN 202

MBV

HUM

 

18051

SCI 150

 Thinking about Thinking

George Rose

  W  F  1:30 pm-3:30 pm

RKC 100

LS

SCI

 

 

ADDITIONAL CROSS-LISTING:

18199

ARTH 210

 Roman Art and Architecture

Diana DePardo-Minsky

 T  Th    3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

Cross-listed: Classical Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Italian Studies